News flash: trucks are popular in the U.S. and subcompacts aren't. While most of the customer loyalty stats we generally hear about are focused on brands, Inside Line recently did a study tracking how loyal customers are to a particular vehicle segment by tracking which vehicles customers trade in when purchasing a new car.

Not surprisingly, full-size trucks had the most loyal customers with almost two-thirds (61.8 percent) of truck buyers opting for another truck. Vans and minivans round out the top three spots, which makes sense, as vehicles in those segments are generally needed for a specific purpose. Luxury vehicles took up four of the top 10 categories.

On the opposite end, only 15.1 percent of subcompact car buyers return to the segment with midsize and large crossovers finishing off the bottom three of the list. Despite being two of the most popular vehicles on the road, midsize cars were in the middle of the pack and compact crossovers were ranked 18 out of the 22 categories.

One segment we would really like to have seen on this list was hybrids to see if it backed up reports from earlier this year that said hybrid buyers generally don't buy another.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 35 Comments
      disneyhero
      • 2 Years Ago
      Loved my truck, but living in the country and driving 60 miles a day to and from work with gas close to $4 a gallon - I switched to the Toyota Highlander with mid 20's per gallon.
      789dm
      • 2 Years Ago
      Loyalty? from the list it is just obvious. Trucks on top of the list because not many company sell them. Then the next on the list are the minivans. Of course if everybody up to date they know few car companies offer minivan or vans. And the bottom of the list are the category that almost ALL car companies sell. Compacts, Midsize. Few options = stay to brand that you know plus few competitors make them less innovative in that segment. While compacts and midsize are overcrowded all those car companies need to be creative to compete with the other guys. This is good for consumer because they have MORE options and that is why they move from one brand to another.
        tbensonny
        • 2 Years Ago
        @789dm
        This article was about types of vehicles not brands.......
      Max Wagner
      • 2 Years Ago
      Notice that small cars, as well as SUVs, have the least loyal customers. This is all due in part to the gas prices, and their fluctuations. When gas prices are low, people say "Uhhh, small cars are SOOO unsafe, only little girls buy them, who needs good mpg" etc and hop into a gas-guzzling SUV "My family is going to be safe in this." Then gas prices suddenly skyrocket. People say "Ugh, my SUV gets such terrible mileage, SUVs are for douchebags, SUV buyers are overcompensating for a small _____." Then they hop into a subcompact. "I love this thing and I'm never going to need to buy gas." I've been noticing this trend for a long time, and about 10 years back, I decided to take advantage of it. Since then, I've been buying used cars, at an average of $6000 each, and selling them when the gas prices are in their favor.I buy SUVs when gas prices are high, and I sell them for a profit when gas prices are low. I buy subcompacts when prices are low, and I sell them when gas prices are high.I almost never actually use the cars (my primary mode of transport is a Brammo Empulse which is an electric motorcycle, and I have a 2004 Lotus Elise and a 2012 Ducati 848 for track use) My garage right now consists of the aforementioned vehicles, plus a 2000 Chevrolet Subaruban, a 2001 Toyota Sequoia, a 2001 Toyota Echo, a 2003 Mini Cooper, and a 2004 Chevrolet Aveo. I don't mean to brag, but I have made some pretty good money doing this
        Titansfan1967
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Max Wagner
        Max I do not where you live but for 6000 dollars will not get you even a decent used car in Texas.
          SatinSheetMetal
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Titansfan1967
          It doesn't really matter what condition the vehicle is in if he is able to sell it for profit. Those that seek to take advantage of others don't typically have much in the way of a conscience, so I doubt he cares if they are buying crap. I doubt they know they are buying crap.
        Titansfan1967
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Max Wagner
        Max I do not where you live but for 6000 dollars will not get you even a decent used car in Texas.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Ivan Ivanovich Renko
      • 2 Years Ago
      Other than the hype, why would anyone buy a hybrid in the first place? If only Americans knew how to drive a vehicle with a clutch and if we could have access to some of the small diesels available every-bloody-where-else in the world, you could get way better fuel economy and much higher vehicle longevity. (Does anyone know how much it would cost to replace the battery pack in a ten year old Prius, for example?)
        Sir Duke
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ivan Ivanovich Renko
        Ivan......: In case you haven't noticed, Americans are not the healthiest lot in the world, no need to add even more products that would adversely affect their health. Also, two-thirds of the US population live in or near a metropolitan area. Diesels, while cleaner that they used to be, are still diesels. Diesels out in rural (open) areas, have minimal impact on the surrounding environment. Diesels in our heavily populated centers not so good.
          BB79826
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Sir Duke
          And not even considering diesel emissions, the fact (yes, fact) remains that in any traffic whatsoever, hybrids save so much fuel it's not even funny. But people love to focus on highway fuel economy for some reason as if that's the end-all and be-all of fuel consumption. Confusing.
          mapoftazifosho
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Sir Duke
          I know, we'll put clean in front of diesel...that will solve everything! While diesel emissions have improved drastically, they're still nothing to write home about. There are much better alternatives. Don't get me wrong, diesel powertrains are great for a lot of people, but I just don't see this being the savior in the US. Diesel-hybrids...now that does start to get me excited, but the costs are just too high at this moment in time.
          Cbus944T
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Sir Duke
          Sir Duke....I don't know where you're getting your information from, but it is wholly incorrect. With the current EGR and SCR systems that are being placed on newer engines in order to meet the stringent EPA standards, diesel engines are producing cleaner emissions than gasoline equivalents while also maintaining fairly high mpg standards. Often times the exhaust is actually cleaner than the air the system is taking in. Now does this mean people aren't modifying their vehicles to be otherwise? Certainly not. It's understandable why there is such a stigma with diesels, especially when you look back at their history. But this is not the case anymore.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Sir Duke
          [blocked]
      goatcars
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hybrid buyers usually don't buy another...What a surprise !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Other than liberal tree huggers and iconoclasts, they simply don't make economic sense. Full electrics are more economical, but "range anxiety" prevents any sane individual from buying one.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @goatcars
        [blocked]
      Polly Prissy Pants
      • 2 Years Ago
      What kind of boring person would buy the exact same type of vehicle time after time? Sure if you require a truck and are forced to drive one that makes sense, but there are way too many affordable, exciting cars out there to get stuck in that rut.
        tbensonny
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Polly Prissy Pants
        Thank you thank you thank you -I've owned front wheel drive, rear wheel drive , front engine, mid engine, rear engine, built a steel tube sand rail had SUVs, 4 wheel drive pickups, convertable, taiga top,automatics manuals, new cars used cars you name it: plus a couple of motorcycles - come one people get a life..... one brand or one type are you kidding me
        Chris
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Polly Prissy Pants
        That's just it. Most people aren't enthusiasts, so they tend to buy vehicles for more practical purposes. What I have also noticed about people with full size trucks and vans is that they tend to hang on to them for a long time, so it is understandable that when the time comes to get a new vehicle, those people are going to want to get what they have become used to, and/or still see a need for. I would say that at least 75% of the people I know who drive vehicles from these segments have done so for as long as I have known them.
      IBx27
      • 2 Years Ago
      Kind of makes sense; my dad bought a Fiesta for commuting through his last few remaining years of work before retirement. The Fiesta has been awesome so far, but once he's done he wants a Jeep, or a Mustang, something fun and less frugal.
      Charles2337
      • 2 Years Ago
      Once you own a truck, every other car feels like a step down. The ride height, the power, the ruggedness is just great.
      dohc73
      • 2 Years Ago
      It's the way it is in America. it's big country out there in the middle, a subcompact just isn't conducive to most people's needs driving out in plains and places like flat and expansive Texas. And companies are just going to develop engines that will suit these trucks and still get decent MPGs, like Ford has started to do. Small cars have always been the norm in Europe, they wouldn't expect anything else as the common car size. In America, bigger cars fit the landscape and small cars are more niche or trend or dirt cheap rides. I for one wish we got some of the great little hatchbacks from Euro brands like Renaut, or Peugeot or even VW that America will never see.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @dohc73
        [blocked]
      crabbo71
      • 2 Years Ago
      most americans are huge compared to the other continents,,so we like huge cars/trucks/suv's...mainly it is because we can get in and out of them...the only subcompact that i personally can get in and out of easily is the honda fit...getting 40 mpg is no good if you can't get in the car...like buying shoes that don't fit,,no mattwer how sharp they are you can't wear them..also a lot of americans are horse power junkies,,,hard to smoke the tires on a sub compact !!!!
        tbensonny
        • 2 Years Ago
        @crabbo71
        I resent being compared to a continent. Yes ,I know that americans often a so grossly overweight that you notice there peculiar oder of the morbidly obese when your standing behind them in line waiting to order another super sized fast food meal but to claim their bigger than a continent well thats going a little to far.
      aokil
      • 2 Years Ago
      I LOVE my Ford Explorer !! This is the second one I've owned and it's paid for. I may not get the best gas mileage, 20 mpg on the road BUT I don't have a huge car payment on a small car that would not suit my lifestyle and though gas is expensive, it's still less expensive than a car payment per month.
    • Load More Comments