Honda
has followed in the water-exhaust trail of fellow Japanese automakers Toyota and Nissan as well as South Korea-based Hyundai in reaching an agreement to accelerate the development of hydrogen fuel-cell electric vehicles (FCEV) in the Nordic countries.

Honda joined in on the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with representatives from Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Iceland. The agreement, signed recently in Copenhagen, specifically targets FCEV refueling infrastructure development from 2014 and 2017.

The countries involved have been pushing for FCEV development for at least a couple of years. In February 2011, Hyundai and its Kia affiliate reached its own MOU with the Nordic countries to speed up the vehicle-development process. Some say FCEVs are a "best of both worlds" solution to cutting greenhouse gas emissions because they emit nothing but water vapor and can go about as far as a conventional vehicle on a full tank. One stumbling block is building out an refueling infrastructure, which this MOU addresses. You can find the press release below.

Honda is leasing the FCX Clarity (pictured) in limited numbers the U.S. and Japan, and was the first automaker to make FCEVs available to the public with the launch of the FCX in 2002.
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Honda Signs MoU on Market Introduction of Fuel Cell Vehicles in Nordic Countries

Today in Copenhagen Honda, along with Toyota, Nissan, and Hyundai, signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with organisations from the Nordic Countries supporting the market introduction of fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) and hydrogen refuelling infrastructure between 2014 and 2017, further highlighting Honda's commitment to fuel cell electric vehicles as the ultimate zero emission technology.

Honda has been engaged in fuel cell Research & Development since the mid 1980s and has been at the forefront of the industry in both R&D and sales of this technology. Last month Honda announced an all-new fuel cell electric model for Japan, the U.S. and Europe to be launched from 2015. This new vehicle will showcase further technological advancements and significant cost reductions.

The MoU signed today seeks to generate dialogue with public and private stakeholders in Norway, Sweden, Iceland and Denmark on accelerating the market introduction of FCEVs and follows an agreement signed by car manufacturers in Europe in 2009 which identified 2015 as a potential point for market introduction in regions where hydrogen refuelling is available.

Commenting on Honda's involvement in this project, Ken Keir, Executive Vice President, Honda Motor Europe said, "In 2002 Honda became the world's first carmaker to put a fuel cell car on the road with regular customers, delivering the Honda FCX to fleet users in the United States and Japan. We want to continue to lead the way for fuel cell technology across the world including Europe. This MoU signifies that commitment."

The MoU was signed in the presence of the Danish Minister for Transport and the Director of the International Energy Agency, directorate of Sustainable Energy Policy and Technology at the 3GF conference in Copenhagen.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 22 Comments
      Jeff
      • 1 Day Ago
      Looking forward to this... hope to purchase one! Gas prices are unacceptable... I did a little research and came across and interesting video link below... Just wanted to share it. "New fuel cell sewage gas station in Orange County, CA may be world's first" http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/story?section=news/local/orange_county&id=8310315 "It is here today and it is deployable today," said Tom Mutchler of Air Products and Chemicals Inc., a sponsor and developer of the project.
        Chris M
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Jeff
        If you're expecting a big savings on your fuel bill, then don't look to hydrogen. At best, it might end up similar to current gasoline prices on a cost-per-mile basis, and somewhat less than 2015 gasoline prices. The real money saver is electricity, with a per-mile cost about 1/3 to 1/4 current gasoline prices. There are several models of plug-in cars available now, with models from every major auto maker available by 2015. By "plug-in cars" I mean both battery EVs and plug-in hybrids.
          DaveMart
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Chris M
          Re-reading, my tone is too harsh, but the economic facts remain the same.
          DaveMart
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Chris M
          And where did you invent that fact from? The worst, not the best case scenarios from the likes of the DOE put the cost of the hydrogen at around the same per mile as gasoline cars, but wholly eliminating point of use pollution, so saving countless lives of city dwellers. Directly contrary to your claims, at best it comes to something like half the current cost of petrol per mile, excluding taxes. So if health is properly costed, then on any reckoning hydrogen is far more economic. The inherent simplicity of a hydrogen fuel cell car, like all electric vehicles, also means that maintenance costs should be way lower after the technology has matured. So the real cost range, contrary to your claims, is from cheaper to much cheaper, not 'about the same' as you falsely say.
          goodoldgorr
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Chris M
          It's better to harness sewages as it depollute the sewages and on top of that it replace dirty gasoline so it's a 2 x increase in efficiency. The limitation on batteries is you cannot always recharge them so it limit the efficiencies with a lot of downtime. For the hydrogen we see 100% efficiency as you can make hydrogen in that facility 24/7 with no downtime as you can stock it while you do it and you refill a car in 5 minutes.
      goodoldgorr
      • 1 Day Ago
      They can put, in my view, this hydrogen infrastructure into the car instead of following the old similar external refueling system like the actual gasoline infrastructure. Put a small water electrolyzer into the car and refill the hydrogen tank, no need for a bothersome, costly , time consuming hydrogen infrastructure. If they don't do so, some specialized independant technicians will install themself these small hydrogen maker into the car and again car manufacturers will be guilty of not taking care of their own customers and send then to the nearest fuel exploitant.
        Spec
        • 1 Day Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        To defend gorr a little bit . . . . early on in the fuel cell mania of the early 90s, some people thought that they might be able fill a car with gasoline (or something like that), transform the gasoline into something that fuel cells could use on-board, and then use the fuel cell. Thus, fuel cells would operate using gasoline but they would operate with a fuel cell not an ICE. But they soon realized that you couldn't convert gasoline into something that a fuel cell could operate on and thus abandoned the idea. They then moved to hydrogen fuel cells and the whole fuel cell idea was very as good due to the lack of a hydrogen source, the difficulties of storing hydrogen, the difficulties of transporting hydrogen, etc.
        goodoldgorr
        • 1 Day Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        At 20:54 min of this jules verne video they said to make hydrogen gas for energy from sea water, this was in the 19th century. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ST2ytiMYZVI
        GoodCheer
        • 1 Day Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        Really? How many years has it been that folks here have been explaining to you how that makes no sense?
          Chris M
          • 1 Day Ago
          @GoodCheer
          About as long as Gorr has been posting here, which is - too long. But Gorr is our lovable eccentric, his naive belief in a magical world where the normal laws of physics don't apply, well, it's very entertaining...
        Spec
        • 1 Day Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        So what powers the water electrolyzer? Mr. Fusion?
      Dave
      • 1 Day Ago
      "Air Products Dedicates World’s Largest Hydrogen Plant and Pipeline System October 23, 2012 Stretching from the Houston Ship Channel in Texas to New Orleans, Louisiana, Air Products (NYSE: APD), the leading global hydrogen provider, today held a dedication ceremony for what is the world’s largest hydrogen plant and pipeline supply network. Air Products had operated two hydrogen pipeline systems in Texas and Louisiana before joining them with a new 180-mile segment. Air Products’ Gulf Coast Connection Pipeline (GCCP) is now able to provide hydrogen to customers along the 600-mile pipeline span from over 20 hydrogen production facilities. " http://www.airproducts.com/company/news-center/2012/10/1023-air-products-dedicates-worlds-largest-hydrogen-plant-and-pipeline-system.aspx
      • 1 Day Ago
      I have filled at that station. H2 from sewage. It can be done!
        DaveMart
        • 1 Day Ago
        I have put down a small deposit on the next sewage to hydrogen plant!
      EZEE
      • 1 Day Ago
      1.2 gigiwatts! Great Scott!
      Letstakeawalk
      • 1 Day Ago
      Can't wait to see Honda's next-gen Clarity.
      Marcopolo
      • 1 Day Ago
      @ Spec The Patented Gorr Mark 11, Hydrogalizer-fussionator ! Get a grip, Spec ! I thought everyone knew of this amazing development !
      Spec
      • 1 Day Ago
      If Honda really wanted to join the fuel cell effort wouldn't the obvious thing for them to do is start selling fuel cell cars?
        krona2k
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Spec
        They couldn't possibly do that old chap, 2016 remember!
        DaveMart
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Spec
        'As for fuel cell electric vehicles, which Honda considers to be the ultimate environmentally-responsible vehicle, and therefore has been leading the industry in R&D and sales, Honda will launch an all-new fuel cell electric model sequentially in Japan, the U.S. and Europe starting in 2015. This new fuel cell vehicle will showcase further technological advancement and significant cost reduction that Honda has accomplished.' http://www.hondanews.info/news/en/corporate/c120921aeng They are no doubt reducing the precious metals content, and increasing durability. The Hyundai and Toyota stacks are a lot more advanced than the old ones in the leased FCV Honda has on the road. Fuel cell technology is moving fast.
          krona2k
          • 1 Day Ago
          @DaveMart
          I meant 2015 but what's a year between friends?
      Spec
      • 1 Day Ago
      Maybe a battery powers the water electrolyzer? ;-)
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