Following a tumultuous four months, it appears Hyundai and its labor union have buried the hatchet. According to a report by the Associated Press, the Korean automaker and its labor union have struck an accord that will end the company's first strike in four years.

The deal between the two parties, which will be put to a vote of 40,000 unionized workers on September 3, would eliminate night shifts and increase workers' wages.

The strike, which started in July, has resulted in the loss of $1.4 billion in potential output. To compensate for the lost time and the new work hours, Hyundai will invest $264 million in upgrading facilities to maximize output.

The deal is not set in stone yet, as Hyundai workers rejected an earlier deal between union leaders and company management. According to Kwon Oh-il, a labor union official, "In previous years, there were cases when the tentative deal had failed to win majority votes."

Hyundai hopes that this deal will win the vote and workers can get back on task. A partial strike on Wednesday resulted in the loss of 15,000 vehicles in potential output. In spite of this, Hyundai appears able to meet its sales targets this year due to high production volume in the first six months of 2012.


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  • 25 Comments
      Ducman69
      • 2 Years Ago
      I wonder if this is a matter of organized crime gaining strength in Korea and hitting the unions like the UAW here in the United States, or what is happening over there. Hard to tell in the picture if they are over-entitled, lazy, overpaid, uneducated slobs like our local UAW though, so perhaps their union actually has merit and reasonable requests, or if they will be the parasitic leach that will destroy their domestic auto industries like we've seen in the United States. *shrugs*
      Car Guy
      • 2 Years Ago
      It's easy to distinguish this union from the UAW. Note the absence of people sleeping, drinking 40's, and puffing pot.........
        Toddley
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Car Guy
        Yes. All UAW workers are lazy. All of them. /s
      Dr. Claw
      • 2 Years Ago
      LMMFAO. I'm sorry, but disliking a car because it's manufactured by union labor is the most ASININE thing I've read in a minute. Even the old xenophobes of years gone by seem sane in comparison. Ayn Rand really does have her hand up the tailpipe of America.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dr. Claw
        [blocked]
          Adrian
          • 2 Years Ago
          What the heck do you even mean by "real" car? Buy what car fits your needs, not just because it's union or non-union. There are plenty of cars the union automakers make that are great, while I can think of many non-union cars that are junk, and vice versa. Basically, be quiet, troll, and go post your political crap on Drudge Report.
          caddy-v
          • 2 Years Ago
          Oh good Lord, SeaUrchin's back.
          Dr. Claw
          • 2 Years Ago
          I'm pretty sure that if you're on welfare, a Chevy Volt MIGHT be out of your price range...
      Bruce Lee
      • 2 Years Ago
      Pretty soon Hyundai's are gonna cost more than other cars with all these strikes
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Carma Racing
      • 2 Years Ago
      The photo shows exactly what unions do best - Sit and make demands. Then the cost of the product goes up and the company loses any market advantage it had. But I have to admit, the union bosses get very rich.
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