After dealing with flailing global economies, numerous recalls and safety allegations and then the depleted inventory from the devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan, Experian Automotive says that Toyota is finally back on top when it comes to consumer loyalty in the US. Toyota edged out General Motors and Ford Motor Company to grab this loyalty crown for the first time since the third quarter of 2009.

The metric for this title was determined by owners of a vehicle choosing from the same corporate automaker for their next vehicle purchase. For Toyota, this means that 47.3 percent of its current customers will purchase a Scion, Lexus or Toyota model as their next car compared to 46.2 percent for GM and 46 percent for Ford. Honda and Hyundai rounded out the top five in this list.

In terms of individual brand loyalty – when buyers come back to the same brand – Ford took the spot in this category with 44.7 percent of buyers returning to the Ford showroom for their next purchase, including six cars in the top 10 for overall loyalty. Ford Fusion customers are the most loyal with 59.9 percent buying another Ford, but Flex, Edge, Five Hundred, Escape and Fiesta are all in the top 10. Oddly enough, the top vehicle among brand loyalty was the Chevrolet Sonic (which has only been on the market for less than a year – we're not sure what to make of that...) with 60.3 percent of its buyers trading in for another Chevy product.

Other interesting facts to note from Experian Automotive's study include the median age of vehicles has increased from 9.8 years up to 10.8 years since 2008, indicating that people are keeping their cars for an extra year before trading them in. Besides Toyota, Chrysler was the only automaker listed as having increased its market share and vehicle purchases in the second quarter of this year.

Scroll down for Experian's press release or click here for the informative infographic in PDF form.
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Experian Automotive: Toyota Motor Sales, USA, grabs top spot in corporate loyalty for first time since 2009

Ford maintains strong brand loyalty with four of five top performing models

Schaumburg, Ill., Oct. 10, 2012 -Toyota Motor Sales, USA, ranked highest in corporate loyalty in Q2 2012, according to the Experian Automotive Loyalty and Market Trend analysis. Toyota saw its corporate loyalty increase from 41.6 percent in Q2 2011 to 47.3 percent, enabling it to pass both General Motors and Ford Motor Co. This increase marks the first time Toyota has achieved the top spot in corporate loyalty since Q3 2009.

High-level findings from the analysis showcase the top trends in vehicle loyalty, manufacturer market share, vehicle age and new vehicle registrations.

"Toyota has done an outstanding job of regaining customer trust and getting repeat customers into showrooms," said Jeffrey Anderson, director of consulting and analytics for Experian Automotive. "To restore normal operations and regain customer trust in such a short time following the earthquake and tsunami is a truly remarkable comeback."

Experian Automotive defines corporate loyalty as measuring whether a new vehicle purchase matches a prior vehicle owned at the corporate level. This includes all brands under the corporate umbrella. Rounding out the top five in corporate loyalty are General Motors (46.2 percent), Ford Motor Co. (46.0 percent), Hyundai Motor Group (45.3 percent) and Honda Motor Company (43.1 percent).

In regards to Brand Loyalty, the Chevrolet Sonic was the top model, which means that 60.1 percent of Sonic owners who returned to the market bought another Chevrolet vehicle. Ford rounded out the top five in Brand Loyalty by model, with the Ford Fusion (59.9 percent), Ford Flex (55.0 percent), Ford Edge (54.0 percent) and Ford Five Hundred (52.0 percent) owners being the most loyal to the brand.

In other highlights:

• Total vehicle purchases were up by more than 370,000 units, going from 3.2 million registrations in Q2 2011 to 3.6 million in Q2 2012. This metric has been steadily increasing since the economic downturn, when vehicle purchases dropped to 2.5 million in Q2 2009.
• Toyota posted the largest unit sales gain with 145,000 additional registrations, followed by Chrysler with more than 83,000 new registrations.
• Toyota had the biggest market share gain in Q2 with 2.8 percent.
• GM had the steepest Q2 decline in market share at -1.5 percent.
• The average age of vehicle has increased from 10.6 years in Q2 2011 to 10.8 years in Q2 2012.


An infographic representing key findings from this analysis also is available online. Please visit www.ExperianAutomotive.com.

About Experian Automotive
Experian Automotive provides information services and market intelligence that enables results-driven professionals to gain the fullest possible understanding of the market, the vehicles and the people who buy them. Its North American Vehicle DatabaseSM houses data on nearly 700 million vehicles and, when combined with Experian's credit, consumer and business information, provides an integrated perspective into the automotive marketplace. Experian Automotive's AutoCheck® vehicle history reports provide dealers and consumers with in-depth information, allowing them to confidently understand, compare and select the right vehicles. For more information on Experian Automotive and its suite of services, visit our Website at www.ExperianAutomotive.com.

About Experian
Experian® is the leading global information services company, providing data and analytical tools to clients around the world. The Group helps businesses to manage credit risk, prevent fraud, target marketing offers and automate decision making. Experian also helps individuals to check their credit report and credit score, and protect against identity theft.

Experian plc is listed on the London Stock Exchange (EXPN) and is a constituent of the FTSE 100 index. Total revenue for the year ended 31 March 2012 was US$4.5 billion. Experian employs approximately 17,000 people in 44 countries and has its corporate headquarters in Dublin, Ireland, with operational headquarters in Nottingham, UK; California, US; and São Paulo, Brazil.

For more information, visit www.experianplc.com.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 40 Comments
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        TsarBomba
        • 2 Years Ago
        We've got a Toyota truck as one of our vehicles. When its time has come, i will definitely purchase another. It has been a reliable, problem free vehicle and the packaging is perfect for our lives. Why not be loyal when you have had good experiences with a product? I may be the minority if your theory is correct, but I'd gladly 'want' another Toyota.
        jtav2002
        • 2 Years Ago
        So NO one would buy 2 Toyota's in row? None. It's ALL a gimmick? Fascinating theory.
        Zoom
        • 2 Years Ago
        Lots of manufacturers do it. It's called rewarding your customers. And why would you change when something treats you well?
      Vien Huynh
      • 2 Years Ago
      Idk about you guys or the haters, but my camry is pretty reliable for 150K miles already... so when it break down, I probably buy another one
        Basil Exposition
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Vien Huynh
        Did you know that most modern cars are pretty reliable to 150k and beyond? You do have options...
          Green Machine
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Basil Exposition
          Not in my experience. I've seen head gasket failures on completely different cars/vans from both Ford and Chrysler before 100K miles. Early water pump failures, early dash component failures, constant failing sensors. For awhile, VW had horrible supply failures of ECUs and other sensors. While there are always acceptations. If the newest cars are better built, that is great, but they don't yet have the same long term reliability that Toyota/Honda and others have. My first car was a Ford/Mazda and it lasted 300K miles. Some cars are designed and built better then others in the same family line up. You can't always say X brand is good, because a car in the line up can be complete crap. Toyota overall has a reliable lineup over all their cars/trucks. A few bad apples might get out, but overall, they are pretty solid.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Vien Huynh
        [blocked]
        morning_glory1
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Vien Huynh
        So many cars these days will do 150K without issues. Toyota is hardly alone. My coworkers Yukon is now at 225,000 miles and climbing, and he uses it to tow as well.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        Lx495
        • 2 Years Ago
        You said just what I was going to say, but more colorfully. So the least I could do is upvote your comment. That's right. At least two or three generations of Americans, if not people around the world, were treated like respected houseguests by large Japanese automobile companies. And were treated like real-world product durability volunteers by the Big Three. Both memories are durable.
      Steve
      • 2 Years Ago
      Old people have a short memory...... They easily forget about Toyota problem along with where they put their depends, dentures, glasses, keys, etc.......
      Generic
      • 2 Years Ago
      The Toyota unintended acceleration media frenzy was just that. A media frenzy. A few people might have truly been spooked by it, but owners who's car never really took off on them and still had a reliable car probably wasn't swayed so easily. Toyota might not make the most exciting cars on the road, but with regular fluid changes and used without abuse, they should all easily go 150K+ without a single major repair. That is why they are so popular. The fact that many are now made in the US doesn't hurt either. I had a Toyota once and it was a great car. I want one again. They just work, plain and simple.
        Walt
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Generic
        Media frenzy? So unsecured floor mats because Toyota was too cheap to install a floor anchor and sticky accelerator pedals that combined equaled 10 million vehicles recalled is your idea of a media frenzy? People died because of Toyota's malfeasance. Toyotaphiles, stop trying to rewrite history. Toyota built their reliability image on denying and hiding defects and a media that has always imports over domestic vehicles because our media is filled with left wing communists that want to see capitalism and America fail. The actual truth is Toyota's are of lower quality than every other vehicle on the road, having lead the industry in recalls in 3 of the past 4 years and they'll likely lead in recalls again this year.
          BL
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Walt
          You sir, seriously need to get your facts straight. Toyota's "unintended acceleration issue" was a media frenzy that was initiated by the federal government because of conflicts of interest. Namely, Ray LaHood from NHTSA. Once he got done trying to convince the US public that Toyota vehicles were unsafe explosion machines due to faulty electronics, these vehicles were investigated by Toyota engineers, engineers from NHTSA, and NASA (yes, rocket scientists). Turns out, Ray had no idea what he was talking about. Toyota was cleared of any wrong-doing and any electrical problems. However, that story didn't get quite as big a headline because the federal government just sunk billions of taxpayer dollars into bailing out GM. Therein lies the conflict of interest. Also, the recalls that happened were VOLUNTARY recalls from Toyota. NOT forced recalls by the government. They lowered the floor beneath the floormats so stupid drivers that forgot to install their floormats correctly wouldn't have a problem again. And as far as floor anchors are concerned, they have been in Toyota vehicles since at LEAST 1998. So, you're completely and totally wrong. People didn't die because of Toyota. People died because of driver error, and not caring about the fact that their floormats weren't installed correctly, not because of Toyota. That's a FACT. In FACT, there have been over 25,000 complaints of unintended acceleration in the past decade. Less than 10% were related to Toyota vehicles. It's a driver error issue with a number of manufacturers. I agree with you that the media is filled with left wingers. But that's where out agreements stop. What the HELL are you talking about when you say Toyota's are of lower quality? How is that the "actual truth"? Where are you getting your information? You couldn't possible be more wrong. First of all, Toyota has led the market for years in intial quality studies by J.D. Power. In FACT, this year, the only brands that ranked higher in inital quality were luxury brands, and rightfully so (the #1 brand was Toyota's luxury wing: Lexus, by the way). Also, Forbes recently said that Toyota had more vehicles on the road over 200,000 miles than any other manufacturer. They've also been given the Best Resale Value award numerous times by Kelley Blue Book. These are not opinions Walt, these are all facts. You really need to do your research and know what you are talking about before you spray bullshit all over the internet.
          GR
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Walt
          Walt, do you know how many millions of cars there are on the road that have ill-fitting floor mats not anchored to the floor among all car brands? This is not only a Toyota issue, it's across the board. So why did this happen to Toyota? It's hard to say for certain, but given that Toyota is one of the most popular vehicle markers out there (Camry's easily outsells many other competitors put together.), it's actually explainable that a small number of the millions of people driving these things caused an issue out of their own negligence and then claimed it was the floor mat, no wait, the stuck accelerator, or hmm maybe the evil ECU (which one is it!???) issue. These claims then got media hype and was then overblown to hysteria. This was clearly evident when many fraudulent claims were discovered with some people more interested in a settlement than telling the truth. Plus, there has NEVER been any scientific evidence to show that it was Toyota's fault in ANY of these crashes. NONE. Investigations even by the government showed that many of these cases were driver error or fraudulent claims. No data nor evidence could prove it was vehicle failure. Toyota settled because they rather do damage control for the sake of preserving brand image than to tell these drivers that their idiots. Come on, these people didn't even have the sense to put the car in neutral. They don't even know what "N" does on their "PRND321". Of course they would blame the car. If you recall the scientific method from high school, you will recall that one of the paramount principles is that a scientific claim MUST BE REPLICABLE. It must be able to be reproduced. This was never the case, even when the issue morphed from floor mats to accelerator pedals, and then to ECU issues. Come on now. I'm not even a Toyota owner nor have I ever owned one, but it doesn't take much for someone to see through the bullshit. If you really want an example of an automaker's malice in hiding defects, go look up the history of the Ford Pinto. The case is even an example in textbooks of white collar crime and cover ups of dangerous products. Ford knew well ahead of time that their Pintos were susceptible to fires after a read-end collision. They also knew that the solution was to install a $13 liner in the gas tank to prevent gas leaks. They then did the math and figured it was cheaper to let some of their customers die and settle their lawsuits than to have a mass recall and install this $13 liner. They deliberately opted to let people die. This is not a conspiracy story. Go look it up. It's well documented, especially among white collar crime experts. On the other hand, Toyota recalled cars and replaced parts that weren't even actually determined to be faulty. You need to not accuse others of rewriting history if you are so ignorant of it in the first place.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        WillieD
        • 2 Years Ago
        This only pertains to customer loyalty in the U.S.
        GR
        • 2 Years Ago
        Rick, do you even read the article before you comment?
        • 2 Years Ago
        [blocked]
      mikoprivat
      • 2 Years Ago
      well I was correct again...this loyalty for toyota thing just shows that those who buy toyotas are not normal people. Millions of recalled cars for life threatening issues, yet the American alzheimer crowd comes back for more...maybe it's just masochism
      dollarbill
      • 2 Years Ago
      Owned lots of cars , worked many dealerships and Love my 4Runner & Tacoma DC , best vehicles I have owned!! My F series would be a runner up as it kept running for many years and was pretty trouble free .
      GoSpeedRacerGo
      • 2 Years Ago
      Who knew that Mother Nature had a customer loyalty problem?
      allstar369
      • 2 Years Ago
      Why was the comment section on the Tundra/Endeavor story shut down?
        jtav2002
        • 2 Years Ago
        @allstar369
        Probably because it was an overload of Toyota haters thinking it's non-patriotic and the end of the world to have a Japenese truck (albeit made right her with American parts by American workers) pulling an American shuttle. They're overly dramatic and think that's what is wrong with this country.
          GR
          • 2 Years Ago
          @jtav2002
          I just want to add that the Tundra is not even sold in Japan. I have never ever seen the Tundra in Japan and I visit just about every year. That truck was designed, developed, and made in the US by American workers in Texas. About the only thing Japanese about it is the name of the brand.
        Yang Xi Gua
        • 2 Years Ago
        @allstar369
        union sabotage
          GR
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Yang Xi Gua
          Yang, what's with you and your hate of unions? Did a big mean union rep molest you when you were a kid? WTF. Are you aware that Toyota and many Japanese brands also have worker unions? They are just comprised differently from American unions and are actually in-house unions. The Japanese had union strikes and protests in the 1950's, but resolved them with the creation of in-house unions. They then got back to work and what happened to the Japanese auto industry is pretty evident now.
      IBx27
      • 2 Years Ago
      toyota has recovered from their recent recalls. In other news: Mother Nature to regain customer loyalty crown. More details at 11.
      kontroll
      • 2 Years Ago
      yes, toyota recovers from recalls by recalling 7,000,000 units for fire hazard...good recovery toyota, BRAVO!!
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