German publication AutoBild is reporting that the upcoming 2014 Porsche 911 Turbo, already set to be a technical tour de force, will offer all-wheel steering to go with standard all-wheel drive. Porsche hopes to increase the outright handling ability of the 991 Turbo via four-wheel steering, though no mention is made as to how the system will operate.

The new steering system is likely to join higher levels of power and performance, for an altogether more competent super 911 from the sports car company. We've already reported on rumors that the new Turbo could be outputting something like 550 horsepower from its force-fed 3.8-liter boxer six. That engine will supposedly be fitted with three turbochargers, too. Expect acceleration from 0 to 62 miles per hour to happen in close to 3.3 seconds, and for the top speed to touch 196 mph.

It'll be a year or so before Porsche debuts its new Turbo, with the first cars expected to make an appearance next spring as 2014 models.


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  • 58 Comments
      budwsr25
      • 2 Years Ago
      I want to see a 959 style car come back for rally racing.
        joejoe509
        • 2 Years Ago
        @budwsr25
        Lol. Ha ha fooled you all! This is a test mule for the new Camry Solara.
      jaycmoran
      • 2 Years Ago
      Amazing! Can't wait to pick one up. :)
        • 2 Years Ago
        @jaycmoran
        [blocked]
      recharged95
      • 2 Years Ago
      4 wheel steering? Sounds like a page from the GT-R notebook of years' past (not the new GT-R)..
        RudyH
        • 2 Years Ago
        @recharged95
        Who took a page prior to that from the Mazda 626 and Toyota Camry...
          ratpack
          • 2 Years Ago
          @RudyH
          i believe Nissan Skyline was first mass production car to use 4 wheel steering...(R31 models had it in 1985)
          Boost Retard
          • 2 Years Ago
          @RudyH
          1987 in Japan
          Boost Retard
          • 2 Years Ago
          @RudyH
          Who took a page from Honda and the Prelude 4WS from 1988
          Boost Retard
          • 2 Years Ago
          @RudyH
          I stand corrected, ratpack is correct about the R31 having HICAS when introduced for MY86 in 1985. Super HICAS wasn't intro'd til the R32/Z32 in '89. I'm pretty sure the Prelude was still the first 4WS car that offered active rear steer that opposed the direction of the front wheels, whereas original HICAS only steered the rear wheels in the same direction as the fronts, up to about 10 degrees. Super HICAS could steer the rear wheels both directions, although it only did this during mid-speed cornering, not at parking speeds like the Prelude would. A little research has led me to the fact that the Porsche 928 actually had passive rear steering when introduced in the 70's (look up "Weissach Axle").
          joejoe509
          • 2 Years Ago
          @RudyH
          I was going to say... I know that everyone in America associates 4WS (on a sports car) with the Prelude and the 3000GT, but I always thought Nissan was a pioneer in the rest of the world.
          ThinkAboutIt
          • 2 Years Ago
          @RudyH
          Who took a page out of the Nissan book in the section called 300zx 1989-2000 four wheel steering....
        joejoe509
        • 2 Years Ago
        @recharged95
        Exactly. I tbet that's what Porsche is thinking too.
        graphikzking
        • 2 Years Ago
        @recharged95
        Porsche History Lesson: The 1983 928 had passive rear steering using the Porsche's weissach axle. Instead of the steering wheel turning the rear wheels, it uses suspension geometry etc to "turn" the wheels to create a Passive 4 wheel steering. This was 29 years ago just to let you know. They are just developing a more advanced set-up now. The first 4ws vehicles were firetrucks and Jeeps back in 1905-1907 ish. Jeep has made 4ws vehicles for military for WW1 and WW2 as well. 4wd / awd / turbo etc are all available on multiple cars and it's hard to pinpoint 1 single car that "created the idea" but they all go back to the 1980's for sports cars. Honda Preludes even had it back then.
      PatrickH
      • 2 Years Ago
      If the 997 Turbo could hit 0-60 in 2.8 seconds logic would say that predicting a time of 3.3 for the new car is exceedingly conservative.
      jbm0866
      • 2 Years Ago
      I had a 90 Honda Prelude with 4WS...never really noticed it helping anything. Of course since this is Porsche, the German engineers will have a field day and make it overly complicated and expensive..
      kevin
      • 2 Years Ago
      pffffff Mitsubishi did this with the 3000GT how many years ago?? I always wondered though, if it were truly beneficial why hasn't it shown up more since then?
        Fixitfixitstop
        • 2 Years Ago
        @kevin
        Cost, probably.
        sparrk
        • 2 Years Ago
        @kevin
        Mercedes did this in the 1930s , i'm sure Porsche have found a way to make it work.
        miketim1
        • 2 Years Ago
        @kevin
        The GSFsport can also turn its rear wheels a bit for better turn in
        Carbon Fibre
        • 2 Years Ago
        @kevin
        R34 had this too ATTESA ETS
        Cory Stansbury
        • 2 Years Ago
        @kevin
        It was big in the 80s and early 90s. Cars that come to mind are the 3000GT/Stealth, Prelude, 626, and Rx7. My Rx7 used to have it, but I eliminated it, as it introduces slop in the rear end as you up the power.
        Dark Gnat
        • 2 Years Ago
        @kevin
        Didn't the Lamborghini Countach also have this?
          Dark Gnat
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dark Gnat
          Can't find anything about it, but I remember a Countach in a magazine that had 4-wheel steering. It looked odd, but apparently it was very maneuverable (for the time).
      RearDiff
      • 2 Years Ago
      All the effort and expense that goes into 4 wheel steering... is it really worth it? I mean, is it really worth paying that much more in order to make a tighter U turn? And/or does it really make the car handle THAT much better? Just starting to wonder if this is a gimmick more than benefit. It's been offered in the Honda Prelude years ago, pickup trucks, other sports cars... yet they drop the option b/c it's never been that popular.
        graphikzking
        • 2 Years Ago
        @RearDiff
        I'm sure their setup will be speed dependent. Tires will probably go in opposite direction under low speed to tighten the turn radius and at high speed they will turn the same direction to "pull" the car in line. I think it could be dynamite and probably shave off quite a few seconds on "the ring". I'm willing to go give my option - this car being lighter, 3rd turbo for less lag and 4ws will probably lose a solid 7-9 seconds off their ring time.
      Louis MacKenzie
      • 2 Years Ago
      It gets bigger and it gets heavier. 911 is getting closer to becoming a smaller Panamera.
        KaiserWilhelm
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Louis MacKenzie
        The new 911 is lighter than the previous model.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Louis MacKenzie
        [blocked]
      Nick Allain
      • 2 Years Ago
      Porsche will make the first car to outperform it's occupants into a thick goo.
      Fixitfixitstop
      • 2 Years Ago
      The current 5-series and 7-series have limited 4WS.
      Gorgenapper
      • 2 Years Ago
      What a gorgeous machine.
      Camster
      • 2 Years Ago
      Is this a sign that the engineers can no longer overcome the engine being in the wrong location with just a good chassis set up? Makes me wonder...imagine how good a min engined 911 would be! Which is of course what he wanted to build in the first place.
        A Danforth Wilkins
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Camster
        I truly believe that the successor to the 991 will be mid-engine...but to keep that iconic shape, wouldn't it only get wider and longer? And then everyone will complain how the 911 got to be such a softie. More questions than answers until we see this Turbo come out.
        joejoe509
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Camster
        You know 911's are mid-engined right? There's a big difference between front mid-engined and rear-mid engined. Rear mid-engined cars typically have better balance so I'm not really sure what you're getting at...
          AcidTonic
          • 2 Years Ago
          @joejoe509
          It's really an apples to oranges comparison..... You can drive a Viper within 2 inches of your life to get a 7:00 time around a fictional track. You can drive an AWD planted handling oriented GT-R to get a 7:00 time around a fictional track. You can drive a lightweight Lotus and have the fastest time through the smallest turns and still get a 7:00 time on this fictional track. You see where I'm going here? Sure the 911 has what appears to be infinite grip but it also has the quality of being rather fast to shift from what feels like total grip to none whatsoever at the limit without a progressive hint to the driver that *you need to let off or a wreck is imminent*. Just like some enjoy the feeling of flinging an overpowered V8 where one wrong throttle input mid corner could spell disaster, others enjoy the feeling of losing control and regaining it progressively in AWD cars like the GT-R. The 911 is like a blend of both. You have the planted GT-R mid-corner grip feeling and it switches to the V8 throttle-induced spin-out with little warning to the uneducated driver. Plus later cars have electronic goodies to help this classic issue. All sorts of ways to have fun around a track.... No need to pick one or argue about which is better. Apples and Oranges are both great and I eat both.
        Jonathan Arena
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Camster
        Um, if the could "no longer overcome the engine being in the wrong location", then they would just move it in front of the rear axle. Still, it's preferable to front engine.
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