During next month's General Police Equipment Exhibition & Conference (GPEC) in Leipzig, Germany, BMW will present its next round of vehicles developed for police and VIPs. Five 2013 cars and four motorcycles – the 3 Series Touring, X3, 7 Series High Security and X5 Security, i3 Concept, R1200RT, G650GS, F800ST and K1600GT – will be displayed at the BMW stand.

Potential German federal and state police use of the 3 Series Touring and X3 were considerations during development, with features such as iDrive-controlled sirens and LED beacons integrated to BMW factory standards. At the opposite end, the electric i3 Concept is for police in urban areas where emissions reduction is a key consideration.

The BMW 7 Series High Security and X5 Security meet the elevated standards of amoured vehicles classified by the VR scale. The BR1 to BR7 measurements assess the resistance of the armour itself, but not how well the entire vehicular package withstands attack. The VR tests address that; the scale goes from VR1 to VR9, the 7 Series H.S. is rated at VR7 overall and VR9 in some specific cases. the X5 Security is rated VR4, which is tough enough to stop rounds from a .44 Magnum.

Motorcycle officers get the latest version of the much-used R1200RT, a brand new bronze-green military version of the G650GS, a prototype of the F800ST and a police-issue, six-cylinder K1600GT.


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  • 22 Comments
      cocuzzo79
      • 2 Years Ago
      I always thought the Crown Vic was preferred for its frame and simplicity, not its v8. The new Fusion would probably outrun a Crown Vic.
      • 2 Years Ago
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      • 2 Years Ago
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      Spellchecker
      • 2 Years Ago
      In Germany you can see a multitude of police cars from all German manufacturers. I live in Munich (Bavaria) so the cops tend to use BMW 320d Tourings and BMW 520d Tourings (new F10). Over in the next state whose capital is Stuttgart, they use Mercedes diesel police cars (C-Class/E-Class mainly). These are used to patrol the city and contrary to what most of you might think, are perfectly suited to high-speed Autobahn driving and catching most cars. They're quick and fuel-efficient (low running costs). There are specialized Autobahn police cars from Porsche, BMW and Mercedes that are there to catch or follow performance cars.
      • 2 Years Ago
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      Ak74
      • 2 Years Ago
      "armored vehicles" not "amoured" lol autoblog
        Mr.Roadrage
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ak74
        The world outside America spells it "armour", so both versions are correct.
          Ak74
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Mr.Roadrage
          Correct except there is no R in that world. Look at the beginning of the third paragraph.
          Mr.Roadrage
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Mr.Roadrage
          Ah! Well spotted AK74!
        Robin
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ak74
        Are you sure it's incorrect? I assumed "amoured" vehicles are specifically designed for German "Love Police" units, which patrol German raves. If you don't know about these police units, they are featured in the popular German TV police drama, "Leipzig Vice", which is often confused with a well-known US TV series -- not because of the name, but because German men still dress like Don Johnson in 1984.
      Lastchance
      • 2 Years Ago
      Welcome to America where the bigger is better mentality is the norm. The issue in the USA is Police departments only buy domestic brands which in the past limited the choices to gas guzzling POS. While domestic brands now have more fuel efficient options, Police departments still believe they need the bigger vehicles. Which might be the case in some situations but do they need a SUV for patrolling a city. I would like to see police departments adopt hybrids, and less powerful vehicles for certain situations where they don't need a big vehicle. And departments should start broadening their options by considering foreign vehicles that have better gas mileage and long term reliability.
        jtav2002
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Lastchance
        The Sheriff department here has actually added some Fusion Hybrids to their fleet. I can imagine the outcry here if cops were driving around BMW's though regardless of what engines are in. Can't imagine they're as cheap as the cars they currently use. I know our department pays right around $26k for the new Hemi Chargers.
      Ducman69
      • 2 Years Ago
      What is this, Munchen Vice? Why do they need beemers to write people traffic tickets? Must have a nice union.
        sanmusa
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ducman69
        My town's Polizei drives around in a Volkswagen Touran. Not all Polizei drive BMWs.
      Dean
      • 2 Years Ago
      I find it interesting that police forces across Europe find cars like the BMW 3-Series, Mercedes-Benz C-Class, Audi A4, various Volvos, and a multitude of other cars, in some cases, vehicles with 4 cylinders, acceptable for police work, while here in the US, there seems to be an outcry about the discontinuation of the Crown Victoria. We see it unacceptable to switch to the new Police Interceptor, and Interceptor Utility, which in base form, seem to be more powerful than the European offerings. I'm not trying to make fun of our police, or the mentality of 'bigger-is-better', but just trying to grasp why such a huge difference in mentality when it comes to vehicle size. Last I check, while there are a number of civilian vehicle offerings that would trump Ford's new offerings in the police car market, you can't really outrun the Motorola unit in each vehicle. As far as I can tell, if the police were all using Ford Fusions, it seems to me that despite being able to outrun them, the police would still come down on you in about the same manner, once they've got you surrounded (and from what I can tell, that's usually only a matter of time). I'd actually like to see what everyone things, and not get any of the 'small-police-cars-are-turds', or 'bigger engines are the only way to go' type answers. I thank those of you who answer this seriously, to everyone who's going to troll on this post - Grow the hell up, and get a life.
        rocketmoose
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dean
        I can't answer, but I can explain how we do things in the UK - specifically London. We have a huge variety of cars in use because we do not see just one car as the solution. In the city, many officers just need to get from A to B in no particular order, so they'd use a diesel Vauxhall Astra. Time-critical vehicle pursuits? 335d, Evo. Covert operations? A variety of unmarked Passats, Golf GTIs and so on. For public disorder? Armoured Transit and Sprinter vans. There's Volvo estates and Land Rovers, Shoguns and Land Cruisers in use too for motorway operations. We even use horses in the city. It's all about variety. Especially for London's Metropolitan Police. Recognising that a lot of the time an officer is only going small distances to respond to incidents that have already happened, there's simply no need for a turbo 6 or big V8. That's expensive and fuel inefficient. Not to mention that you can't even put down that amount of power (safely, anyway) on our smaller roads, in town or city.
        Snailguy
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dean
        In the US, the squad cars need to carry cops, their equipment, and still be able to fit a pair of 200 lbs perps in the back seat, hence the need for full size vehicles. For example, the California Highway Patrol requires that their cars be able to fit 4 fully equipped officers/carry prisoners and still be able to perform highway, rural, and urban pursuits. With the exception of the BMW X5, I don't think any of the small sedans/estates favoured by the Europeans would fulfill this requirement.
          calikev05
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Snailguy
          Yep, that's why the CHP chose the Explorer PPV over the Taurus. The requirement is silly considering a lot of the time you will see a lone officer patrolling.
        sanmusa
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dean
        There is a difference in budgeting too. MAeircan cars naturally burn more gas, as they are usually heavier and have bigger negines. That was specialy true of older egneration cars such as the Crown Vics and Chevy Caprice Classic that did police duty. Gas in Europe is 30-60% more expensive than in the US; hence European police forces usually buy smaller or more efficient vehicles to do the same duty as in the US. There is that old adage that you can't outrun the radio, so in case a perp's car outruns the Polizei's diesel Bimmer, the perp can be apprehended by helicopter or my other police cars up the road. Nowadays with the price of gas going up in the US (and Europe too of course), there is a budget crunch in the US to use more fuel efficient vehicles, and that is slowly driving police departments in the US to think about fuel economy for their fleet purchases too. Hence the new police cars in the US that are powered by V6s when a few years back they would be V8s. I think as long as the mission capability of the police force is not dimished by a more fuel efficient vehicle there is no harm in going with a less powerful platform.
        Benjamin Roethig
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dean
        Europe is a much different environment. They have very specialized vehicles and much more cramped surroundings. In instance, in the UK they would have different units for beat patrol, area patrol, response, and traffic. A single patrol car in the U.S. does all four and must carry more equipment in the trunk because of that. We also have on average far fewer police officers and a lower capitol expenditure per capita than european departments. There have been a few experiments, like Volvo offering the T5 police package in North America for a few years in the late 90s/early 00s, but they have generally been unable to stand up to the style of police work used in the U.S. and Canada. They spent a lot of time in the shop. When you get a bit closer to our style, which are the area and highway units, they're not using little I4 cars anymore, they're using BMW 5-series and Mercedes E-class.
          Snailguy
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Benjamin Roethig
          @Narom The M5 Estate would be too expensive (Crown Vics were going for about 22k new, Interceptors run under 30k new) and would still have less rear legroom, and probably less cargo space (after partitioning the rear bench seats from the rest of the car) than a Ford Interceptor sedan.
      • 2 Years Ago
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