We'll cut right to the chase: Land Rover will be releasing official information on the 2013 Range Rover very, very soon, but as to be expected, the first few images of the new SUV have leaked onto the internet.

The big daddy Range Rover uses full design cues pulled from the smaller Evoque – the headlamp corners that are swept back over the front quarter panel, for example – but we have to admit, this thing looks more like a one-off Ford Flex than a sleek new Land Rover. Most of us on staff prefer the design of the current SUV, at least on the basis of these leaked images. We'll wait until we see the full brace of images and get an in-person look before we write it off as being unattractive.

We'll have official details coming soon, but it's safe to say that the new Range Rover will be lighter than its predecessor, thanks to an aluminum frame and lightweight components throughout the body. We fully expect V8 power to be on tap for the U.S., but don't rule out the use of Jaguar Land Rover's new 3.0-liter supercharged V6, either. Stay tuned for more information.

UPDATE: Even more photos have been leaked, courtesy of Russian site AutoWP (via CarScoop). Check them out in our high-res gallery above.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 72 Comments
      Daekwan
      • 2 Years Ago
      I dont want to over judge it from a few 'leaked' pictures. But it definitely doesnt have the statue that Range Rovers of past are well known for. I agree it does look like a Ford product with little to no aggressive styling & stance. Time will tell, and the competition is always catching up. But if this is the real deal for next generation, expect the top-of-the-hill Range Rover to be alot less popular.
      paulwilson05
      • 2 Years Ago
      Ghastly.
      Ernie Mccracken
      • 2 Years Ago
      They should have spent all of the R&D and design budget on improving reliability. That is really the only thing they needed. What were they thinking?
      xmailboxcancerx
      • 2 Years Ago
      I kinda half-snickered when I saw the headlights and grill resembling a certain Ford Explorer (I can give them that), but then LOL'ed when I saw the tail light shape! IT'S AN EXPLORER! HAA! Even still, it's very, very, very handsome. The irony here is a great addition to this svelte, attractive package. Still a fan, just wish I could take out a small mortgage to pay for one. Nice.
      Traction Control
      • 2 Years Ago
      Um, before Land-Rover fans get all high-and-mighty (eyeing you "markscomments") claiming Ford copied Land-Rover, let’s examine who got what first, and why. The new 2011-present Explorer (U502) looks a lot like the Range Rover family because its chief designer engineer was Jim Holland (an American), who also happened to be the chief designer engineer for the current Range Rover (L322). He was responsible for the (then) new Range Rover’s design and migration from body-on-frame to monocoque (unibody). So, the current Range Rover that every loves so good, is nothing less than a compliment of his work in design leadership. Jim Holland originally worked for Ford, left to work at Land-Rover (while it was owned by BMW) where he revolutionized their design work, and is now currently back with Ford. Ford itself has used those stepped-style headlamps for quite some time now. They showed up on the Expedition (U324) in 2006 for the 2007 model year; the Range Rover Evoque Concept (with its stepped-style headlamps) appeared in 2008. Also the Evoque did not feature stepped-style tail lamps, which uniquely appeared only the 2011 Explorer (U502). So the Range Rover’s stepped-style headlamps and tail lamps are a variation of the Explorer’s headlamp and tail lamp design. Ford gave Land-Rover its roll stability control (RSC) system (Ford holds over 80 patents for RSC) with roll-rate sensors and software and Land-Rover gave Ford its Terrain Response system, called Terrain Management in the Explorer. So the technology tradeoff was fair.
        markscomments
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Traction Control
        Traction Control - Why does Ford need to copy Land Rover, Jaguar and Aston Martin. The initial Ford Explorer America CONCEPT from 2008 was original looking! And it looked like a proper Ford Explorer. The current Ford Explorer has soooo many TRADITIONAL Land Rover/Range Rover design cues - the clamshell bonnet, the blacked out pillars and the floating roof and more recently the E X P L O R E R lettering on the front. This new Range Rover looks like a proper Range Rover! The current Ford Explorer and Flex look like what?????????? I guess Land Rover should be flattered?
      Andre Neves
      • 2 Years Ago
      Going backwards in styling are we?
        Andre Neves
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Andre Neves
        ...and what's with all the gills everywhere? I know it's shark week and all...
      Dark Gnat
      • 2 Years Ago
      It looks very "Flex"ible.
      peakarach1
      • 2 Years Ago
      lol! Everything's look the same except the headlight and taillight.
      William
      • 2 Years Ago
      Boring. It looks like a Ford flex
      Jonathan
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'm starting to like Land Rover less and less as time goes by. They've stopped making off road looking luxury suvs and are now focusing on luxury crossover looking things. The ML looks more rugged than this. That being said, it's not awful. If it were higher from the ground and a little shorter, it would be alright. I much rather have the current model than this one. Those tail lights are EMBARRASSING. How can Land Rover steal from Ford? This is not cool.
      KAG
      • 2 Years Ago
      Not bad, a evolution of the current model. Those are some really low profile tires for off roading.
      capndave319
      • 2 Years Ago
      What a piece of crap. It doesn't matter what they look like (mainly boring). They're too expensive to break down as often as they do. Expensive to fix, expensive to maintain. You'd better figure in another $4000 for an extended warranty. You're gonna need it.
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