We know a fair number of details about the upcoming high-speed charging network for Tesla vehicles. What we don't know is what the chargers will look like. This will change Monday evening.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk recently Tweeted that that Supercharger unveiling will make it "feel like alien spaceships landed at highway rest stops," so that give us some indication of the design. We're not sure if those vertical supports in the image above are part of the station or not, but it's the teaser image on Tesla's website now, so we think it's likely.

As for the technical aspects, here are some of the things we already know:
  • A top-of-the-line 85-kWh battery pack will be able to be recharged in about an hour.
  • You will be able to get around three hours of driving during a 30-minute stop, and that will get better over time.
  • The capacity is "on the order of 100 kW."
  • There will be solar power involved (we had heard rumors of battery swaps, too, but then that kind of died down).
  • The network is intended to allow for long-distance drives and will require about 30 Superchargers to provide that capability along the U.S. continental coasts.
Musk recently told AutoblogGreen the reason for the proprietary network (other plug-in vehicles won't be able to use the special connector) was that, "the other charge systems don't have enough power and in order to really charge fast, the charger needs pretty advanced technology and it needs to exactly match the pack. It's got to be hand-in-glove."

The Supercharger will be unveiled, along with deployment plans that provide "a solution for the electric vehicle's long-distance road trip that only Model S* can achieve" on Monday, September 24, with a live webcast starting 8 p.m. PDT. You will be able to watch the event here.

*And not all Model S vehicles will be able to Supercharge, since the 40-kWh version was not designed for long trips, according to Musk.
Show full PR text
Tesla Motors To Unveil Much-Anticipated Tesla Supercharger

Tesla Motors, the California-based maker of Model S, will reveal the Tesla Supercharger and deployment plans, providing a solution for the electric vehicle's long-distance road trip that only Model S can achieve.

What: Tesla Supercharger Premiere
When: Monday, Sept. 24, 7:30 p.m. PDT

Where: Tesla Motors' Design Studio
Can't make it in person? A live webcast will begin at 8:00 p.m. PDT at http://www.teslamotors.com/supercharger

More on Tesla
Tesla Motors' goal is to accelerate the world's transition to electric mobility. Palo Alto, California-based Tesla designs and manufactures electric vehicles (EVs) such as the Tesla Roadster and Tesla Model S, as well as EV powertrain components for partners such as Toyota and Daimler.

With the most energy-dense battery pack in the industry and best-in-class aerodynamics, Model S has the longest range of any production electric car in the world. Model S comes with three battery options to fit the unique needs of different drivers. The 85 kWh Model S has been certified by the U.S. EPA with a range of 265 miles*, giving it the best electrical vehicle range in the industry.

Model S is the first premium sedan designed from the ground up to take full advantage of electric vehicle architecture. A revolutionary powertrain sits under the floorboard of Model S, creating an ultra-low center of gravity. Paired with an aluminum body engineered for superior handling, Tesla has created a vehicle that raises the bar for performance and efficiency while meeting the highest standards for safety.

Without an internal combustion engine or transmission tunnel, the interior of Model S has more cargo space than any other sedan in its class and includes a second trunk under the hood. Model S seats five adults and two children in optional rear-facing child seats. Model S Performance models accelerate from 0 to 60 mph in as little as 4.4 seconds. The interior features a 17" in-dash touchscreen with internet capabilities, allowing for streaming radio, web browsing and navigation.

For more information about Tesla, please visit: http://www.teslamotors.com

*Using the EPA's 5-cycle test


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 63 Comments
      purrpullberra
      • 2 Years Ago
      I am wondering about how much range the 60kWh battery pack I'll get in 30 minutes. It seems that it would be different than the 85kWh pack so which distance are they going to use to space out the supercharger? Is the smaller pack gong to need to charge for more than 30 minutes to get enough juice to get to the next supercharger? It seems not so clear. I wonder when they'll tell us....
      Joeviocoe
      • 2 Years Ago
      "the other charge systems don't have enough power and in order to really charge fast, the charger needs pretty advanced technology and it needs to exactly match the pack. It's got to be hand-in-glove." If popular enough, we'll see if hackers can reprogram or build a device to trick the Supercharger into thinking the car is a Tesla. -Power Phreakers
      Doug
      • 2 Years Ago
      We enhanced the photo here: http://www.teslamotorsclub.com/showthread.php/10218-First-look-at-the-Supercharger?p=187318&viewfull=1#post187318
        Joeviocoe
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Doug
        Can't be the final design. Everyone knows that solar panels are most effective tilting 30 degrees, not that measly 10 degrees.
          BipDBo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          The angle depends on where you are. The angle should match your latitude.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          As BipDBo points out, Joeviocoe seems to not realize that the Earth isn't flat.
          Rotation
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          anne: The math just doesn't work that way. A solar panel can convert no more energy into electricity than falls on the panel. The amount of light that falls on the panel is proportional to the apparent size of the panel when viewed from the direction the sunlight is coming from. Think of it by looking at a TV in front of you. Look at the size it appears to be, i.e. the silhouette (outline) of it from your view angle. Now move more to the side of it, it gets smaller, if you walk 90 degrees off from it, it becomes a sliver and disappears. It is largest when viewed from directly in front. Now think of yourself as emitting light instead of receiving it. If you were the sun and "shining" on the TV, then more of your light would hit the surface of the TV when you are directly in front of it than when you are far off angle. The ideal angle for solar panels to capture the most light is your latitude. If you want more power in the summer at the expense of power in the winter (perhaps for A/C or because you are selling power into the grid and they buy it at a higher rate in the summer) then the ideal angle can be lower, presumably up to 23 degrees lower (latitude of the Tropic of Cancer).
          Kellan O'Connor
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          http://www.macslab.com/optsolar.html Check this out for a great explanation. Always best to be informed. Also, If the design (or designer) calls for a flat sleek look, it is okay, in some conditions, to keep the tilt low (like 10 deg.). The loss of insolation will not be effected so much since we get the best sunlight in the afternoon... Hope this helps.
          Kellan O'Connor
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          http://www.macslab.com/optsolar.html Check this out for a great explanation. Always best to be informed. Also, If the design (or designer) calls for a flat sleek look, it is okay, in some conditions, to keep the tilt low (like 10 deg.). The loss of insolation will not be effected so much since we get the best sunlight in the afternoon... Hope this helps.
          Anne
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          Not correct, even in high latitudes as The Netherlands (52 degrees N), it seems pretty flat angles (15-20 degrees) offer the highest total yield over a year.
          Kellan O'Connor
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          http://www.macslab.com/optsolar.html Check this out for a great explanation. Always best to be informed. Also, If the design (or designer) calls for a flat sleek look, it is okay, in some conditions, to keep the tilt low (like 10 deg.). The loss of insolation will not be effected so much since we get the best sunlight in the afternoon... Hope this helps.
          Kellan O'Connor
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          http://www.macslab.com/optsolar.html Check this out for a great explanation. Always best to be informed. Also, If the design (or designer) calls for a flat sleek look, it is okay, in some conditions, to keep the tilt low (like 10 deg.). The loss of insolation will not be effected so much since we get the best sunlight in the afternoon... Hope this helps.
          Rotation
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          Solar trees (the things in parking lots) around here are tilted less than 10 degrees. But that is because they are grid tie and power is worth the most in the afternoon. For a standalone system like this, you would want to angle it according to your latitude.
          gpmp
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          Maybe the design isn't about maximizing solar production. Maybe it's about aesthetics. Since the station will be grid-tied, the solar panels aren't even really necessary.
          Kellan O'Connor
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          http://www.macslab.com/optsolar.html Check this out for a great explanation. Always best to be informed. Also, If the design (or designer) calls for a flat sleek look, it is okay, in some conditions, to keep the tilt low (like 10 deg.). The loss of insolation will not be effected so much since we get the best sunlight in the afternoon... Hope this helps.
          Joeviocoe
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          /sarcasm No? Damn, not quick enough?
      Joeviocoe
      • 2 Years Ago
      It's not a bug, it's feature. How else is ABG going to boost their advertising revenue unless it looks like they get a lot more traffic than they are. /jk
      Joeviocoe
      • 2 Years Ago
      It's not a bug, it's feature. How else is ABG going to boost their advertising revenue unless it looks like they get a lot more traffic than they are. /jk
      Kellan O'Connor
      • 2 Years Ago
      I hear there are some other surprises to be told that we don't know yet... Can't wait to see what it looks like. Is that SOLAR on top of the structure?!?!
        Anne
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Kellan O'Connor
        Yes, probably done by his 3rd company, SolarCity.
      Smith Jim
      • 2 Years Ago
      Five years from now the decision to use a non-standard charger and connector will seem like a brilliant idea or a total blunder.
        GoodCheer
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Smith Jim
        Or no big deal, since an adaptor J1772 -> Tesla or Tesla -> J1772 could be built about the size of a teacup.
      Ashton
      • 2 Years Ago
      can't wait to see it, and get a bunch more info on the whole shabang.
      purrpullberra
      • 2 Years Ago
      I am wondering about how much range the 60kWh battery pack I'll get in 30 minutes. It seems that it would be different than the 85kWh pack so which distance are they going to use to space out the supercharger? Is the smaller pack gong to need to charge for more than 30 minutes to get enough juice to get to the next supercharger? It seems not so clear. I wonder when they'll tell us....
        Domenick
        • 2 Years Ago
        @purrpullberra
        I expect the first 30 minutes of charging speed will be equal for both 60 and 85 kWh battery packs. Mostly. Charging slows down as it gets closer to full, so if you start charging from close to empty, the 60 kWh pack should still have some head room still after 30 mins. Of course, I could be wrong.
        GoodCheer
        • 2 Years Ago
        @purrpullberra
        I doubt they'll be more than 150 miles apart. Probably not more than 100 miles apart.
        Domenick
        • 2 Years Ago
        @purrpullberra
        I expect the first 30 minutes of charging speed will be equal for both 60 and 85 kWh battery packs. Mostly. Charging slows down as it gets closer to full, so if you start charging from close to empty, the 60 kWh pack should still have some head room still after 30 mins. Of course, I could be wrong.
        Domenick
        • 2 Years Ago
        @purrpullberra
        I expect the first 30 minutes of charging speed will be equal for both 60 and 85 kWh battery packs. Mostly. Charging slows down as it gets closer to full, so if you start charging from close to empty, the 60 kWh pack should still have some head room still after 30 mins. Of course, I could be wrong.
        Domenick
        • 2 Years Ago
        @purrpullberra
        I expect the first 30 minutes of charging speed will be equal for both 60 and 85 kWh battery packs. Mostly. Charging slows down as it gets closer to full, so if you start charging from close to empty, the 60 kWh pack should still have some head room still after 30 mins. Of course, I could be wrong.
      taser it
      • 2 Years Ago
      How is Tesla going to afford to implement this network when it has no cash and a huge debt load? Oh and what does this charge rate do to battery life?
      taser it
      • 2 Years Ago
      How is Tesla going to afford to implement this network when it has no cash and a huge debt load? Oh and what does this charge rate do to battery life?
        taser it
        • 2 Years Ago
        @taser it
        Sorry for the multiple posts. ABG is having comment submission problems.
        Anne
        • 2 Years Ago
        @taser it
        In line with good FUD tactics, these questions never had the purpose of making you any wiser. Even if you got answers from Musk and Straubel themselves, you would ignore them. Tesla will either be a smashing success or go up in a huge fireball. So just sit back, relax and enjoy the show.
      Rotation
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hmm, well this sort of solar infrastructure will make the system much cheaper to install in rest stations around the country. It also will severely limit the number of cars that can be charged in a day. For a solar array the size of a parking spot, less than one car per day could use it and that's on a sunny day. Obviously with limited availability your car will have to tell you if an upcoming station is available (charged) or not and hopefully let you reserve one. The good news about small stations like this is that Tesla can respond to sustained high demand in an area by simply putting in more stations. Match supply to demand.
        gpmp
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Rotation
        I don't understand why anyone would think these stations wouldn't be grid tied. I Elon is going to spend a million $ a pop, why not make it as versatile as possible? And wouldn't it make sense that a 2 or 4 car station be scalable to, say, 20 cars if the demand arises?
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