As we suspected yesterday, the first official word from Fisker about the Karma that caught fire in Woodside, CA this weekend is that the lithium ion batteries are apparently not to blame. Fisker has released a statement, which you can find below, which says that independent investigators from Pacific Rim Investigative Group are looking into the cause of the blaze:

Evidence revealed thus far supports the fact that the ignition source was not the Lithium-ion battery pack, new technology components or unique exhaust routing.
The area of origin for the fire was determined to be outside the engine compartment. There was no damage to the passenger compartment and there were no injuries
.

More information will be released when Fisker and the investigators have something to report. To see a video of the fire and read our original report, click here.

According to the National Fire Protection Association (PDF), between 2005 and 2009, there have been 1,150 spontaneous vehicle fires, half of those in passenger vehicles. So, just under 600 vehicles burn for no known reason in an average year, out of a national fleet of around 250 million vehicles. Two Karma fires in four months is thus noteworthy, especially given the newness of the technology and general worries about the safety of li-ion batteries. According to Fisker, though, it's not something to panic about.

While we await further details of this investigation, scroll down to read Fisker's official statement.
Show full PR text
Fisker engineers, working with independent investigators from Pacific Rim Investigative Group, have begun preliminary examination and testing on the Karma involved in a fire in Woodside, California Friday, August 10.

Evidence revealed thus far supports the fact that the ignition source was not the Lithium-ion battery pack, new technology components or unique exhaust routing.

The area of origin for the fire was determined to be outside the engine compartment. There was no damage to the passenger compartment and there were no injuries.

Continued investigative efforts will be primarily focused within the specific area of origin, located forward of the driver's side front tire.

Further details will be announced after a full report is completed.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 31 Comments
      Stinkyboy
      • 2 Years Ago
      the dude spilled his Courvoisier, then his joint fell out of his mouth and the rest is a no brainer.
      Classic_Engr
      • 2 Years Ago
      The proximity of some components to the turbocharger and exhaust system in that area might be a good place to start. Better heat shields and some re-packaging may be in order.
      over9000
      • 2 Years Ago
      Yeah, you go Fisker, blame it on China.
      wongtpa
      • 2 Years Ago
      Can you spell, "junk"?
      MONTEGOD7SS
      • 2 Years Ago
      Wasn't the battery, just the connection to the battery. Semantics is everything.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      gary
      • 2 Years Ago
      Imagine the carbon tax on that inferno.
      kuntknife
      • 2 Years Ago
      Dear Karma, No one cares *what* caused the fire in the car, it's the fact that they apparently set themselves ablaze. Signed, A flamable human
      benhmt@me.com
      • 2 Years Ago
      Be Green, drive an electric car that releases toxin's in the air when it catches on fire.
      Sparky5229
      • 2 Years Ago
      Won't buy one any way
      marc.mitchell
      • 2 Years Ago
      Henrik, I see problems.
      Gorgenapper
      • 2 Years Ago
      Fisker blames fire on something other than the battery? Shocking. Did any of you see this coming? I certainly didn't.
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