Suspended NASCAR driver AJ Allmendinger claims he was given the pill that led to his suspension by a friend of a friend, in a Fox Sports report. Allmendinger says he was out with a "buddy" following several sponsor commitments, and revealed to his friend that he was not sleeping well. Allmendinger says he was struggling to stay awake when "One of his friends said, 'Oh I have an energy pill that I take for working out'."

That evening occurred three days prior to testing positive for amphetamine during a random drug test at Kentucky Speedway on 6/29. NASCAR officials determined what they found on him were the same chemical compound as found in Adderall.

Allmendinger was quiet regarding that evening up until this point. "I had to do some soul searching before I came out publicly" he told Fox Sports.

Per NASCAR's no-tolerance policy, Allmendinger was suspended from the following weekend's Daytona race. According to the suspended driver, it had not even occurred to him that the pill he took three days before the race was a banned substance.

Following the suspension, Allmandinger, who was in his sixth year in NASCAR, lost his ride. He was released from Penske racing and is now taking the steps to get back into racing. He has made plans to enter NASCAR's Road to Recovery program, hoping it will lead to his reinstatement.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 32 Comments
      flychinook
      • 2 Years Ago
      Totally feasible! I can't even count the number of times that I've accepted pills from friends, attempting to cure undiagnosed, non-specific ailments. Oh wait, I can. It's zero. What a twit.
        Agilis
        • 2 Years Ago
        @flychinook
        I agree with you 100%. However, sharing over the counter medicine, like Tylenol, Aspirin, Advil, on a friend's suggestion is not unheard of. Sharing prescription medication is usually against the law.
      Gorgenapper
      • 2 Years Ago
      He would have been more convincing if he had said that he was being chased by a bear, tripped over a rock, landed face first into a stash of said pills and accidentally inhaled one of them up his nostril.
      karman876
      • 2 Years Ago
      Would a responsible person take an 'energy pill' from a friend of a friend? Would a person who gets tested regularly take that pill? I didn't think so.
      bleexeo
      • 2 Years Ago
      Anyone who competes and is tested for drugs yet still pops a buddy's Adderall into their mouth deserves to get FIRED and BANNED - if nothing else for sheer and complete stupidity. Allmendinger is a total tool.
      John
      • 2 Years Ago
      I am inclined to believe his story but need to add, what an IDIOT. Every kid in elementary school knows never to "Try" something that looks like a pill, even if it is from a friend. Hasn't baseball taught us anything? "No senator, I thought it was just vitamins in the syringe that my trainer giving to me twice a day."
        StephenT
        • 2 Years Ago
        @John
        You're right. The whole story does sound half way believable but if you're an athlete/driver you don't take ANYTHING you don't know the origin of.
          k_m94
          • 2 Years Ago
          @StephenT
          If you're in possession of 2 brain cells yous shouldn't take "medication" you don't know about.
          Gorgenapper
          • 2 Years Ago
          @StephenT
          ^ Yeah, I mean....if you're feeling down or tired, you don't just go to the nearest pharmacy and start downing every pill you can lay your hands on. Even less so when a 'friend', who OBVIOUSLY knows you're a professional race car driver under strict observation for controlled substances, gives you 'a pill' to help with your work out.
      Nowuries
      • 2 Years Ago
      Ah yes, another great example of our current generation's affinity to not accept any personal responsibility for the bad things that happen as a result of our poor choices. He made the choice to take the pill that he "supposedly" had no idea what it was, and he made the choice to trust someone he didn't know. Too bad, so sad. I would respect him more if he recognized HE made the mistake due to his poor choice, not his friend's friend.
      johnhkart
      • 2 Years Ago
      Yea and why would you need drugs like amphetamine based adderall to work out anyway??? Stupid. And me too, amount of times my friends have handed me a pill to stay awake? Zero.
      Jacob
      • 2 Years Ago
      Cool story, bro.
      septhinox
      • 2 Years Ago
      So on up to it and take your punishment for taking unknown pills.
      Nick
      • 2 Years Ago
      And what did we learn about taking pills that aren't ours, AJ?
      Keldon
      • 2 Years Ago
      "Ohhhhhh, so THAT'S how it happened. We didn't realize it was your buddies pill, that changes everything."
      Dwight Bynum Jr.
      • 2 Years Ago
      Am I missing something here? How exactly is Adderall on the "banned substance list" when it's perfectly legal and widely prescribed? Was it the fact that he took it that got him banned, or the fact that he took it without a prescription?
        Jason
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dwight Bynum Jr.
        I believe that it is the latter. You can certainly inform NASCAR that you have a valid prescription upfront, and I assume if you had a legal prescription to explain a result even after the test that you would be excused or given some leeway.
        Generic
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dwight Bynum Jr.
        It's a drug prescribed for ADHD and is often taken by people who don't really need to to get an advantage in the ability to learn faster, think harder. It's a cheater tool for students. Even with a prescription, I doubt such a drug would be allowed. If he really had ADHD, I doubt he could have made it as a race car driver.
        Kip
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dwight Bynum Jr.
        Just because it's legal doesn't mean a governing board can't make it a banned or limited substance for competing. Caffeine is labeled as a restricted substance by the IOC, US Olympic Committee and NCAA. If a competitor has too much in their system, they can be DQ'd.
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