Italian motorcycle manufacturer Moto Guzzi has announced a new line of V7 bikes, which will be available to Euro-leaning shoppers in the U.S.

Moto Guzzi calls the 2013 iteration of the V7 a "completely new bike," with a more powerful version of the company's 90-degree V-twin engine and revamped aesthetics for each model. The traditional double-cradle frame and drive shaft remain, however.

To start, the Italian company will offer the V7 in three distinct flavors: the V7 Stone, V7 Racer and V7 Special. The Stone has the lowest price point at $8,390 to start, and is made to appeal to a younger buyers with its clean design and ample customization options. The V7 Racer clearly has been aimed at the retro-loving rider, as it makes use of old school number plates on the cowl and rear fenders, while rocking a vintage chrome tank and suede seat. The Racer is also the most dear, at $9,990 to start. Finally the V7 Special fills the need for a classically inspired touring bike with a large, 5.8-gallon tank (offering an average range of 310 miles) and available add-ons like luggage bags and a proper windshield. MSRP for the Special is $8,990.

The V7 Racer will be the first of the new range to show up at your local motorcycle emporium, with delivery slated for early October. The Stone will arrive a little later in the month, and the V7 Special should be available in the first quarter of 2013.
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MOTO GUZZI V7 RANGE CHANGES EVERYTHING YET REMAINS FAITHFUL TO ITS HERITAGE

New engine, revamped design, and new components: a new chapter in the V7 legend is written

THE NEW MOTO GUZZI V7: AN EVOLUTION THAT RESPECTS TRADITION
Over 90 years as Europe's oldest continuously operating motorcycle manufacturer makes Moto Guzzi's V7 lineup the most unique among today's modern retro motorcycles. With an unwavering commitment to craftsmanship, unrivaled old school style, and technological progress, every V7 is dashing to the eye and thrilling to the heart.

Today the success of Moto Guzzi is further enriched by renewing the flagship V7 product range; keeping constant the authentic elements and values that have characterized the brand so far:

• Craftsmanship
• Italian spirit
• Legendary heritage
• Originality

The 2013 Moto Guzzi V7 is a completely new bike – leading with a more powerful, faster, smoother 90° V-twin engine. Yet, it is still driven by the cardan shaft drive and supported by the double cradle "Tonti" frame – cornerstones of the V7 tradition, a tradition that stays true to the characteristics of the Moto Guzzi tradition, that touring on a motorcycle at its most pure should be nothing but enjoyable.

The design aesthetic accentuates the fine Italian craftsmanship of a vehicle that can only be made 100% in Italy. These are the distinctive elements of a V7 tradition which was born in 1967 with the creation of the Moto Guzzi V7 700. And in this tradition we welcome the 2013 Moto Guzzi V7 Range, three different versions and a wide range of available accessories that meet the various needs of all riders.

V7 Stone
A completely new version designed to appeal to younger riders, complete with a competitive price point; trendy, agile, easy to customize with an array of accessories. The V7 Stone features the new and more powerful, 750cc, 90-degree V-Twin motor and new lightweight, six split-spoke alloy wheels. The simple color scheme combined with the six split spoke wheels enhance the chrome accents and make the Stone the ideal foil for a wide variety of Moto Guzzi accessories. The matte black or pure white tank and the chrome accents make the V7 Stone a showstopper on the road or at any café, bike night or local hot spot. The 2013 V7 Stone is available in Matte Black and Pure White. MSRP is $8,390 and will be available in mid- October at Moto Guzzi dealerships across the United States.

V7 Racer
The 2013 V7 Racer is an ode to café racer motorcycles from the '50s and '60s with the performance of a modern machine. The V7 Racer has a new 750cc, 90-degree V-Twin motor with increased torque, horsepower and throttle response for an enjoyable ride. The new V7 Racer features a myriad of unique style attributes-from a chrome fuel metal tank studded with red Moto Guzzi badges and finished with a handsome leather strap, to a suede leather seat with an aerodynamic seat cowl and '70s-style racer number plates. The V7 Racer is perfect for an adventurous rider with an eye for design and a wild streak. The 2013 V7 Racer is available in Chrome. MSRP is $9,990 and will be available at Moto Guzzi dealerships across the United States in early-October.

V7 Special
This is the closest to the original 1969 V7 Special, not only because it shares its name with the first V7 signed by Lino Tonti, but because it faithfully cites the same riding philosophy - that of a touring bike with a sophisticated fit and finish and uniquely "Guzzi" engine character. The new engine, significantly stronger in driving torque and especially in maximum power, which is increased by 12%, is perfectly suited for medium range touring and contributes to low fuel consumption and greater tank capacity with 5.8 gallons for an average range of 310 miles.
Just like its predecessor, it is wrapped in a two-tone paint scheme and equipped with aluminum spoked wheels reducing unsprung weight and improving handling. The V7 Special proves a worthy touring machine with bags and windshield, accessories which go well with the overall design of the V7 Special. The V7 Special is available in White/Red Metallic and Yellow/Black Metallic. MSRP is $8,990 and will be available in quarter 1 of 2013 at Moto Guzzi dealerships across the United States.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 35 Comments
      XJ Yamaha
      • 2 Years Ago
      Not gonna lie, I like the styling of the Racer edition, they just need to take off those ridiculous looking 7s.
      slap
      • 2 Years Ago
      I rode around 50K miles when I was younger. Haven't ridden in ages, but when I went to a motorcycle dealership, all I saw were either pseudo Harleys, full blown tourers, or highway rockets. Nothing really caught my eye. But that v7 in the left in the picture above? Yeah. That's what I would like.
      guinnessfanatic
      • 2 Years Ago
      Gawdam those are sexy. I've heard rumors BMW is FINALLY bringing back something resembling a classic R, but until then or the Japanese realize the classics are back Guzzi and Triumph continue to climb in my book.
      acefecto
      • 2 Years Ago
      i remember when real riders were concerned about how things worked not how things looked... ya i know im a dinosaur but you yongsters will learn theres a lot more to riding than how your reflection looks as you ride in front of the store windows. blippin the throttle under overpasses and swerving in and out of traffic doin on ramp wheelstands. over a million miles under my belt all i see is someone tryin to look like something hes not. i realize all you wannabees and yuppies think dressing up makes it so but honestly these bikes look like the real deal. nare nones nack to basics. real bikes for real riders simple aint it
      sssperf
      • 2 Years Ago
      GREAT NEWS Bought a new V7 in 1973 from a small dealer in South Jersey and enjoyed it for years. Adapted the Craven rack and detachable saddle bags(fiberglass/top openning model) put on a tank bag and toured the USA for three weeks only problem was a burned out front turn signal bulb. Was an very easy bike to ride fast through the twisty turnys. Just great memories and adventures with "GARBONZO". Nice they ressurected such a classic that was so rider friendly and the best looking bike at the time. JD in Tucson AZ
      disngaj
      • 2 Years Ago
      I've always liked Guzzi's longitudinal, 90 degree V-twins, with both cylinders in the wind stream, like BMW's boxers, but with nicer the aesthetics. 'Seems like the dealer network in the U.S. is almost non-existent, though, along with parts problems. I hope the cash infusion from Piaggio can turn this company around.
      Shiftright
      • 2 Years Ago
      Bring on more Italian vehicles!
      IOMTT
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hard to justify one of these when the new Griso 8V is not much more than the V7 and looks a ton better in my opinion. Not to mention the Griso sports more than twice the Hp of the V series. The v series needs more engine please.
        XJ Yamaha
        • 2 Years Ago
        @IOMTT
        It's all a matter of what you're looking for. You think people buying Honda Rebels are cross shopping a Yamaha Vmax?
        Nick Allain
        • 2 Years Ago
        @IOMTT
        I agree with XJ Yamaha. The Griso 8V is nice looking but it's not nearly as retro and it has twice the HP (100hp vs 50hp). As a rather new ride, I know I'd much rather have the V7.
          IOMTT
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Nick Allain
          You should check out the Griso SE...it has the retro flair, perhaps not as much as the V7. I get the new rider thing, but getting bored of an underpowered bike is not fun and depreciation is a killer. $3K or so buys you better brakes, suspension, and at least 60 HP in hand. If you are a new rider, I would stick with used bikes until you know riding is something for you. I started when I was 18 with a barn find and now 25 years and over 60 cycles later, I still love it. By the way, my first new bike was a 92 GSXR 1100 and I lived after jumping in the deep end. I just had massive respect for it. I never was bored and so glad I did not buy a 600.
        Quen47
        • 2 Years Ago
        @IOMTT
        Walked into the Guzzi dealership in San Francisco, sat on a v7 and fell in love. Love the classic style and perfect riding position and ergos (for me anyway) of the v7. Just can't get into the Griso's look or feel at all. For the same price I'd take the v7 any day of the week, and I can't imagine people cross shop those two bikes. The v7's competition is the Bonneville, not the Speed Triple or Monster.
        Quen47
        • 2 Years Ago
        @IOMTT
        Walked into the Guzzi dealership in San Francisco, sat on a v7 and fell in love. Love the classic style and perfect riding position and ergos (for me anyway) of the v7. Just can't get into the Griso's look or feel at all. For the same price I'd take the v7 any day of the week, and I can't imagine people cross shop those two bikes. The v7's competition is the Bonneville, not the Speed Triple or Monster.
        Quen47
        • 2 Years Ago
        @IOMTT
        Love the classic style of the v7. Just can't get into the Griso's look at all. For the same price I'd take the v7 any day of the week, and I can't imagine people cross shop those two bikes.
      atltv
      • 2 Years Ago
      Oh great..more noisy death traps speeding around cars.
      rkeeeballs
      • 2 Years Ago
      Looks like the heat from the cylinders are going to really warm or burn the legs. Styling looks like it came from the 1960's........Compared to todays offerings...this will not sell in the USA !
        beezupdennis
        • 2 Years Ago
        @rkeeeballs
        "Styling looks like it came from the 1960's........Compared to todays offerings...this will not sell in the USA !" You might be right, rkeeeballs, that it won't dominate the withering U.S. newbike market, but it won't be because of styling or jugheat. A lot of OGs dig that bicycle-with-a-motor look, and the fact that the motor has big, identifiale motor chunks in plain view. Da youts might buy cheap, or crazyfast Asian bikes, but there's still a significant bunch of reliable buyers that are happy with a comfortable, mod-con equipped, good-looking retrobike that'll sound like a motorcycle but only do 90 or 95 in the quarter... witness Triumph and H-D's steady buyers. Styling from the 60s is a damn fine thing compared to the angry angle-vented painted plastic, and waterpump widgets, and fugly mufflers of the 90s and forward. Folks who buy these bikes plan on looking at 'em for 10 years or more... they're mellow mood-management tools, rewards, trophies, not ephemeral tradeoffs. What's going to limit market penetration is dealer convenience. In the Chicago area, I can't even find a Gootzi dealer.
      Sekinu2
      • 2 Years Ago
      Those are some ugly bikes. Look like ugly dacattis.
        Ducman69
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Sekinu2
        The fug is a dacatti? *smacks on the back of the head*
      Weston's
      • 2 Years Ago
      Just looks old to me.
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