You won't say it, but we will.

That's what the Electric Drive Transportation Association (EDTA) appears to be saying in a response to a Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report on electric-drive vehicle incentives and their effect on vehicle sales.

While the CBO report stayed away from estimating what percentage of plug-in purchases stemmed from federal tax incentives, the EDTA made sure to highlight the idea that "tax incentives can help move electric drive into the mainstream and reduce gasoline use and emissions."

The CBO said in a report released Thursday that the federal government will spend about $7.5 billion on policies that will promote electric-drive vehicles, and that about a quarter of that amount will go directly towards vehicle-purchase tax credits. The federal government gives a tax credit worth up to $7,500 to those who buy plug-ins such as the Nissan Leaf, Chevrolet Volt or Toyota Prius Plug-In.

Pro- and anti-alt-fuel vehicle incentive rhetoric is heating up in advance of November's presidential election. Earlier this month, the Carnegie Endowment published a paper saying that electric-drive vehicle sales momentum is dependent on federal and local government incentives. Meanwhile, publications such as Forbes have been slamming the federal government for providing direct and indirect financial support towards sales of the Chevrolet Volt, which the publication recently termed a "scam."

We've got the EDTA statement below.
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Electric Drive Transportation Association Responds to CBO Report on Federal Tax Credits for Electric Vehicle Purchases
Thursday, September 20, 2012

For immediate release

Washington, D.C.-Brian Wynne, president of the Electric Drive Transportation Association (EDTA), issued the following statement in response to today's release of the Congressional Budget Office's (CBO) September 2012 report, "Effects of Federal Tax Credits for the Purchase of Electric Vehicles."

"The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report 'Effects of Federal Tax Credits for the Purchase of Electric Vehicles' can be another useful contribution to the conversation on the benefit of investment in electric drive. It is important to highlight, however, some of the report's acknowledged limitations. In evaluating the effectiveness of the credit, the report provides the caveat that 'As yet, no reliable estimates exist of the share of electric vehicle sales that can be attributed to the tax credits.'

"EDTA agrees that economies of scale and ongoing technological advances will reduce vehicle costs and consumer tax incentives can help achieve them. While we do not agree with all of the assumptions made and relied on in the report, CBO's illustrations do show that tax incentives can help move electric drive into the mainstream and reduce gasoline use and emissions, while growing the industry. A strong public-private investment in the emerging electric drive industry can provide important energy security, economic and environmental benefits to the U.S."


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  • 30 Comments
      Nick
      • 2 Years Ago
      Joeviocoe I completely disagree. Bicycles could be used for AT LEAST 50% of all trips...since most car trips are less than 10 miles. As far as cargo.....a tricycle or a bicycle with a trailer can carry hundreds of pounds of cargo. Go to Asia and see what people carry on their cycles........I saw one carrying a huge sofa !
      Rick
      • 2 Years Ago
      We have almost the same incentives in the UK, yes it has helped the few buy electric car buyers. Would they have still have brought the electric car in the UK with out incentives probably yes as they are that kind of person. With 30 Electric Car UK sales (Sales down -11% from 34 sales in August 2011) in August 2012, yep they like the incentives but the big question is anybody really interested in buying them in big numbers? 3,700,000 in contrast brought 2 wheeled cycles proper zero emission transport last year in the UK in the race to be the greenest on the planet first past the post, the No1 greenie machine. How many of Obama's growing number 47% brought EV's last year?
        Spec
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Rick
        "Would they have still have brought the electric car in the UK with out incentives probably yes" No, you are just making that up. Go ask them.
      Rick
      • 2 Years Ago
      Bike to work scheme is a massive success in the UK, proper zero emission, very cheap affordable transport, keeps you healthier and wealthier. BIKE TO WORK Using the Bike to Work scheme, your employer can help you obtain a brand new bike and safety equipment worth up to £1,000 pounds. You can use a salary sacrifice arrangement to hire for the bike monthly which means you can save up to 42% of the retail price of bike and equipment. http://www.biketowork.co.uk/?gclid=CMToxqOwy7ICFcUPfAod9hsAEQ
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Rick
        Please join me in reporting Rick for abuse in repetitively posting on and on about bikes on an auto forum.
        Nick
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Rick
        I'm with Rick.....we too often forget that the geenest way of moving around is on a bicycle.
      Rick
      • 2 Years Ago
      Thats because folk brought 100,000,000s of them, 30 heavily discounted UK Electric Vehicle sales in August won't bring down EV prices, nobody ever gave me $7,500 discounts to buy my 42 in TV where is the logic? Nobody ever got any government incentives to buy big screen TVs they sold on merit.
      Letstakeawalk
      • 2 Years Ago
      No, it isn't. E-Bikes are more efficient than pedalling. Two-Wheeled Menace said so.
      EZEE
      • 2 Years Ago
      Shame! (Dave lowers head...Rick has finger pointing righteously)
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 2 Years Ago
      tax breaks, industry protectionism, and oil wars have been doing a great job of spurring the sale of oil and gasoline cars as well. IMHO we should work on removing that favoritism ( which is ultimately a subsidy on the taxpayer's dollar ) because it could help the developments of alternatives more than anything else.
      Rick
      • 2 Years Ago
      Letstakeawalk, Two-Wheel Menace has a point l work with folk that are looking at e-bikes as a way as using bikes everyday to get home from work, they can do the the 28 mile cycle trip into work, but are normally feel to tired at the end of he day to cycle home on their road bike, an E bike fits the 28 mile trip back home well. If they leave their BMW & Merc's at home then its gotta be better for the environment and congestion on the roads, Don't know what Dave Mart is complaining about are the British Prime Minister & Mayor of London both "Abusers" that abuse the environment because they cycle into work everyday without the need of a 1 MPG bullet proof stretch limo for their daily commute into work in London?
      Rick
      • 2 Years Ago
      LOL proper zero emission transport is abuse, call yourself green shame on you?
      EZEE
      • 2 Years Ago
      The Prius C is under $20k. The tesla competes fine in its class.
      upstategreenie
      • 2 Years Ago
      big oil is dependent on tens of billions of taxpayer subsidies every year despite record year over year profits in the TRILLIONS by fu*(ing over consumers. where is the 'news' about that? I dont see it on nightly propaganda outlets.
        Actionable Mango
        • 2 Years Ago
        @upstategreenie
        I'm not sure what you are expecting, oil subsidies is not really a "nightly news" type of thing. However, I do read or hear about it frequently when it comes to political debates and analysis.
      Spec
      • 2 Years Ago
      Well I certainly would not have bought an EV w/o the tax credit. The point of the tax-credits is to get the EV market rolling. If you get enough people buying them then there will be innovation to reduce costs and mass market scale will be reached to reduce costs. The goal is to pass a tipping point from being a niche item to a mass market item such that costs drop. If your typical ICE econobox gas car was only built in the hundreds, it would be hugely expensive too!
        EZEE
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Spec
        Big screen tv's....$5000 a few years ago, now $500...
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