According to the Associated Press, a Hong Kong-based concern is close to building new Saab models. After some delays, National Electric Vehicle Sweden (NEVS) has completed the purchase of bankrupt Swedish automaker Saab.

NEVS says it plans to debut an electric vehicle in about 18 months. When the car comes to market, it will wear the Saab name, but not the marque's well-known griffin logo. Reuters reports that the company will produce EVs based on the Saab 9-3 platform, with intentions to sell these vehicles primarily in the Chinese market. Due to the continued use of the distinctive griffin head logo by commercial truckmaker Scania and the Saab aerospace group, NEVS was only granted access to the Saab name, not its emblem.

At the moment, it is unclear if the 9-3 architecture to which NEVS is referring is that of the now-defunct model or the new Phoenix architecture whose rights were recently purchased by Chinese automaker Youngman from previous Saab owner Spyker.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 12 Comments
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 2 Years Ago
      It would have cost another billion dollars for the squawking bird icon.
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 2 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        ( because you know, this brand is so valuable now. )
        Rick
        • 2 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        GM the sugar daddy went broke, a billion LOL GM would have wasted more than that for a new badge for Saab. Won't stop the Chinese they will still do it for nothing just have the Griffins head facing the other way around l am sure Apple might sue them though for something like using the same electrons in their devises or something else though.
      Rick
      • 2 Years Ago
      Saab buyers deserted the brand on mass when it became nothing more than a tarted up GM Vauxhall Vectra in Europe. It used to be such an innovative company, Even the Vauxhall used the Griffin on the grille it was hard to see any difference in the two Vectra's, so the Saab brand was destined to fail under hapless GM. Whats green about a Griffin badge or a rebadged Vauxhall Vectra?
        Marco Polo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Rick
        @ Rick, Griffon (or Gryphon) are ancient heraldic symbols, that may have originated with fossils. The Griffin on the Vauxhall's badge is transposed from the coat of arms of Sir John of Fulks, first owner of the manor where Vauxhall originally began manufacture. (Fulk's Hall =Vauxhall). ( it's a female griffin). It's the same symbol as that of Trinity College, Oxford, and hundreds of other institutions, including the flag of the elite 'e Utti Jaeger Regiment' of the Finnish armed forces. Saab, never made money due to it's heavy production costs and very high labour content. Saab's refusal to take advantage of GM's mass produced components, for even minor parts, meant Saab was never going to fit in with the GM dynamic. In the end, Saab became an oddball manufacturer, producing vehicles at a loss, for a dwindling number of eccentric enthusiasts. I hope Saab does better in the PRC as an EV producer.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Marco Polo
          @Marco as i've read the situation, i'd say: GM never wanted SAAB to, officially, be a money maker; by making them buy overpriced "mass produced" (and likely inferior) parts from other GM companies, the losses could be put in Sweden and the win in the US, or wherever the tax was advantageous, to maximize total win - GM's number one goal (atleast until the bailout), the word "longevity" seems to have been lacking in their vocabulary
          Matte
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Marco Polo
          @MP ehm, i don't hate GM, but have a look at Opel aswell, in a few years, i fear they will go the same way as SAAB, only allowed to operate on a part of the world market, although built in germany (which as probably the Best Auto industry in the world) they can not fully take advantage of it but has to sit in between the german and US-american seats - in hard times it is just damn difficult to please or take advantage of both at the same time I agree with you on the owner part - i think they hadn't had a "plus" year in like 20 years or so, great but special and expensive cars with not too seldom quality misses (maybe two mondays a week? =) ) btw: SAAB Automobile had buyers, but GM refused to sell and if what you're saying is true, why did they not sell of the "piece of crap" earlier? when it was actually worth something? or atleast boot the hardnecked leaders and bring in some people who would do as they were told? oh, and "oddball" - saab was never anything else, though GM sure did try to make it a faceless walmart-item (again, i dont hate them for it, its even logical, its just very difficult to make an apple out of a pear)
          Matte
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Marco Polo
          @ MP .. and btw "but also made SAAB employees the world's highest paid, least productive auto-workers in the world !" just no, high , maybe even unreasonably high, paid, maybe, definitly not "highest" "least productive", uhm, if you count work hours/car, probably lower than any other GM high-volume cars, but if you mean lazy - definitly not, i know a few former SAAB-workers, they loved their jobs and worked their asses off to get it running, but when the leaders dont know how to lead (if it was even possible) it doesnt matter how hard your workers are working
          Marco Polo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Marco Polo
          @ M.T. What a weird interpretation ! Your hatred of GM has provided you with a very distorted history of SAAB For most of it's existence, GM has successfully, and profitably, operated overseas subsidiaries. (Holden, Vauxhall, Opel, Daewoo-Alpheon etc.) SAAB had problems with a number of partners/owners/ investors before GM. GM tried very hard to make SAAB profitable, but the existing Swedish management at SAAB resisted every effort to reform SAAB. The cars became ridiculously expensive to manufacture. The Labour costs and practices at the Trollhattan factory, were held up by SAAB as idealistic examples of labour relations and union harmony, but also made SAAB employees the world's highest paid, least productive auto-workers in the world ! SAAB had problems long before GM. SAAB was unable to develop it's own advanced platforms and the even the Wallenburg family couldn't continue to subsidize SAAB's losses, funded by the profitability of Scania-Vabis. The only model which came close to making a profit was the convertible 900, which was produced in Finland by Valmet. ( Later in Graz, Austria) . Fiat attempted to bring some cost saving concepts to SAAB, but failed as did Peugeot. An example is of SAAB's intransigence was the issue of hood catches and hinging. GM manufactures millions of this standardized product per year very, very cheaply. For no technical reason, SAAB spent $ 65 million developing it's own design, despite the obvious suitability of the GM product. SAAB is a car maker who never sold enough cars to justify it's existence. It built up a loyal group of buyers who appreciated the cars unique approach and oddball appeal. But in the end, car manufacture is a business and car manufacture must produce a profit. The only time in recent history SAAB made a profit, was in 2005. This was due to GM's insistence that the new '900' shared a platform with the Opel Vectra. That's why no other car maker wanted to buy SAAB. (apart from PRC manufacturers). Once GM announced that GM technology was not part of the deal, potential buyers (including the Swedish government) became totally disinterested. (So much for Rick's idea that of inferior GM technology !). GM is not the bad guy in SAAB's demise ! SAAB refused to accept reality ! The Auto-industry is too capital intensive to maintain small manufacturers, with very high overheads, without access to the synergies of an established OEM to defray development and distribution costs.
          Rick
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Marco Polo
          Thanks for the little history lesson Marco Polo, l always like to become better informed. Saab a very innovative quirky company were never gonna do well under GM a pile them high sell them cheap, once they become a rebadged Vauxhall Vectra with all Vauxhall running gear its loyal buyers deserted them on mass.
      Giza Plateau
      • 2 Years Ago
      I've got a bad feeling about this
      Spec
      • 2 Years Ago
      Considering how the existing electrics are doing, it is kinda surprising to see new people eager to enter the EV market. But hey . . . the more, the merrier.