Sanya Skypump
  • Sanya Skypump
  • Sanya Skypump

  • Sanya Skypump
  • Sanya Skypump

  • Sanya Skypump
  • Sanya Skypump

  • Sanya Skypump
  • Sanya Skypump

  • Sanya Skypump
  • Sanya Skypump

  • Sanya Skypump
  • Sanya Skypump

  • Sanya Skypump
  • Sanya Skypump

  • Sanya Skypump
  • Sanya Skypump

Sometimes, a clever name sends a clear, defining message. With the Skypump, Urban Green Energy and GE, have portmanteued two simple words about their new product – a wind-powered electric vehicle charging station – into a name that says, hey, this is something different.

Of course, the idea of a wind-powered EV isn't new (see this, this or this), but that shouldn't stop us from getting excited about any and all renewable energy methods that can power up a car. And that's just what drivers can now do at Cespa's global headquarters near Barcelona, Spain, where the first Skypump has been installed (about eight months behind schedule). As you can see in the picture above (and even better in the gallery), the Skypump takes the typical wind turbine design and compacts it into something that works in an urban setting. It's called the UGE 4K wind turbine and it's 42 feet tall and needs a minimum wind speed of seven miles per hour to operate. The energy generated by the wind which is sent to a Level 2 GE Durastation down below. It doesn't look like the electricity can be stored if a car isn't connected.

GE and UGE will install more Sanya Skypumps later this year in the U.S. and Australia, at "shopping malls, universities and other locations."
Show full PR text
Urban Green Energy and GE Announce First Sanya Skypump Installation
World's First Integrated Wind-Powered Electric Vehicle Charging Station Installed in Barcelona


BARCELONA, SPAIN - August 14, 2012 - Urban Green Energy (UGE) and GE (NYSE: GE) have unveiled the world's first integrated wind-powered electric vehicle charging station. The innovative Sanya Skypump pairs UGE's cutting-edge vertical wind turbines with GE's electric vehicle (EV) charging technology to offer completely clean energy to power electric vehicles.

Installed by UGE Iberia, the Spanish branch of New York-based Urban Green Energy, the first wind-powered EV charging station is located at Cespa's global headquarters near Barcelona. Cespa is the environmental services subsidiary of Ferrovial Servicios, the world's largest private transportation infrastructure investor.

More Sanya Skypumps will be installed later this year in the U.S. and Australia at shopping malls, universities and other locations.

The integrated system incorporates both the energy production capacity of UGE's 4K wind turbine and the EV charging capability of the GE Durastation in a single unit, with all required electrical systems located within the tower.

Designed for commercial and government customers, the Sanya Skypump combines environmental benefits with a strong statement to customers and the public.

"Since launching the Sanya Skypump, we have received inquiries from companies around the world that are looking to embrace sustainability," said Nick Blitterswyk, CEO of UGE. "The Sanya Skypump is one of those rare products that enable institutions to demonstrate their commitment to the environment while providing a really useful service as well."

The Sanya Skypump delivers power through a GE DuraStation EV charger, which enables faster charging using higher voltages.

Charles Elazar, marketing director of GE Energy Management's Industrial Solutions business in Europe, says, "GE is launching a family of electric vehicle charging systems in Europe offering domestic and commercial users a range of easy-to-use, flexible systems to help make electric vehicles a practical, everyday reality."

GE is a keen supporter of electric vehicles and has announced plans to purchase 25,000 electric vehicles by 2015 for use as company cars and to lease to corporate customers through its Fleet Services business.

About Urban Green Energy

With installations in over 65 countries, including installations for several government agencies and Fortune 100 companies, UGE is changing the face of distributed renewable energy. UGE puts users in control of their energy source by designing and manufacturing more versatile wind turbines and hybrid wind/solar systems for use in applications ranging from residential to commercial, from suburban US homeowners to off-grid telecoms towers in rural Africa. Visit www.urbangreenenergy.com today to learn how together we can create a greener tomorrow.

About GE

GE (NYSE: GE) works on things that matter. The best people and the best technologies taking on the toughest challenges. Finding solutions in energy, health and home, transportation and finance. Building, powering, moving and curing the world. Not just imagining. Doing. GE works. For more information, visit the company's website at www.ge.com.

GE Energy works connecting people and ideas everywhere to create advanced technologies for powering a cleaner, more productive world. With more than 100,000 employees in over 100 countries, our diverse portfolio of product and service solutions and deep industry expertise help our customers solve their challenges locally. We serve the energy sector with technologies in such areas as natural gas, oil, coal and nuclear energy; wind, solar, biogas and water processing; energy management; and grid modernization. We also offer integrated solutions to serve energy- and water-intensive industries such as mining, metals, marine, petrochemical, food & beverage and unconventional fuels.

Follow GE's Industrial Solutions business on Twitter @GEindustrial and @GE_WattStation.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 14 Comments
      Ziv
      • 2 Years Ago
      I have always thought that cities should encourage the installation of wind generators on the roofs of high rise buildings. They would never be a huge source of electricity, but they would be a huge reminder that wind is always out there somewhere.
        Anne
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ziv
        It is a tough nut to crack, an affordable urban turbine that actually produces something worthwhile. There are three problems 1. Cost 2. Turbulence 3. Vibrations (preferably you have to install on a separate mast, not on your roof) 4. Noise There have been some innovative ideas, but until now, the cost have been high and the yields generally low. Much more research and development is needed. There is a test field in Schoondijke, Zeeland that measures how much these small turbines generate. It is located in a polder, away from buildings and rather close to the sea. A much better location than most urban turbines will encounter. The results are rather meagre and the best machines are the familiar 3 blade horizontal axis turbines. It seems that the more futuristic the design, the higher the cost and lower the yield. I have to see if any urban wind turbine will ever cost effectively produce power. For now, PV is a much better choice in urban areas. http://www.zeeland.nl/digitaalarchief/zee0801257 (in Dutch, but the units are SI and the numbers Arabic, so should be no problem).
        Ryan
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ziv
        They aren't a large source until you have tens of thousands of them. They will add up.
      PeterScott
      • 2 Years Ago
      "the Sanya Skypump combines environmental benefits with a strong statement to customers and the public." AKA complete boondoggle in greenwashed clothing.
      Joeviocoe
      • 2 Years Ago
      If the energy cannot be stored, and the charger is not tied to the grid... this cannot work for a public station. Work and Home charging only....where the same car can sit for hours getting intermittent power at several different power levels.
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Joeviocoe
        Not to mention the fact that in the locations where people live in the US, around 95% do not have a high enough average wind speed to make small wind turbines even remotely practical. There is a reason that turbines for the grid are built big and high, and in optimal locations.
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          In most locations they are simply an excellent way to waste money. A few of the reputable builder's provide links to the NREL site so that you can read off the average wind speed in your area. Most don't worry their, or their customers about such trivia as average output, and are perfectly content for them to waste their/ the government's money. These are some of the few ways of generating energy where it actually seems possible that the output will not pay back the manufacturing and installation costs in energy terms. These characters wish to compound that by only using the power when a car happens to be plugged in, as well as when the wind happens to be blowing strongly enough to generate any power. I leave aside the awful reliability record of these turbines. Pure eco-bling.
        ABG Sebastian
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Joeviocoe
        That's a good point. I'm not sure if it can connect to the grid, but that would make sense.
      Joeviocoe
      • 2 Years Ago
      I don't know the specs for this turbine... but if it can be cheaply built, and at 42 feet high.. it may be practical. But the car would need to be parked there for a while every day. It would not be smart to "rely" on this power. But as supplement, it can be a huge benefit. Even in most of the country. As long as 42 feet is above any obstructions.
      Ele Truk
      • 2 Years Ago
      According to Mitt Romney "you can't drive a car with a windmill on it". First off, you can: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bkcn8ZkvKKc And contrary to Mitt, you can drive a car with wind power.
      Marcopolo
      • 2 Years Ago
      Whether this particular design is worth the money, I can't tell. But once you get past the eastern divide in Australia, an ever present feature of the vast landscape is small rickety windmills that sit atop water bores (wells) and pump up artesian water for live stock. (much like the SW of the USA). Every farm used to have one for pumping water from storage tanks to the house or farm buildings. I am wondering about the suitability of this design to do both jobs. Provide power for agri-EV's and water. A small, economical, energy storage facility , would be a useful invention.
        Ele Truk
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Marcopolo
        Iconic windmills are a staple of old westerns. But they wouldn't work these days because the water level has been lowered so much that these windmills don't have enough power to raise the water.
      Fons Jena
      • 2 Years Ago
      Small scale wind power is not a material/energy efficient solution. These projects are better than nothing but wind power generation should happen offshore or at least far from cities... Wind is still much better than photovoltaic thought, I doubt that all these solar panels I see on roofs will be decently recycled. However here is a windmill design that I find very interesting and has potential for small scale and off the grid power generation: http://www.windtronics.com/home
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Fons Jena
        Hahaha you have no idea what you are talking about. You say small wind is not a viable alternative, then you promote the biggest joke of a product in the industry, the windtronics. Do 5 minutes of research in this market and get back to me "Fons", if that is your real name. Sounds made up bro.
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