Nissan has created a new system to help reduce the likelihood of pedal misapplication. Called the Emergency Assist for Pedal Misapplication with Carpark Detection Function (catchy, huh?), the technology uses a version of the company's ingenious Around View monitor to detect if the vehicle is in a parking space. If so and there are solid object such as other vehicles or walls near by, the vehicle's cameras will automatically control acceleration and apply the brakes to prevent a collision if inappropriate throttle use is detected. Nissan showed a similar – and presumably related – technology last year dubbed Acceleration Suppression For Pedal Misapplication, but the Elgrand figures to be the first production application of this unintended-acceleration-combating technology. Currently, the technology is slated to debut on an updated version of the Nissan Elgrand minivan in Japan.

We wouldn't be surprised to see the system show up in other markets and on other members of the family soon, including the company's gadget-happy Infiniti line. Nissan says Emergency Assist for Pedal Misapplication is part of the company's Vision Zero goal, which aims to reduce traffic deaths by countering threats at every stage of a potential accident. For more information, scroll down to watch a video showing Acceleration Suppression For Pedal Misapplication in action, and while you're there, check out the press release.
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Nissan to Debut "Emergency Assist for Pedal Misapplication" Function

YOKOHAMA, Japan (October 12, 2012) - Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. today announced the development of the "Emergency assist for pedal misapplication (with Carpark Detection Function)" to help reduce accidents caused by pedal misapplication. This new technology will debut on the new Nissan Elgrand MPV by the end of the year.

For many years, Nissan has developed and refined technology that helps avoid collisions and has, subsequently, commercialized many ensuing safety technologies. One of these is the "Emergency assist for pedal misapplication (with Carpark Detection Function), due to premiere on the updated Elgrand model – an MPV sold in Japan and in select markets throughout Asia. To date, the Elgrand has been equipped with many examples of world-first advanced safety equipment, such as the Around View Monitor and Moving Object Detection functions, among others,

The Emergency assist for pedal misapplication technology is aimed at reducing acceleration accidents in parking lots and other spaces where a car could collide with walls if a driver mistakenly depresses the accelerator instead of the brake pedal. Using the four cameras of the Around View Monitor and ultrasonic sonar, the system detects if the car is currently in a parking space or not; and if there are obstacles such as walls in the direction the vehicle is traveling. The function automatically controls acceleration if necessary and applies the brakes before a collision can occur.

Nissan has established the Vision Zero safety goal, which aims to help eliminate deaths and serious injuries due to traffic accidents. The guiding force behind this goal is the concept of the "Safety Shield", which designates the condition a car experiences into six stages, from "normal driving conditions" through "post-accident conditions." The Safety Shield works to provide the most effective barrier against sources of danger occurring at each stage. Nissan's "Emergency assist for pedal misapplication" system is based on this concept. Predicated on the Safety Shield concept, Nissan will continue to develop safety technology into the future.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 28 Comments
      dac17
      • 2 Years Ago
      Wow. This is what our technology needs to do for us? Maybe Google has it right with non driver-operated cars. Large portions of our society are obviously not competent to handle driving any more. Sad.
      Stang70Fastback
      • 2 Years Ago
      I wouldn't want this technology on my vehicle for the same reason that I always try to keep my tank full, or that I don't like not having my keys with me: I like being prepared for anything. Part of that means being able to accelerate through the front of a Day-Care center, running over 12 children and smashing through the back wall to escape the sudden mob of flesh-eating zombies that appeared behind my vehicle. Okay, that might be an extreme case, but you get where I'm going with this. I want my car to ALWAYS do what I tell it to - for better or for worse.
        karman876
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Stang70Fastback
        I agree with you 100%. Competent people don't need the nanny technology. However, the percent of our population who are incompetent continues to rise.
      Cruising
      • 2 Years Ago
      im not going to bash this because it would help elderly drivers from running into buildings by mistake.
      xspeedy
      • 2 Years Ago
      Just stop putting idiots in the driver's seat.
      IBx27
      • 2 Years Ago
      If people who need this crap never crash their cars into walls, they will never learn why you shouldn't crash your car into a wall.
      InCyphe
      • 2 Years Ago
      I guess this will make it hard to kill people with a Nissan...
      jessesrq
      • 2 Years Ago
      I can't say I've ever used the wrong pedal, but I also cannot object to safety technology that a) relies on software advancements to existing systems without adding weight and b) can be turned off if I find it annoying. I wish I could add c) leads to reduced insurance rates, but it never seems to work that way.
      MKIV
      • 2 Years Ago
      Driving tips for dummies???
      Soul Shinobi
      • 2 Years Ago
      Seeing no video?
        Andrew
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Soul Shinobi
        Sorry about the dupe posts earlier. The site kept giving me an error and telling me to try again later. As for video, I wonder if this is new. http://www.nissan-global.com/EN/TECHNOLOGY/OVERVIEW/pedal.html has a busted video. But, I did find http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ik3f52p6zE from October 13, 2011.
      MKIV
      • 2 Years Ago
      Driving tips for dummies???
      Edward
      • 2 Years Ago
      Automatic transmission drivers who use separate feet for separate pedals don't have this problem. So how do you commit suicide by crashing into something solid if your car won't let you?
        BB79826
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Edward
        Automatic transmission drivers who use separate feet for separate pedals are 1) morons, 2) the people that you see driving around with their brake lights constantly on, and 3) far more likely to slam on both pedals in an emergency situation.
          erjhe
          • 2 Years Ago
          @BB79826
          Exception: Unless they're racing. Then left foot braking is appropriate. ;)
      Blackie
      • 2 Years Ago
      That technology already exists. It's called a ******* "driver."
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