Brad Albin, president of Iowa Renewable Fuels Association, and Joe Jobe, CEO of the National Biodiesel Board, were thrilled to see the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency approve a 28-percent increase in the amount of biodiesel that will be mandated for the nation's diesel engine vehicles in 2013. Up until last year, under the 2007 Renewable Fuels Act, biodiesel had been sort of a stepchild to ethanol. Ethanol enjoyed large mandates with the passage of that bill, but biodiesel was later added at 800 million gallons per year in 2011 and one billion in 2012. That number has been increased to 1.28 billion gallons for 2013.

"I want to thank President Obama and his staff for listening to our concerns and recognizing the value and potential of America's Advanced Biofuel – biodiesel," Albin said. National Biodiesel Board's Jobe said the increase "represents a modest increase from the industry's record production last year of nearly 1.1 billion gallons and puts the industry on course for steady, sustainable growth in the coming years."

The EPA noted that the biodiesel industry is already producing at a rate consistent with an annual volume of about 1.3 billion gallons. This is bigger than the recycled waste biodiesel of old. Bio-based diesel products are defined as being advanced biofuels derived from biomass sources that include vegetable oils and wastes oils from renewable sources. And there more and more of it.



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  • 19 Comments
      Rotation
      • 2 Years Ago
      Respect? It's a handout. Why are we mandating this at all, other than to hand the farmers a subsidy?
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Rotation
        Yup.. It's a bad idea too, because it will keep fuel prices low. That won't discourage consumption like high prices would. If biodiesel was cost competitive, it'd not need a handout. So just like with ethanol and oil wars, you are subsidizing fuel prices with your tax dollars. Yay for industrial socialism!
      Rick
      • 2 Years Ago
      Just watch food price inflation rocket, and US crops already failed. Only saving grace being Americans are one of the few counties in world that don't buy diesel cars. Total madness unless lets say diesel fuel prices dropped by a lot at the pump.
      Marcopolo
      • 2 Years Ago
      It would be nice if Jon LeSage, could do a little more than just copy an article from the Des Moines Register. Naturally, this is good news story for a newspaper in a farm state, but is the EPA 'mandating' any fuel additive a such a great idea ?. Biodiesel is produced from lot's of different products. While it's true that some biodiesel can be produced from used cooking oils, mostly biodiesel is produced from animal fats and crops at a totally uneconomic cost. With each fuel crisis, and jump in the price of oil, interest in Biodiesel increases. Huge Biodiesel infrastructure with massive is built, only to collapse once the crisis is over. To prop up the Bio-fuel industry, the US government has taken an unusual new maneuver, by mandating the percentage of Bio-fuel that must be included in fossil fuel. Arguments for the continued support of a very inefficient industry come in different guises. Clean air, reduction of imports, morally superior, climate change, etc. The elephant in the room is that biodiesel is very difficult to produce on a massive scale and it's completely uneconomic without government aid.. Rightly or wrongly, this is a decision by the US legislature, and endorsed by the electorate. It's a legitimate exercise of government power ! IMHO, biodiesel is great ! Buy a diesel hybrid, use only solar and biodiesel, and enjoy truly environmental motoring ! The only issue is one of economics. Biodiesel contributes only approximately 2% of the nations diesel, yet the investment required to achieve this miniscule gain is enormous. Environmentally, and economically, it would be better to sell cheap LPG (NG) as the fuel of choice for North America.
        Ford Future
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Marcopolo
        Putting a floor for sales of bio-diesel, building a guaranteed market, will attract venture capital. Then it becomes a capitalistic race to develop the cheapest method of production, in a safe economic incubator. Let this run for a few years, and possibly this could develop to be cheaper then earth-diesel. Look at wind, already cheaper then coal and natural gas, when you add in the volatility of natural gas pricing [ compare long term contracts for wind and natural gas ], and the cost of shipment [ wind is free ].
      Ford Future
      • 2 Years Ago
      What are they using for bio-diesel? Switch-grass?
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 2 Years Ago
      Sure, you'd feel respect for government if they basically supercharged your industry by forcing people to buy your product, too! I am going to lobby government to purchase stock in my "snarky internet comments" company.
        EZEE
        • 2 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        Prior to the cross linking, that would have warranted a -5, now you get a +3... In a sense it is disappointing. Open minded people on the left react with anger when people disagree, and I am concerned many of the 'standby' types may leave for more leftist pastures. I like hearing opposing sides of view, and on a green website, hearing, 'yay, more cylinders, eff yea, effing hippies!' really isn't why I am here. Of course, I could do without the comments about rebukes and idiots and tea baggers, but that is the price to pay when hanging with those on the left (except spec, he is usually pretty cool about it).
          Ford Future
          • 2 Years Ago
          @EZEE
          "Unfortunately, most of the interest in 'green' technology has waned" Where did you hear that? Limbaugh? Fox( 99% ) Lies? New wind installation this year is 10X greater then last year.
          Marcopolo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @EZEE
          @ Ezee, I agree, cross linking has not proved very productive in raising the intellectual quality of the comments. Unfortunately, most of the interest in 'green' technology has waned. The entire environmental movement has become mired in ideology. Those people who were interested in optimistic new solutions and the exiting new opportunities created by new technologies, have become disenchanted with being harangued by leftist reductionists, whose ideology is basically unrealistic, and lacks any focus, or priority, except a determination to be anti whatever currently exists. The US looney right is just as bad ! Commonsense has been replaced by ranting ! AOL-Huffington, has obviously done the numbers and decided that ABG isn't paying it's way. This is sad, because ABG was once a great, moderate, 'green' website.
          Marcopolo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @EZEE
          @ Ford Future, Public support for 'Green technology' is waning due to a lack of performance. Solar has proved disappointing and due the PRC dumping cheap, but poor quality panel into the market, sales have dramatically slowed once government incentives have been removed. Wind power remains largely uneconomic and reliant on government assistance. The only alternate power source to fossil fuels that ahs so far proved economic without government assistance has been is Geo- thermal. Curiously, most of the private Geo-thermal industry has been developed by Chevron Oil ! But none of these alternatives can supply even a fraction of the 'on demand' power generation required by a modern industrial society. This doesn't mean that research into alternatives shouldn't continue, or be the ultimate goal. But making wild claims about alternate energy, at the expense of developing North America's huge Natural gas reserves, is an irresponsible folly.
      diffrunt
      • 2 Years Ago
      Subsidized farming is primarily a corporate , not private, affair.
        Letstakeawalk
        • 2 Years Ago
        @diffrunt
        Family-owned farms take in a huge percentage of the subsidies distributed by the government. Ask your local family farmer who pays them when there is a crop failure - they'll tell you they couldn't survive without government subsidized insurance. "Government Program Participation All farm typology groups participate in government farm programs to some extent, but the relative importance of the programs varies. High-sales small farms, large family farms, and very large family farms are most likely to receive commodity program payments (fig. 3-10). These three groups receive nearly three-fourths of commodity program payments, reflecting their production of program commodities (fig. 3-11). Retirement, residential/lifestyle, and low-sales small farms, on the other hand, account for nearly two-thirds of CRP and WRP payments and the acres enrolled in the programs (fig. 3-12)." http://www.usda.gov/factbook/chapter3.htm#government http://www.usda.gov/factbook/art/fig310.jpg
      Tweaker
      • 2 Years Ago
      Just for perspective, what percentage of diesel use is 1 billion gallons?
        Jesse Gurr
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Tweaker
        There is a lot of data on the subject and it is kinda hard to get a firm number but lets try. 1 barrel of oil = 42 gallons of oil http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_psup_dc_nus_mbbl_a.htm According to the EIA we used 1.423 billion barrels of Distillate Fuel Oil(Diesel). That also includes diesel used for autos, trucks, trains, farm equipment, even power generation. Basically anything that is diesel is included. That makes out to 1.423B X 42 = 59.766 billion gallons of diesel With the goal of 1.3B gallons of bio diesel that makes to: 1.3B / 59.766B = 2.18% of total US consumption. We definitely need more.
          Jesse Gurr
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Jesse Gurr
          Oh my bad, that number is for the entire year of 2011.
        Dave D
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Tweaker
        It's hard to say. I can't find any breakout of specific diesel vs gasoline, but the eia says we used 134 billion gallons of "gasoline" last year. But if you read their site, they are very confusing as they seem to get this by assuming "42 gallons" per barrel and then subtracting off "inventory" from refineries, etc as it is used. They never break out whether that is gas or diesel or "other" petroleum products. So for easy calculations, let's just pretend it's all diesel and say that you could get about 3 days per year worth for the US from that 1 billion gallons of bio-diesel.
      Ford Future
      • 2 Years Ago
      Any details? What are they going to grow to produce bio-diesel? Will it burn in the latest diesel engines?
        EZEE
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ford Future
        I have heard some that used 'done' McDonalds French fry oil, and (no joke) the exhaust smells like fries.
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