"My dog ate my homework." That excuse might not have worked in grade school, and as Volkswagen proves in its latest ad for the Jetta sedan, telling your boss "my dog ate my keys" is no excuse for being late to work, either.

In this clever new 30-second commercial, a frantic Jetta owner struggles to find his keys before realizing that man's best friend has, in fact, digested them. No problem, though – with keyless entry, the fob only needs to be within a certain proximity of the vehicle to do everything from locking and unlocking the doors to rolling up the windows and closing the sunroof. It's a clever ad (bonus points for the Johnny Cash "Dirty Old Egg-Suckin' Dog" soundtrack), and all we can say is, let's hope that fob can withstand a good washing after it, um, presents itself again.

Scroll down to see the VW spot in its entirety.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 31 Comments
      Abdul
      • 2 Years Ago
      I like recent VW ads! funny!
      joe shmoe
      • 2 Years Ago
      clever. I don't like VW cars, but their commercials are good.
      Carbon Fibre
      • 2 Years Ago
      Please stop saying "the power of German engineering". It used to be said for spontaneous mention of a true car, now with repetitive usage, it will be overrated to the point where it's going to be a damn joke if anything happens or goes wrong in the future of German auto makers, just STOP and shut up.
      Anderson Sirolli
      • 2 Years Ago
      Great advertisement!! Perfect way to explain how the keyless system works :)
      breakfastburrito
      • 2 Years Ago
      All the fancy electronics in VW's, are exactly what fails. Their 2.0 turbo motor is a brilliant piece of engineering - but I don't own a VW, due to many friends with electrical issues on their VW cars.
        Charles2337
        • 2 Years Ago
        @breakfastburrito
        Let me guess, computers are evil and one day robots will take over the world right?
          SatinSheetMetal
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Charles2337
          Yes, and everyone is going to laugh right until they realize. Haha, autonomous cars are great. Oh, ****, I don't have the ability to dictate where I can and can't go anymore.
        Clark
        • 2 Years Ago
        @breakfastburrito
        Blah blah blah, look at a calendar- It's not 2000 anymore. Same ole comments here and I think the brand has moved on without you.
          breakfastburrito
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Clark
          Sorry Clark, my bro has a new GTi, and it's been at the dealer multiple times for electronics issues. Check engine light comes on so often, he just ignores it now. Same old problems, brand new cars. Good luck at your dealership, Clark.
          bhtooefr
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Clark
          @breakfastburrito: The problem isn't the GTI's electronics. It's the dealer. They're legendary for being completely incompetent to do an oil change, much less actually diagnose and fix a problem (without just throwing thousands of dollars of parts at the problem). The warranty on a VW is also completely worthless because of that - they won't pay for an independent shop to do the repairs instead, so...
        ragtopoval
        • 2 Years Ago
        @breakfastburrito
        I'm on my 3rd NEW VW (5th in all including the classics) and no problems for me. Sure, there are problems with some cars just as there are with all makes. But my '10 SportWagen is solid as was my '04 Passat and My '01 Golf as well. The problem is that only the few with issues speak up.
      desinerd1
      • 2 Years Ago
      " VW Jetta ad suggests keyless entry is not always convenient " and once again, logic evades Autoblog. If the keys weren't keyless, wouldn't the owner have to take the dog to the vet in a cab, or call a locksmith? So, which option is more convenient?
        Gorgenapper
        • 2 Years Ago
        @desinerd1
        Saving a story from the jaws of reason
        sc0rch3d
        • 2 Years Ago
        @desinerd1
        logic evades you sir....the phrase "keyless entry" is commonly known as having a remote where you're required to push a button. This is why we have new phrases like "key fob" and "smart key" to differentiate. While the phrase itself makes no sense....neither does more than half the english language nor human intelligence.
      Hotsuye
      • 2 Years Ago
      Wouldn't it actually Be convenient? Cause if they were normal keys he wouldn't of been able to start the car. lol
      over9000
      • 2 Years Ago
      if he had a regular key or keyless with the push of the button, then he wouldn't be able to get into his car. what a dumb headline.
      Edward
      • 2 Years Ago
      If he's the owner, and he's at home, where are his duplicate keys, as issued with the car? Cheeses Cry money!
        amac
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Edward
        Uh... maybe he doesn't know where his spare keys are. I honestly can't remember where I put mine. Mental note: find spare keys. Thanks VW!
      ducksuckduck
      • 2 Years Ago
      I like any and all car commercials with dogs in them! Now go make a commercial where the Darth Vader kid swallows the key!
      Hajime1990 #follow
      • 2 Years Ago
      lol
      trzjax
      • 2 Years Ago
      LOL
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