With its promise of a fun driving experience mixed with super space saving and energy efficiency, we think the Lit Motors C-1 has the potential to be a disruptive bit of transportation tech. And it appears we're not the only ones.

Founder Daniel Kim revealed the newest prototype of the self-balancing enclosed motorcycle at the 2012 TechCruch Disrupt conference, where it was named one of seven finalist in the "Startup Battlefield." While there isn't a lot of info available about how this latest iteration has been improved over the first drivable one – it's obviously sporting a much more refined outer shell – we have heard some numbers that definitely got our attention. For instance, the digits on the price tag.

When the hundreds of reservation holders (so far) begin to receive their automo-cycles in (hopefully) 2014, they will only have to shell out about $19,900. While that doesn't necessarily strike us as exorbitant, there is also good news for those who might be interested but not at that price point. The company envisions that price falling to a very reasonable $12,000 once production really ramps up. For their money, customers will get a unique machine that should sprint spritely to 60 miles per hour in six seconds, boast a 100-mph top speed and offer up to 200 miles of range. The line forms here to place a $250 deposit.

You can check out the Lit Motors presentation below, along with a bit of bonus footage of TechCrunch's managing editor Peter Ha testing out the C-1's self-balancing ability.





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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 13 Comments
      goodoldgorr
      • 2 Years Ago
      Im interrested to buy but as a second car for fun cause i already have a gasoline car with unlimited range and fueling in 5 minutes everywhere needed and that new car need long recharge and have a very limited range. So even if the car is unique and drive well it isn't a first car as is it supposed to be a green car. Instead this car is a toy that cost 20 000$.
      GoodCheer
      • 2 Years Ago
      That's pretty wild. I'd like to know more about how the stability control works, when and how it switches on and off, and what happens to all that rotational momentum once it does switch off and you are at speed.
        GoodCheer
        • 2 Years Ago
        @GoodCheer
        Well after looking at their site, it's clear this thing is not designed for fatties. Which I think is fine; you don't need every vehicle designed for every person. In general I love it. Looking over the company personnel page though, they seem notably short on manufacturing expertise. I'll be interested to see how they manage.
      TIMMAH!
      • 2 Years Ago
      Learned from the Aptera. I'll wait til the production versions are actually being sold...
        • 2 Years Ago
        @TIMMAH!
        how else dd you think you would get one.. Brainiac!!
        • 2 Years Ago
        @TIMMAH!
        how else dd you think you would get one.. Brainiac!!
      paulwesterberg
      • 2 Years Ago
      They are taking reservations on their website: http://litmotors.com
      Jeff Zekas
      • 2 Years Ago
      How is this vehicle superior to the Myers Motors NMG or the Indian-made Reva?
        GoodCheer
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Jeff Zekas
        Well, smaller cross-sectional area could mean significantly reduced Wh / km, meaning smaller battery per range, and less charging time per distance driven. Also, you can't sell a 4-wheeler in North America unless it passes million$ worth of crash tests, while a motorcycle (which includes Meyers) can be sold with a much smaller mountain of regulatory paperwork.
      • 2 Years Ago
      Cool that they have a kinda driveable prototype, but as always with alt-vehicle startups they're burning a ton of money on pretty websites and animations and they don't have anything close to sellable. I'm especially curious about the animation that shows the vehicle running cones; I think it's just supposed to be a fun video, and it looks good to see the vehicle banking from cone to cone, but how would the gyroscopes do that? I'm pretty certain the answer is they wouldn't, those things are spinning incredibly fast, you can't change their speed fast enuf to match steering input, the vehicle should just stay level in all conditions. I wonder how that will feel? Hope they spend a little of their capital making something I could test drive...
        • 2 Years Ago
        found a good video here, lots of details: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zb51CvptTt4 so gyros are on a software controlled gimbal to allow tilting (and other features), so kinda like the system in the Dutch Carver? Very cool, and also a huge tech challenge, in other systems the biggest issue is getting the tilt to initiate a split second before the wheels turn, I'll be watching to see Lit's solution.
      Ashton
      • 2 Years Ago
      I have a truck, and like it. But the majority of days I don't need a bigger vehicle, and would love to have one of these little things. The fact that it's electric, and balances amazingly good are what interest me the most, the look of it is kinda...meh. It could use a slight makeover to make it look cooler.
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