Tires get overlooked in the headlines about fuel economy and CAFE standards, which is a little odd. After all, a car's tires are the only contact it has with the road, so more efficient rubber means more efficient use of fuel, and even tiny gains spread over the huge number of road-going vehicles can translate into remarkable overall gains.

Michelin has made a spot that demonstrates the difference its Energy Saver A/S tire can make by staging a downhill drag race. There's a twist, though, and it makes the point beautifully. You can check it out in the video below.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 48 Comments
      Soul Shinobi
      • 2 Years Ago
      This was in no way educational.
      Gorgenapper
      • 2 Years Ago
      Michelin didn't demonstrate how low rolling resistance tires worked with that ad. It demonstrated the stopping distance between its tires vs that of an unnamed competitor. I did not see anything to tell me what a low rolling resistance does and how it accomplishes its job.
      merlot066
      • 2 Years Ago
      There's something wrong with the youtube link, it brings up a commercial for defender tires first, it's on an autoplay playlist. The fuel-max commercial is like the third one on the list. Tire commercials are probably the most universally good commercials out there. Maybe it's because there aren't an obscene amount of them like cable TV and car insurance commercials but when a tire manufacturer puts a tv spot out it's usually pretty good, this one included.
      ayeco
      • 2 Years Ago
      There is absolutely no "how it works" in this. Weak sauce.
      DriftFreak
      • 2 Years Ago
      I don't get how that is related to how low rolling resistant tires work. More like an ad for stopping distance.
      Thipps
      • 2 Years Ago
      EFF you AOL...and WTF who is the editor on autoblog now?
      schizzle
      • 2 Years Ago
      The 3rd video in the series (2 videos after the one above) shows the low-rolling resistance tires. Still an ad by Michelin though.
      Sox05
      • 2 Years Ago
      Michelin still make the best tires.
      Stang70Fastback
      • 2 Years Ago
      Yeah, this is the video they meant to link, which I found rather amusing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oYGDkh0RG_w
        francinela
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Stang70Fastback
        Makes a lot more sense. Still thought it would be more in depth than a TV commercial. So much for coming to Autoblog everyday.
        Gorgenapper
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Stang70Fastback
        Okay that makes FAR more sense for the article.
      Ducman69
      • 2 Years Ago
      First off: 1) That car has ABS, so why did both wheels lock up? 2) They are only comparing to other "low rolling resistance" tires in their "we're better than anonymous competitors". What everyone knows though is that low rolling resistance tires SUCK! They start squealing like stuck pigs when you even hint at taking a corner fast, and generally just feel like the rubber on your tires has been replaced by plastic from a Bigwheels of your childhood. I am sure they help fuel economy, but to pretend they are good for traction is a joke. Good traction tires are still soft and squishy.
        Bruce Lee
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ducman69
        It's not really anonymous...they mention the competitor tire at the bottom in the fine print (it's a goodyear tire)
      leo
      • 2 Years Ago
      no thanks i don't want low performing tires on my car just to save 0.1gal of gas per month i can do that by selecting 1 day a month where i drive better to save that same gas and feel confident on my non low rolling resistance tires when I need them
        Sorten Borten
        • 2 Years Ago
        @leo
        Modern LRR tires won't match the dry pavement handling performance of the best summer tires, but they're certainly not unsafe. The Michelins will save you between 5% and 7% on fuel consumption per month, but they are expensive. A less expensive and almost as efficient option are Bridgestone Ecopia 422 tires. If you drive 15,000 miles per year and get 30 mpg in your current vehicle, a typical LRR tire will save you almost $400 (at the current $4/gal gas price) over the life of the tires.
      Dsuupr
      • 2 Years Ago
      I lost 3 to 5 mpg on my 2011 Chevy Cruze ECO when I switched out of the stock tires for new ones (car now has 50k miles) The low resistance tires would have saved me $600 over the life of the tires (assuming $4 a gallon gasoline) but cost $650 more to buy. the new tires are more compliant, better at handling and quieter. I am sad at the loss of gas mileage but feel the new tires are worth the loss.
        WillieD
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dsuupr
        So you're saying you got your new ones for free? A set of OEM tires for the Cruze Eco costs $560 at Tire Rack. You could have also gotten a set of LRR Firestone FR710s for $460.
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