Toyota
owns part of the company, but Suzuki gets the battery.

That's the gist of Denso's development of a lithium-ion battery pack that is designed especially for cars with fuel-saving stop-start systems. The 5.5-pound battery pack weighs less because it can capture regenerative energy from when the vehicle slows down and feed that power the alternator when the car is idling and the engine is shut off. Such batteries mark an improvement over the older lead-acid batteries that are customarily used with stop-start systems.

While Denso is minority-owned by Toyota, the new battery pack will first be used in the recently-launched Suzuki Wagon R. Denso hasn't said which other vehicles will be supplied with the battery pack further down the road. Until then, you can see Denso's press release below.
Show full PR text
DENSO Develops Lithium-ion Battery Pack for Stop/Start System
- Further increases fuel efficiency on vehicles with stop/start -

KARIYA (Japan) - DENSO Corporation has developed a lithium-ion battery pack that further increases the fuel efficiency of vehicles with stop/start systems. DENSO's new battery pack allows the stop/start system to use more regenerative power than current conventional systems that use a single lead-acid battery. DENSO's battery pack consists of a battery management unit and power supply control switch, as well as battery cells that are provided by a third-party source.

Improved Fuel Economy
DENSO's new lithium-ion battery pack stores regenerated power and then supplies the stored regenerated power to the electrical and electronic components, such as the car navigation and audio systems. This reduces the power generation required by the alternator, which results in an overall load reduction on the engine and improves the vehicle's fuel economy.

Compact and Lightweight Battery Allowing for Increased OE Design Flexibility
The new battery pack is naturally air-cooled and therefore does not require a dedicated battery cooling system. Because there is no need for auxiliary cooling components, this allows the battery to be lighter and more compact. This enables automakers more design flexibility, which is important for vehicles with limited space.

DENSO Stop/Start Available Technology
DENSO has developed different types of starters to meet the specific needs of its customers for their stop/start systems, including the Advanced Engagement (AE) Starter, Permanently Engaged (PE) Starter, and Tandem Solenoid (TS) Starter. Also, DENSO developed a Cold Storage (CS) Evaporator which increases the effectiveness of idle-stop, particularly at high temperatures.

DENSO supplies the lithium ion battery pack, the TS starter and Cold Storage Evaporator on the Suzuki Wagon R, which Suzuki Motor Corporation launched to market earlier this month. DENSO will continue its efforts to expand these technologies to other automakers and other regions in the world.

About the Battery Pack Components

DENSO Battery management unit
DENSO Battery Management Unit monitors and controls the voltage of the lithium-ion battery cells to maintain the proper charge level to protect them from overcharge and over-discharge.

Power supply control switch
Depending on the operational status of the vehicle, this device controls the charging of the battery cells by the energy captured during deceleration and braking. It also controls the amount of power supplied to the car navigation, audio, and other systems during driving.

Battery cells
High-power rechargeable lithium-ion battery cells, which have a higher energy density and charge more quickly than lead-acid batteries, can efficiently store more regenerated power quickly to vehicle's electronic and electrical components.

DENSO Corporation, headquartered in Kariya, Aichi prefecture, Japan, is a leading global automotive supplier of advanced technology, systems and components in the areas of thermal, powertrain control, electric, electronics and information and safety. Its customers include all the world's major carmakers. Worldwide, the company has more than 200 subsidiaries and affiliates in 35 countries and regions (including Japan) and employs over 120,000 people. Consolidated global sales for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2012, totaled US$38.4 billion. Last fiscal year, DENSO spent 9.5 percent of its global consolidated sales on research and development. DENSO common stock is traded on the Tokyo and Nagoya stock exchanges. For more information, go to www.globaldenso.com, or visit our media website at www.densomediacenter.com.

* Dimensions: 200 × 178 × 70 mm (length × width × height)
Weight: 2.5 kg


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 23 Comments
      usbseawolf2000
      • 2 Years Ago
      This thing is only 5.5 lbs and it is replacing the 20-30 lbs lead acid battery.
      • 2 Years Ago
      It seems that this lithium ion battery pack is a supplementary part of a lead-acid start-stop battery.
      • 2 Years Ago
      As an auto repair shop in GAithersburg MD owner and master mechanic we always watch what's new in the auto market place. Thank you for sharing this information and for people in Gaithersburg MD area who owns a Suzuki and are looking for Suzuki auto repair please visit us at http://georgesautohospital.com
      EVnerdGene
      • 2 Years Ago
      creates ? like in - out of thin air ? like in - poof ? How about develops ?
      • 2 Years Ago
      What is the cell supplier. Did denso make it in house?
      BipDBo
      • 2 Years Ago
      "The 5.5-pound battery pack weighs less because it can capture regenerative energy from when the vehicle slows down and feed that power the alternator when the car is idling and the engine is shut off. " Dafuq I just read?
      HVH20
      • 2 Years Ago
      They are only using 3 cells which tells me they are using an NMC chemistry and not LFP.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @HVH20
        How can get this conclusion? 3 cells in series to obtain 12V? But 12V is the norminal voltage, the norminal of voltage of an NMC cell is 3.6-3.7V.
      oktrader
      • 2 Years Ago
      DENSO just keeps rounding off the sharp edges of vehicle electrification challenges, and helping everything to fit into place. Over the past year, the number of little things (that all add up to big success) have been impressive: smaller heat exchangers, smaller (AND more efficient) a/c motor/compressor packaging, thermal storage subsystems, V2H solutions that actually make sense, and on and on. Just cranking out neat stuff that simplifies the electrification process for OEMs, one step at a time. Good show, DENSO.
      • 2 Years Ago
      And what about ultracapacitors? I think other manufacturers are already using them for such things like stop-start systems. Ultracapacitors have the advantage of an almost unlimited life cycle. http://goo.gl/eSs1s
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 2 Years Ago
        ultracapacitors might be the key forward. Would be nice to not worry about batteries anymore.
          MTN RANGER
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          Why not a combination of ultracapacitors and batteries in a vehicle? Each has their strengths and situations where they are appropriate.
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          That is what Peugeot/Valeo/Maxwell use.
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          Either lithium or capacitors should be OK to do the job, as long as the lithium batteries have a high C rate and so can store more of the energy from braking than has been the case with AGMs. It never hurts to have two decent solutions competing. I would not fancy the stop start in the VW's and others which rely on lead acid AGM.
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          http://www.greencar.com/articles/valeo-stars-x-hybrid-start-stop-system.php
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        Peugeot is using Maxwell supercapacitors in their Valeo system
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 2 Years Ago
      Looks like a DC-DC converter ( or voltage regulator ) paired with a BMS and a super high discharge battery chemistry. These could be produced for $100-$300 in mass quantities and the battery replacement itself could maaaaybe run $100 tops.. I think this is one of the few recent engine technologies that could really pay off, and i'm a bit surprised that we don't have this on all cars already.
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        Most lithium chemistries don't like the cold much. The latest A123 one is fine though: http://www.a123systems.com/lithium-ion-battery-technology.htm If only they had these in the Leaf..... As for why no take off, lead acid is still cheap, so they just used a beefed up version, the AGM. Hopefully with it's other advantages lithium or capacitors will take over now.
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 2 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        Depends on the chemistry. If you oversize or overspec the C rate, they can be very happy in the cold. Those ions get movin! 10-15AH of lithium battery could do the job of 50AH of lead acid battery just fine. It could be cheaper or at least cost competitive compared to a car battery - if produced in large quantities anyway! For kicks, check out 'LiPo battery integra engine cranking test' on youtube. There's a video of a guy i know starting an Acura Integra off a little 1/2 pound 3 cell 4AH battery. Also for kicks look up 'rc battery starts dragster' :)
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        I'm not too enthused by stop/start using AGM batteries, which is the most common type and is produced by Johnson Controls. They don't have the durability of capacitors, and probably some chemistries of lithium, and so could easily land people with a pretty substantial battery replacement bill.
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 2 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        AGM definitely needs to go. A 4 cell A123 battery can do the job better in every way, longer life, better output, 1/3rd the weight per watt hour, and given that you don't need as large of a battery, possibly price competitive as well. I wonder why the A123 lead acid battery replacements haven't taken off yet.
      DaveMart
      • 2 Years Ago
      Its always good to see lead taken out of the environment. It is still killing a lot of people in the third world.
    • Load More Comments
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