All is not lost for the future of the Nissan GT-R, according to Inside line. As you may recall, the site recently reported that CEO Carlos Ghosn had yet to green-light the next-generation supercar despite the fact that the model is quickly approaching its sixth anniversary. Now, IL indicates a new version of the GT-R will show up in 2018. Before that, a significant refresh will bow in 2013 as a 2014 model. With substantially revised front and rear fascias and driveline changes, the model should serve as a suitable stop-gap between now and when the next-generation GT-R touches ground.

Originally, Nissan wanted to debut the new model in 2015, but postponed development when chief engineer Kazutoshi Mizuno left the company due to health concerns. Mizuno has now returned, and work has gotten underway once again. What will the new machine bring to the table? Nissan isn't saying a word beyond the fact that the company is keeping a keen eye on the upcoming Acura NSX. That may mean the 2018 GT-R will show up wielding a battery pack. Stay tuned.


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  • 54 Comments
      joejoe509
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'd like to see some "lower" models for the GTR that are just RWD not AWD just like the R34. No, not directly based off of the GSeries/Skyline but RWD nonetheless. One of the biggest "complaints" about the GTR is that it takes all the risk out of driving. A RWD model should introduce some slip and slide for those who want some more adventurous driving.
      Shahul X
      • 2 Years Ago
      Double edge sword here... Battery packs? Meaning from 4000 to 4500lbs... I was hoping 3500 lbs and a manual, but we all know that'll never happen lol
      WindsWilling
      • 2 Years Ago
      So much speculation with "icons" these days... GT-R, powered by electric?! Evo XI, powered by diesel rear, electric front?! Supra, powered by gas rear, electric front?! GT3, no more manual option?! My heart can't take much more...
      Thatzmoney
      • 2 Years Ago
      Et tu Nissan? The GT-R is a bada$$ supercar that is priced within reach of a much larger market than the Ferraris, Lambos and McLarens. Please kee p it that way! If it ain't broke, don't try to fix it! Those are all the cliches I can fit into this comment.
        ratpack
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Thatzmoney
        just kill the GT-R... and bring back proper Nissan Skyline GT-R.
          Sukairain
          • 2 Years Ago
          @ratpack
          ... what's not proper about the GT-R? You can always throw the a Skyline badge on there.
      Avinash Machado
      • 2 Years Ago
      No Infiniti version?
      Nick
      • 2 Years Ago
      Can you remind me in 6 years when it matters.
      carguy1701
      • 2 Years Ago
      Nissan needn't worry about the NSX. It is going to be soft MR GT with a hybrid-style AWD system that doesn't belong in it.
      Andre Neves
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hey AB, I heard it's going to be a SHOOTING BRAKE!!! *snicker*
      Ron
      • 2 Years Ago
      If they try to put a GTR badge on anything with a battery pack and an electric motor, I sincerely hope they all catch fire and burn to the ground the second the badge touches the sheet metal.
        Big Rocket
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ron
        @Ron: Actually, the current GTR already has a battery pack to start the engine, plus several motors for the power windows, mirrors, etc. As the Internet says, "LOL."
          Ron
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Big Rocket
          Hybrids are just plain stupid..... The additional cost of the hybrid running gear far outweighs any gas savings. You would still have to own and drive the car for well over 100k miles before you even break even. ( for example the Tesla S is currently @85k, before you start checking the option boxes.... vs... say an M3? Or a Genesis Sedan R-Spec? Both are faster.. and about 40k cheaper... ) So if you take that 30k+ price difference... and say you get 100mpg with the Tesla, drive it 100000 miles @ $5 a gallon, that is $5000 in gas. Take another performance sedan @20 mpg, 100k mi, @5 a gallon is $25k in gas. You still 10k short of even breaking even.. and that is assuming you don't have to pay for any repairs or parts on that Hybrid system.. no 5k battery packs, or 10k motors etc., and it also assumes you paid cash for the car, and did not pay the additional interest on a loan. In terms of a high performance sports car... Any additional torque you can pull out of the motor is nullified by the additional weight of the batteries, motors, electronics etc. True ... that there are a few VERY expensive cars, such as the Tesla S, which will go 0-60 in a very-impressive 4.4s, and will get 100.7 per gallon, but they come it at a whooping 4650lb curb weight., even the Lotus based Roadster comes it at 2700lbs and it's performance is just terrible.... Bottom line... There is not yet any electric or Hybrid sports car that out perform an all gas sports car in the same price range, or where the gas savings can justify the increased cost withing the first 5 years of ownership.
          suthrn2nr
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Big Rocket
          but the media has taught him that battery powered cars are not manly, therefore he must hate all hybrids no matter how well they perform.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Big Rocket
          [blocked]
          Big Rocket
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Big Rocket
          @Ron: Your attitude towards hybrids has been tainted by mainstream cars such as the Prius, and they are hardly performance sports cars to begin with. When even Formula 1 race cars and (near future) Ferraris are using hybrid technology, it is a very safe bet hybrid technology can offer significant performance advantages, in spite of the weight penalty you spoke of. Also, the weight penalty you spoke of mostly applies to mainstream cars like the Prius, or pure electrics like the Tesla. Formula 1 and Ferrari's KERS hybrid technology is significantly more lightweight, which negates your argument. If I may oversimplify the issue: If a lightweight bottle of nitrous is good, then a lightweight bottle of self-regenerating nitrous (read: KERS) is even better.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Jonathan Ippolito
      • 2 Years Ago
      Wow a competitor for the NSX ! But the NSX is allwheel drive and the GT-R is rearwheel drive . I sure hope they do something about the GT-R's looks because it is just flat out ugly compaired to the NSX . As for the GT-R being a hybrid this could work in their favor if the motors are in the front wheels by improving handling and giving it some extra grip and preformance .
        captnclintock
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Jonathan Ippolito
        No, the GTR is all-wheel drive. The newer (2012) models have a RWD mode that you can enable.
        captnclintock
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Jonathan Ippolito
        I hate Autoblog's slow-ass commenting system. In case my previous post doesn't show up (since I don't see it).... The GTR has been always been all-wheel drive. The 2012 model includes a RWD mode; AWD is the primary layout.
          carguy1701
          • 2 Years Ago
          @captnclintock
          I seem to recall reading something about that, but is it only on the JDM models?
        carguy1701
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Jonathan Ippolito
        Get lost.
          captnclintock
          • 2 Years Ago
          @carguy1701
          Who are you telling to get lost? He likely made an honest mistake. As far as your question in relation to JDM models having the RWD feature only: not sure.
      protovici
      • 2 Years Ago
      Raced a newer GT-R and took my by a car length, but I took him by a mile with the looks of my car ;)
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