One of the largest traits that research says stands out among the growing legion of Generation Y car buyers is that they are more concerned about the environment than previous generations.

In order to woo them, automakers have geared their advertising toward all things green, even if their products can't quite match the hype.

Environmentalists have labeled this phenomenon of making a product appear to be more environmentally benign than it actually is "greenwashing." They may not do much to actually lessen pollution, but they make people feel greener.

"The ad industry has stepped up to make you feel better about the things that are not green by making them feel green," Graeme Newell, president of 602 Communications, a marketing research firm, told The Huffington Post.

A while back, our friends at The Huffington Post have cobbled together 5 examples of greenwashed advertising that were produced by the auto industry and put together this look at some of the worst offenders.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 7 Comments
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 2 Days Ago
      Yay, ads.
      Peter
      • 2 Days Ago
      i·ro·ny [ahy-ruh-nee, ahy-er-] noun When an article on how cars are being greenwashed while they and the infrastructure that supports them, consume vast amounts of natural resources and energy, is reposted on autoblog green
      george costanza
      • 2 Days Ago
      however not everybody is dumb in US. nobody paid more for accord hybrid which hybrid power just boosted top end and did nothing for efficiency. so it was not produced again. next yr. a new accord hybrid is out. interesting to see if honda learned their lesson...gas is up to four bucks AGAIN in more volatile post peak oil period of civilization...40 is the new 20 in fuel mileage.
      PR
      • 2 Days Ago
      On the other hand, some "green" ads are absolutely hilarious, like the ads with gas powered hair dryers, and gas powered blenders, and a little gas filling station for gas powered laptops...
        george costanza
        • 2 Days Ago
        @PR
        that was a funny ad. that wasn't greenwashing though. wasnt it selling the all electric leaf? about as good as you can do right now!
          EZEE
          • 2 Days Ago
          @george costanza
          George, you made a great point and you weren't angry. Good job! :)
      EZEE
      • 2 Days Ago
      Lots of 'well duh' articles lately. Green is the new thing, hence a powerful, turbo charged engine becomes, 'Eco-Boost.' Eco-tech, and whatever else. Companies want to jump on the bandwagon in anyway they can. There is a fuel cell powered focus that drives around town - painted top to bottom about how cool the local utility is for having it. Ditto on a Mitsubishi iMev. One company has an electric truck. Painted top to bottom with green stuff and screaming letters on HOW MUCH THEY CARE. I know my Beloved Ford Ranger isn't especially green, but it is flex fuel and ULEV. The thing I depend on when making fun of liberal friends vehicles is that they do not have any idea about certain things. Like, yes, it is flex fuel, but I know of only a few gas stations where I can put E85 in it (the Florida turnpike is pretty good though). On a couple of occasions, I knew that their vehicles had an ULEV rating or better, but (corrected) guessed they had no idea what the emission rating of their vehicle was. The point is, ignore the ads and educate yourself, if buying green is important. Not to sound like Dan, but, an Escalade hybrid is not especially green.