Tesla Model S
  • Tesla Model S
  • Tesla Model S

  • tesla model s
  • tesla model s

  • Tesla Model S
  • Tesla Model S

  • Tesla Model S
  • Tesla Model S

  • Tesla Model S
  • Tesla Model S

  • Tesla Model S
  • Tesla Model S

  • Tesla Model S
  • Tesla Model S

  • Tesla Model S
  • Tesla Model S

  • Tesla Model S
  • Tesla Model S

  • Image Credit: Tesla Motors
  • Image Credit: Tesla Motors
  • Image Credit: Tesla Motors
  • Image Credit: Tesla Motors
  • Image Credit: Tesla Motors
In the latest official Tesla blog post, George Blankenship, Tesla's vice president of worldwide sales and ownership experience has got some fresh Model S numbers for us. Specifically, the company has now made 100 production Model S vehicles, with 74 of those destined for reservation holders. The rest, Blankenship writes, are "being used for test drive cars, in-store displays, engineering tests and for service team training. We plan to continue to increase production in the upcoming weeks."

That increased production target for the rest of the year is 5,000, with 20-30,000 in 2013.
To put all these numbers in perspective, in early August, Tesla had only made 50 Model S vehicles, 29 for customers.

Blankenship was one of the people who is now driving a new Model S. He writes, "And for those of you who are wondering, yes, my wife and I got our Model S on Saturday! It was delivered to our house at 10 a.m. sharp by one of our Tesla Delivery Experience Specialists. Some things really are priceless."


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  • 43 Comments
      Smith Jim
      • 2 Years Ago
      I used to be skeptical about Tesla because of the high cost of the Roadster and Model S. These cars are out of my price range and out of the price range of 90% of the population. Recently, I've come to the conclusion that Tesla could very well have an enormous effect on the public perception of green vehicles. I get annoyed when I hear people say that hybrids and EVs are not cool. If Tesla is successful with the Model S, and I'm confident they will be, EVs might become a status symbol. That could make all the difference in the world for the environmental movement.
        Nick
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Smith Jim
        Agreed, the Model S is iconoclastic and shatters a number of the anti-green's talking points: It's not a small econobox It looks stunning It blows the door off a number of comparable ICE powered cars
      Rotation
      • 2 Years Ago
      This doesn't seem like they've ramped up at all to me yet. They produced 50 cars in 3 weeks before, they produced about 50 in 3 weeks this time. But maybe it is as PR says, this is a marker so next time they announce figures you can see how much they really did ramp up.
        JakeY
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Rotation
        Actually, they have scaled about 4x already. From their blog, they started deliveries in June 22, had 10 in June 26 and had 50 in Aug 2. So they made 40 in 37 days previously. So average is 1.08 cars per day. http://www.teslamotors.com/enthusiasts/blogs/tag/model-s Now according to PR, they made 50 units in 12 working days, so 4.16 per day, now.
          kidcharlemgne
          • 2 Years Ago
          @JakeY
          I love math. I also love when idle speculation meets math. Keep up the good work Jake!
          Rotation
          • 2 Years Ago
          @JakeY
          Okay. I guess I slipped a month there.
          JakeY
          • 2 Years Ago
          @JakeY
          @Stoaty Marmot You are right, I just subtracted the two dates and didn't bother to figure in working days. Using full days (not just working days) works out to 50 units in 19 days or 2.63 cars per day. So roughly 3x instead. Still it's a big jump (and it's apparently going to ramp once again this week).
          Stoaty Marmot
          • 2 Years Ago
          @JakeY
          If you are going to compare, you really ought to use the same methodology for each time period. I figure they made 40 units in 28 working days (assuming 5 days per week), or 1.42 cars per day. This makes the rate triple, not quadruple.
          PR
          • 2 Years Ago
          @JakeY
          Jake is dead on. He beat me to the math.
      paulwesterberg
      • 2 Years Ago
      There was an article a few days ago about how tesla uses multi-function robots to automate its manufacturing process which will help them to ramp up unit production: https://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/19/business/new-wave-of-adept-robots-is-changing-global-industry.html
        PeterScott
        • 2 Years Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        "Most of them are imposing, 8 to 10 feet tall, giving them a slightly menacing “Terminator” quality. " I, for one, welcome our new robotic overlords.
      Kellan O'Connor
      • 2 Years Ago
      74 down, 74,000,000 to go! Way to go Tesla. I hope you dominate the market in the coming years.
      Maddoxx
      • 2 Years Ago
      I drove by Tesla's Fremont plant last weekend. The parking lot was almost empty. You'd think there'd be a ton of workers working weekends to fullfill all those orders.
        r.gk
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Maddoxx
        I thought the CEO is trying to get the workers to produce more cars. May be a Union issue that may kill a great auto company. Something smells here.
        Rob Mahrt
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Maddoxx
        Must made a statement on the latest earnings about overtime, it doesn't sound like overtime, especially for factory workers, will be very common until the lines are operating at full capacity, meaning 400cars/week. At this point they could provide for overtime if demand is higher than expected.
      Anne
      • 2 Years Ago
      The first non-founder Sig was delivered to Jason Calacanis on 11th of August. The latest known delivery is VIN #0037 on 28th of August. That is 37 cars in 18 days. About 15 cars per week. They started off with 5 cars per week in July. Tesla promised the delivery of 500 vehicles in the 3rd quarter. Still 420 cars to go, 80 per week. The projected fabrication rate for the assembly line is 400 cars per week. So they could satisfy their shareholders by ramping up to 200 per week in the last two weeks of September. Even on the Tesla forums people start to worry that Tesla might miss their target. And so it might look for the entire quarter. but then, in the nick of time, they flip a switch and the factory spits out 400 cars. Anything can still happen (what an insight! ;)
      Giza Plateau
      • 2 Years Ago
      But only about 50 have been delivered, maybe not even that many.
        PR
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Giza Plateau
        Source?
        Grendal
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Giza Plateau
        "But only about 50 have been delivered, maybe not even that many." So what? If the production is happening and increasing then they are succeeding. With lots of cars on the road then new sales will increase. But at the present time sales are not a problem, they have over 13,000 people waiting to get their car.
          theflew
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Grendal
          @Anne - By faith I mean the stock holders and investors. At some point you have to hit milestones. The first test will be the 500 by end of September which will be good, if they make it. But another 4,500 by years end is a stretch even with pent up demand. They could outsell the Volt and Leaf if they do that in the 4th quarter. @PR - The Volt's early sales numbers where more a function of the battery fire scandal than anything else. The Volt is not perfect by any means, but it's launch outside of the test fire(s) has been pretty smooth given it's dual nature. Fisker has proven it's not easy to do an EREV design.
          Anne
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Grendal
          @theflew Losing good faith? to whom? What faith? Nonsense. Until now they have delivered upon all of their promises wrt the Model S, and in some respects overdelivered. The promise is 500 by end of Q3 and 5000 by end of 2012. Afaik it is now 24th of August, and not 30th of September and certainly not 31th of December. So many people are just like you, thinking they know better what Tesla should or shouldn't do. Tesla will do what needs to be done to achieve what they set out to do. And if some armchair CEO doesn't like it, then so be it.
          theflew
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Grendal
          The problem is they are running out of money and losing good faith. Personally, I would be delivering the vehicles to real customers and not Tesla executives/friends, etc.. If Tesla is not near their 5000 number by years end their stock price will drop fast, because that really puts into doubt the 20k-30k vehicles next year. This is no different than the Leaf production at some point it's a supple or demand issue. With Tesla it is supple, but they don't have the cash to continue building at this pace. GM is currently the only builder that has shown they can match supply/demand in these early stages of EV's.
          krona2k
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Grendal
          Well I'm a small time Tesla stockholder, Tesla was always a massive gamble so I don't really see your point. Believe I the product and invest, as I have done or don't and sell up, simple. This is real investing how it used to be.
          PR
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Grendal
          theflew said "GM is currently the only builder that has shown they can match supply/demand in these early stages of EV's" That might be somewhat true currently. But you seem to be forgetting all the early Volt vs. Leaf sales blogs where the Volt was being killed by the Leaf on sales numbers. If you look back at the actual history, the Volt very much had issues with sales in the early days. So it is a bit disingenuous to compare the current situation for the Volt, ~20 months after they began production, to Tesla on their first 2 months.
      Marcopolo
      • 2 Years Ago
      The best news is that Tesla Motors is once again producing and delivering the world most exciting EV ! Tesla can afford to be patient and get the quality right, since the buyers seem equally loyal and patient about delivery schedules. Tesla's cash flow position, is a different matter. Elon Musk has stated that Tesla has adequate cash reserves to ensure that the quality of the Model S is not harmed by the need to ramp up too quickly. It's simply to early to make any predictions. Good luck Tesla !
        theflew
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Marcopolo
        This is the one area I give GM credit for with the Volt. When the Volt went live it was live and they ramped up production to the production launch date. Tesla basically started production on the production launch date and is ramping up very slowly. I was shocked to hear Tesla was making changes to the design after they technically went to production. Some appear small, but changes once you start production are costly in time and money.
          Grendal
          • 2 Years Ago
          @theflew
          @theflew GM and other "big" automakers have the history to know what fundamental needs a buying customer has. Until they got the Model S into customers hands doing the basic things a customer does as they drive and got a response back from those customers Tesla had to guess what was needed. GM, Ford, Mercedes, and all the others have all that part of the car buying equation down. Tesla had to learn it and readjust on the fly. It was all the small things like better cup holders and vanity lights that caused the delay.
          PR
          • 2 Years Ago
          @theflew
          theflew - That is why I mentioned that Chevy shut down their entire line for retooling between the 2011 and 2012 model year Volts. They actually made a significant number of changes, many of which you can see if you compare the standard feature lists between the 2011 and 2012 Volts. Other changes were made that weren't so obvious. But changes were definitely made during that retooling. My point is just that constant changes and updates are actually pretty standard in the industry. Try looking up parts for cars in manufacture's parts lists, and you will quickly find part after part that is listed as having a superceded part number. Where an old part number is replaced by a new part number. Building a car for a year exactly the same way the very first one was built doesn't happen. Production is an iterative process, where improvements are constantly being made throughout the life of a model.
          Marcopolo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @theflew
          theflew I appreciate your point, but then again GM is a lot bigger than Tesla.
          PR
          • 2 Years Ago
          @theflew
          theflew -- You forget that Tesla actually began production ahead of schedule. So a slower ramp-up has little meaning on the overall end of year target. I also think your characterization of GM's production launch is false. Even GM started with reduced numbers for months before kicking up production numbers. They didn't start true serious Volt production until after they shut down the entire line for retooling in July of 2011. Only after the retooling of the line did the Volt start going out in huge numbers. Tesla is simply taking the time now to do Tesla's equivalent of GM's retooling shutdown.
          theflew
          • 2 Years Ago
          @theflew
          PR My point isn't necessary the exact number of cars produced by Tesla as much as it seems like they are still making design changes which should have been fleshed out prior to production. I understand true production issues (parts not fitting right, build procedure changes). I know they are not going to be the hundreds of cars GM built, but you can't tell me some of these issues shouldn't have been dealt with prior to full production.
      PR
      • 2 Years Ago
      So 50 units in 12 working days between George Blankenship's 8/2 blog, and his latest 8/21 blog. So roughly 4 cars a day. Not bad, but they have to get up to roughly 80 cars a day to hit their 2013 target of 20,000 units a year. I'm going to guess that the reason George Blankenship choose to do an update on the numbers mid-month is that they are now ramping up to a higher production level, and this will allow for folks to figure out how fast the next level of production is by doing the math again. If in another 12 working days they have built 200 more units, then we will know they are at roughly 16 cars a day.
        Grendal
        • 2 Years Ago
        @PR
        In the same blog post George says they will be ramping up this week and he will give a progress report in his next post. Elon tweeted a picture of the final prep area showing a line of Model S's. I think Tesla is contemplating increasing the number of Model S's they are going to build next year. Demand seems to be increasing as they got about 1500 reservations last month. Elon has mentioned 30K a couple of times. This could easily be accomplished by adding an extra shift as they are currently only running one shift.
          theflew
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Grendal
          If I was Tesla I would aim low and over achieve. I don't think we know what the market is for $57k+ EV.
      Greg
      • 2 Years Ago
      I sat in a Model S in one of their stores last week. It's nice, and like it a lot, but that control screen is a monstrosity. If in a few years they make a midsize without the screen, it will be one I'd consider.
        kidcharlemgne
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Greg
        Yes I remember when rotary phones and telegrams were a thing. Can we make that a thing again?
        Anne
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Greg
        I had my "what a monstrosity" moment when I took my 46" tv out of the box. Now I want a bigger one.
        Grendal
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Greg
        The touchscreen won't be going away. They might add a few more convenience buttons but touchscreens are here to stay and start seeing more of them in other cars as well. I agree with you that the 17" touchscreen is a bit overkill for my tastes. I'm looking forward to a much smaller one for the Gen III/Bluestar but I do know it will still have a touchscreen.
      fridintl
      • 2 Years Ago
      when would reservation number 1011 be delivered?
      methos1999
      • 2 Years Ago
      screw the "delivery experience specialist" - if I were to buy one of these I'd want to be able to drive it out of the factory!
        kidcharlemgne
        • 2 Years Ago
        @methos1999
        Although you have the option to take delivery any which way you please, I think screwing the delivery specialist is off limits.
        PR
        • 2 Years Ago
        @methos1999
        Factory delivery is one delivery option, if you choose. It is another option along with Tesla Personalized Delivery to bring your Model S to where ever you want it personally delivered. Or you can pick your Model S up at any Tesla store.
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