For the third time in five years, the oldest known surviving Ford is for sale. The red, meticulously restored, 1903 Ford Model A is one of Ford Motor Company's first three cars ever produced and over the past 109 years, has had only five owners.

You could be the sixth owner at the RM auction in Hershey, Pennsylvania next month, but be warned: the last time this car changed hands in 2007, it sold for $693,000. For a car that originally sold new for $850, and without adjusting for inflation, that's a more than 81,000% appreciation.

The car's original owner was Herbert L. McNary, a butter maker from Britt, Iowa. Another Iowan, Harry E. Burd, acquired the Ford from the McNary family for $400 for it in the 1950s. Burd had the car restored and sold it to a Swiss Ford dealer in 1961. It remained there until 2001, when it was bought anonymously and shipped back to the States. John O'Quinn was the well-heeled buyer at the aforementioned 2007 auction. His estate offered it up again in 2010, but it was a no-sale when bidding topped out at $325,000.

So, what will bidders in Hershey be going after? Model A Chassis No. 30 is a 72-inch wheelbase four-seater, powered by a horizontally opposed, 100-cu.-in. two cylinder with a whopping 8 hp. That's eight horses, probably less than your lawnmower. But that probably doesn't matter since it's not likely the next buyer will do much cruising in this one-of-a-kind machine.


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  • 93 Comments
      SNICKLE MAN 49
      • 2 Years Ago
      THE FORD COMPANY SHOULD BUY IT SINCE IT`S ONE OF A KIND AND THE LAST ONE OF ITS KIND
        grainman1955
        • 2 Years Ago
        @SNICKLE MAN 49
        Snickle Man 49, I couldn't agree with you more; Ford should by it and put it on display.
      Denis
      • 2 Years Ago
      I see vintage Fords and Chevys. I never see vintage Hondas and Toyotas. Why is that?
        Doug
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Denis
        Two words: Who cares?
        wrxfrk16
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Denis
        For one, most Japanese makers didn't begin building cars until the post WWII era, so right off the bat the Big Three have half a decade of car making on them in terms of vintage automobiles. Second, most of the cars that came here originally were very utilitarian, practical machines, save a few oddballs. Reliable and dependable, but not all that desirable. Also, most of the performance oriented models and desirable vehicles, like the old Honda S600, Nissan Skylines, various rally prepped sedans and hatchbacks, etc never made it here, or not in any number. Thus, there's never been a big enthusiast base here, whereas in Japan and Europe many vintage Hondas and Toyotas are gaining collectibility. That said though, there are collector status Japanese cars here, at least in the making. All the late eighties, early nineties sports cars; the Supra, RX-7, 300ZX TT, Eclipse, Starion, NSX, all the Si Hondas, etc are becoming highly desirable, especially clean and unmodified examples.
      dennisiddm
      • 2 Years Ago
      Buying Cars for an Investment is not such a Great Idea All those Classic Car shows you see? Most have More In both Time and $ invested into Restoring them than they get selling them My BIL restores Cars, starts at $30k and Up I have some 60's and 70's Cars, All "Driver" type cars, but still I have more into them than they are worth.. Add another $500 Yr For Inside Storeage for Each car? Priceless Only way To Cut the costs and Pay for themselves? Rent them out for Parades and Car Shows..and to Politicans Running for Office... That's how I've done it..
        guacamolem
        • 2 Years Ago
        @dennisiddm
        & period movies, ie. Dazed & Confused or American Grafitti. Or ZZ Top videos
        MIKEY'S SCREEN
        • 2 Years Ago
        @dennisiddm
        Sometimes the restorer doesn't care about time and price it takes to restore. It's not always about making money off if the piece but the time and love of restoring it back to the original. Some people just like doing it, others do it for their grandkids to have one day. Different strokes for different folks.
      GMW
      • 2 Years Ago
      Yea, but how many miles?
      Wills
      • 2 Years Ago
      This really stands tall as a true piece of American history, heritage and innovation.
      wau8374716
      • 2 Years Ago
      Wow that would be a Great Car .
      rick52259
      • 2 Years Ago
      Can't wait to try it out on Texas's 85mph highway.
      Wwhatever747
      • 2 Years Ago
      It's Karma, young generations don't want to buy piece of History. Yet they cannot afford homes, car insurance for their first car?
      cgirod
      • 2 Years Ago
      I need to win the lottery today so I can have that.
      arenadood
      • 2 Years Ago
      Cool car, will it run on todays Gas/alcohol mix?
        magsmom1101
        • 2 Years Ago
        @arenadood
        my 92' tbird runs like garbage on it.. I highly doubt that one likes it either.
      steve_macdonald
      • 2 Years Ago
      "Only" 8 horsepower. Doesn't sound like much until you realize that the strongest humans (olympic heavy weight lifters) generate approximately 5 1/2 horsepower during the clean and jerk.
      Nobear
      • 2 Years Ago
      and I wish I still had my fifty year anniversary special. Crestliner convertable, stick shift with over drive, leather seats . real nice. Cost me 300 bucks in 1959, I was the second owner.
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