2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

Two new announcements about Ford and its upcoming C-Max line of vehicles arrived today, emphasizing the vehicles' efficiency and electric performance.

For the C-Max Hybrid, the previously predicted miles per gallon rating of 47 mpg is now official, per the EPA, and will apply across the board. That means city, highway and combined mileage ratings are all 47. As anyone Ford can reach with a PR blast knows, this beats at least one of the mpg numbers for the Toyota Prius V by seven mpg. The world's most popular hybrid lineup, in V guise, gets 44 mpg in the city, 40 on the highway and 42 combined. The standard Prius Liftback version, of course, gets 51 city, 48 highway and 50 combined.

More interesting, perhaps, is the news that the plug-in Energi model will be able to go up to 85 miles per hour in all-electric mode. Once again, Ford is hammering the Prius comparison, saying that speed is "more than 20 mph higher than Toyota Prius plug-in." The C-Max Hybrid can go up to 62 miles an hour in EV mode.

To engage EV mode in the C-Max Energi, Ford uses a "unique EV mode button allows customers to deliver electric power on-demand." We're not sure what makes it unique (other plug-ins have powertrain mode selector buttons), but it does have three modes: EV Now (where the car is only moved by battery power, as long as it's available), EV Auto (normal operation, with both battery and gas engine used for propulsion) or EV Later, a "battery-saving mode that reserves the pack power for later use." (Think of the Chevrolet Volt mountain mode.) The Energi goes on sale in limited areas this fall and nationwide in early 2013.

Oh, Ford also says, "With a fully charged battery, C-MAX Energi is rated at 195 horsepower, versus 188 horsepower for Toyota Prius." It's pretty clear which competitors Ford is going after here, isn't it?
Show full PR text
Ford C-MAX Energi Delivers Industry's Top Electric-Only Speed Among Plug-In Hybrids at the Touch of a Button
  • All-new Ford C-MAX Energi delivers the top electric-only speed of any plug-in hybrid – 85 mph – more than 20 mph higher than Toyota Prius plug-in; unique EV mode button allows customers to deliver electric power on-demand
  • C-MAX Energi – Ford's first plug-in hybrid – also tops Prius plug-in in overall range (550 miles versus 540 miles), more than triple the electric-only range (20-plus miles versus six miles)
  • C-MAX Energi plug-in hybrid begins arriving this fall at EV Certified Ford dealers in 19 markets, followed by nationwide rollout in all 50 states in early 2013
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich., Aug. 7, 2012 – At the touch of a button, Ford C-MAX Energi plug-in hybrid drivers can enjoy the industry's top electric-only speed among all plug-in hybrid vehicles – 85 mph.

Topping the Toyota Prius plug-in's top EV-only speed by more than 20 mph, the all-new, five-passenger Ford C-MAX Energi can easily keep pace with the flow of traffic, even when the EV mode button is engaged and the gasoline engine is off.

"We understand customers place a high value on the zero-emission electrified driving experience," said Ford Vice President of Powertrain Engineering Joe Bakaj. "This inspired our engineering team to equip the C-MAX Energi plug-in hybrid with a button that enables drivers to choose an electric-only driving mode."

With a fully charged battery, C-MAX Energi is rated at 195 horsepower, versus 188 horsepower for Toyota Prius.

C-MAX Energi's EV mode range is 20-plus miles – more than triple Toyota's plug-in and well within the one-way commute range of many American motorists. C-MAX Energi – Ford's first plug-in hybrid – also tops Prius plug-in in overall range (550 miles versus 540 miles).

Three EV modes
The EV mode button – conveniently mounted in the center stack – allows a driver to switch vehicle operation between three modes.

Drivers can opt for electric-only driving without gasoline engine power, normal hybrid mode where the powertrain melds electric and gasoline engine power as appropriate, or a battery-saving mode that reserves the pack power for later use. For an image of the EV mode button, click here.

When plug-in power is available, drivers can change modes with each press of the EV mode button. The mode currently selected is displayed in the driver's left instrument cluster screen.

EV: Auto
"In EV: Auto mode, the vehicle automatically takes advantage of plug-in charge," said Kevin Layden, Ford director of Electrification Programs and Engineering. "When the charge is depleted, C-MAX Energi operates as a full hybrid."

The powertrain computer automatically selects the appropriate blend of battery usage and engine usage based on demand and the state of battery charge.

EV: Now
In EV: Now mode, the vehicle operates in EV mode using plug-in power. The gasoline engine will not operate unless an override setting is selected or certain conditions are present such as the accelerator pedal being fully depressed and the driver enabling the gas engine. EV: Now also activates a special Manage EV screen to monitor functionality.

To achieve the EV range estimate shown on the corresponding gauge, drivers are given coaching cues to maximize EV mode. Additionally, use of climate power and energy gauges will further help drivers manage vehicle energy use.

EV: Later
The EV: Later setting saves plug-in power for later use, like transitioning from highway to lower-speed residential neighborhood use. C-MAX Energi operates in normal hybrid mode, using both gas engine and electric motor. Plug-in power is reserved until the driver switches to the EV: Now or EV: Auto setting.

"C-MAX Energi uses technology in new ways to provide customers smart choices in maximizing their energy usage based on where and how they drive their vehicles," Bakaj said.

Built at Ford's Michigan Assembly Plant in Wayne, Mich., the all-new C-MAX Energi plug-in hybrid begins arriving this fall at EV Certified Ford dealers in 19 markets, followed by nationwide rollout in all 50 states in early 2013.

# # #

About Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company, a global automotive industry leader based in Dearborn, Mich., manufactures or distributes automobiles across six continents. With about 168,000 employees and about 65 plants worldwide, the company's automotive brands include Ford and Lincoln. The company provides financial services through Ford Motor Credit Company. For more information regarding Ford and its products worldwide, please visit http://corporate.ford.com.


Ford C-MAX Hybrid Earns 47 City, 47 Highway, 47 Combined - an EPA Rating Hat Trick; Beats Toyota Prius v by up to 7 MPG

DEARBORN, Mich., Aug. 7, 2012 /PRNewswire/ --
  • All-new 2013 Ford C-MAX Hybrid delivers EPA-certified 47 mpg city, 47 mpg highway ratings – 7 mpg better than Toyota Prius v on the highway – for a 47 mpg combined rating
  • Ford's first hybrid to achieve equal city and highway ratings, the versatile C-MAX Hybrid also is expected to offer 15 class-exclusive features such as the available hands-free liftgate
  • C-MAX Hybrid launches this fall as part of Ford's power of choice strategy to deliver leading fuel economy across its lineup while tripling electrified vehicle production capacity by 2013
Ford Motor Company once again raises the hybrid fuel-economy bar with the all-new Ford C-MAX Hybrid, which is now officially EPA-certified at 47 mpg city, 47 mpg highway and 47 mpg combined – beating Toyota Prius v by up to 7 mpg.

The certification is significant because it makes C-MAX Hybrid the first hybrid vehicle to offer 47 mpg across the board. Also, hybrids traditionally have been more economical in city driving than on the highway, unlike conventional vehicles.

C-MAX Hybrid, however, returns the same fuel economy whether driving cross-country or across the city – stemming mostly from a growing list of Ford innovations that have helped the vehicle to deliver an impressive list of metrics, such as a top speed of up to 62 mph in EV mode.

"The all-new C-MAX Hybrid is a great symbol of how Ford has transformed into a fuel-economy and technology leader with 47 mpg across the board and a highway rating 7 mpg better than Toyota Prius v," said Ford Vice President of Powertrain Engineering Joe Bakaj. "We've done this with innovation – represented by nearly 500 hybrid patents – while driving costs down 30 percent so we can bring these fuel-saving vehicles to more customers."

Among the Ford innovations helping C-MAX Hybrid drivers enjoy maximum fuel economy are the patented SmartGauge® with EcoGuide that coaches for top fuel efficiency by providing growing green leaves in the gauge cluster as a reward for economical driving; and ECO Cruise, a feature that helps optimize powertrain elements for convenient yet economical highway travel.

City equals highway

Hybrid vehicle drivers traditionally saw superior fuel-economy figures in city driving, so loyalists maximized their fuel economy through regenerative braking in stop-and-go traffic. But now, higher-speed innovations have caught up on efficiency.

"City, highway and everywhere in between, C-MAX Hybrid is EPA-certified at 47 mpg," Bakaj said. "It's a win-win-win."

C-MAX Hybrid is expected to be America's most affordable hybrid utility vehicle with a base price of $25,995, including destination and delivery, which is $1,300 lower than Toyota Prius v. C-MAX Hybrid is currently available for order at select dealerships.

More information about C-MAX Hybrid and C-MAX Energi can be found here. Press releases, videos, photos and other material related to Ford's electrified vehicles can be found here.

About Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company (NYSE: F), a global automotive industry leader based in Dearborn, Mich., manufactures or distributes automobiles across six continents. With about 168,000 employees and about 65 plants worldwide, the company's automotive brands include Ford and Lincoln. The company provides financial services through Ford Motor Credit Company. For more information regarding Ford and its products worldwide, please visit http://corporate.ford.com.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 76 Comments
      CassB
      • 3 Years Ago
      188hp for the Prius? Thought it was 130ish..
        montoym
        • 3 Years Ago
        @CassB
        It is, in reality. They are adding together the electric motor's power and the ICE's peak HP as well to get that figure. But, in the real world, both are never available together and thus the net power is much lower at 134hp.
      oollyoumn
      • 3 Years Ago
      If this CUV can get 47/47, why doesn't Ford put this hybrid system into a car with the aerodynamics and weight of a Prius. It would be the mileage champ, but also have the ability to be fun to drive. I would even consider a 2-seater.
      AudiBmw
      • 3 Years Ago
      The Toyota Prius V has 134 net horsepower, not 188.
        Jason Krumvieda
        • 3 Years Ago
        @AudiBmw
        I wonder if it will come standard with the "holier than thou" complex that appears to come standard with the Prius and Volt.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Jason Krumvieda
          [blocked]
          axiomatik
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Jason Krumvieda
          You already sound like a douche....
      CarCrazy24
      • 3 Years Ago
      Wow that C-Max hybrid's mpg ratings are impressive, looks like a hybrid I can finally appreciate. Well done Ford!
      8krevver
      • 3 Years Ago
      Unfortunately it is American made crap which means that it is unreliable. I'd much rather get a Prius V... at least it will start every morning and will last past 20k miles. Sorry UAW trolls.
        Dean Hammond
        • 3 Years Ago
        @8krevver
        first idiot sighting...more to come...
        Walt
        • 3 Years Ago
        @8krevver
        You're going to push that saucy line a bit to far for my taste, boy.
        PICKLEBOY
        • 3 Years Ago
        @8krevver
        He makes a good point. In general the American car brands are unreliable especially in comparison with Toyota. but ford I would say is the best american brand you can buy
      mikeybyte1
      • 3 Years Ago
      Lots of misinformation and trolling on here. Shocker. Anyway, if you look at the specs of the Prius, Prius V and C-Max, you will notice that the C-Max falls dead in the middle of it's two competitors. Prius is 115.3cf interior, Prius V is 131.5, and C-Max 124.2. So Ford is justified in comparing it to the V since it is actually closer in size to it than the standard Prius. In both size and price and economy it falls right in between the two of them. So it's just another viable option in the high-mpg hybrid realm. Competition is always a good thing.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @mikeybyte1
        [blocked]
      Renaurd
      • 3 Years Ago
      The Ford is a much better looking automobile, I'm not much on the Prius.
      eblondmdboy24
      • 3 Years Ago
      Well actually the Volt is the best selling plug in car outselling the Prius Plug in by a wide margin. The Reason ford does not compair its car to the volt is because the Ford is bascially the same as a Prius. The Volt is a pure electric with a very powerfull electric motor. Has the peformance of a BMW and uses no gas. So the Ford and Toyota will have limited EV power and have to use the engine to get good power. The Volt is slightly more expensive but qualifys for a the full Gov rebate becuase it has a large battery so the cost is now brough down to the prius price. The volt is still the best value as I see it.
        artandcolour2010
        • 3 Years Ago
        @eblondmdboy24
        The Volt isn't "pure" electric. It has a small range-extending gas engine, too.
        Cheetahjab
        • 3 Years Ago
        @eblondmdboy24
        And the volt isn't a cuv/wagon.. it's 4 seater (at best) hatch.. sort of... SO yeah, again, moot comparison
        AddLightness
        • 3 Years Ago
        @eblondmdboy24
        Pure electric? Performance of a BMW? You must be mistaking the Volt for the Tesla Model S.
        wickedme91
        • 3 Years Ago
        @eblondmdboy24
        Are you kidding? Even after all rebates, Volt is like $10,000 costlier than a Prius. And comparing the performance to that of a BMW! God I hope your are drunk.
        Dean Hammond
        • 3 Years Ago
        @eblondmdboy24
        take it on a 3-400 mile trip then tell us how much "better" the volt is.........
          montoym
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dean Hammond
          quote from Dean Hammond: - "axiomatic, read the post.....montoym was expressing they were just for casual round town driving" - Please don't misrepresent what I have stated. I said, multiple times, that the majority of driving that people do is in short trips, daily commutes, errand running etc. Not the 3-400mile trips that you are so focused on. You, with your 70+mi daily commute are well outside the average whether you believe so or not. Me stating that, which is backed up by studies, does not meant that people "only" make short trips and that those trips are all that the Volt is good for. That is your incorrect interpretation of what I've stated. The point is that the Volt is good for those short trips and can also be used on the long trips that people do take on occasion. It is a vehicle that can serve as the only vehicle a person needs, unlike a true EV which has range limitations. Also, in comparing it to another hybrid or even other plug-ins like the Prius Plug-in or the C-Max Energi, the Volt does maintain a significant battery range advantage over both options. The Volt has a 35 mile EV range (38 miles for 2013), well above the 11miles that the Prius Plug-in has or the 20ish mile EV range quoted for the C-Max Energi. This additional range allows more individuals more time to drive without gasoline. As the average driver does drive 40miles or less per day, this allows them to potentially go about their entire day without using a single drop of gasoline and without having to recharge the battery. The Prius Plug-in or C-Max Energi do not offer this capability as readily due to their shorter EV ranges. Not to mention that both the Prius Plug-in and C-Max Energi also operate more like conventional hybrids even during their battery rundown time which means that the ICE can fire up if additional power is needed. The Prius Plug-in is well-known to use its ICE fairly often and we have yet to see reviews on the C-Max Energi to determine how it drives. The C-Max Energi does include an EVNow button that will use up the battery alone without ICE assistance, but again, we have yet to know how that will affect performance. With the Volt, the ICE will not fire up so long as there is sufficient battery life available, regardless of load or speed. There are a couple of exceptions to this rule however. There is a mountain mode that fires up the ICE earlier than normal in order to maintain a higher battery charge level and help performance during steep climbs. Also, during cold weather, the ICE may fire up to assist with heating the cabin. Thirdly, there will be an EV Hold Mode which will allow a driver to conserve their battery for use at a later time. For instance, if you have a highway trip initially followed up with a drive through the city. You can engage this mode which will use fire up the ICE right away and provide power to the motor(s) immediately and conserve the battery for when you get to the city portion of your trip.
          montoym
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dean Hammond
          You really need to read up on the Volt. It does not need to be plugged in either, hence why it has an ICE. Also, don't confuse the Energi and the C-Max Hybrid here. Both are talked about in this story, but they are two different vehicles. The 47mpg figure is for the Hybrid, not the plug-in Energi. We don't yet know how the Energi's range-extended mode will compare to the Volts or the Prius plug-in's yet. Secondly, $40K on a paperweight? what of that? The Volt can be used for 100% of the driving a person does, short distance commutes or long distance hauls. I question the long distance comment you brought up because it's a red herring. Yes, the Volt can travel long distance and do so while providing good mileage (stellar mileage, no, but still 40mpg and better than a lot of other options). It's a red herring becuase if a person is focused on the long-distance driving characterisitcs of a vehicle, why are they looking at a plug-in to begin with? Long distance hauls are not what they are designed for. They can do it, to be sure, but their focus is on commuting which is what the vast majority of us use our vehicles for on a daily basis. The percentage of people who reguallry take trips of more than a few hundred miles is in the single digits or low teens, it's largely inconsequential for the majority of drivers who spend a lot of their time and mileage on their daily commute.
          montoym
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dean Hammond
          Again, focus. You are using the C-Max Hybrid's 47mpg figure and applying it to the Energi. Once again, they are two different vehicles. We do not yet know what the range extended figures for the Energi will be. When we have those, let's get together again and compar figures. Untill then, it's all conjecture. Secondly, I'm using the EPA figures for all of my comparisons here. The EPA states that the Volt achieves 40mpg hwy and the highway mileage is what youa re crowing about. If you have an issue with that, take it up with the EPA, not me. As far as your 70+mile daily commute, yes, you are well outside the majority. There are at least a couple of studies that show that the average American drives less than 40miles each day. You are nearly double that and well outside the bell curve. Therefore, you aren't really the ideal candidate for a plug-in at all. No biggie, tons of other people are.
          Dean Hammond
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dean Hammond
          montoym...perhaps you havent read the volts true HIGHWAY MPGS....they are somewhat lacking in comparison, so whats best? 10 miles more pure EV with substandard highway mpgs or....fact is after 38 or so EV miles the ICU kicks in correct ?, so from that point on the vehicle is basically gas powered and MPGS are significant ........so heres my question, which is better, one that after Electric gets approx 37 mpgs or one 7-10 more...choices choices....tests to come I suppose. So, to say they are purely designed for short commutes is IMO flawed logic.......
          montoym
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dean Hammond
          @ Jason: Wrong on both counts. I do respect the Volt because of what it has achieved when so many doubted it. It's a pretty damn good first effort and will only get better with time. I do not currently, nor have I ever owned a GM product. I currently own a Jeep and a VW and I've had a Ford and another VW in the past. I did use an old Chevy pickup as my primary vehicle when I first got my license, but it was my Dad's old one and I never owned it (though I am considering buying it from him for a project vehicle). Satisfied? As far as competition, I relish it, I agree wholeheartedly that it makes all cars better. What I don't like is misrepresentation of the facts or twisting the facts to attempt to prove something that isn't factual or is largely meaningless. It's that that I will defend all the time, regardless of what vehicle it's directed at.
          Dean Hammond
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dean Hammond
          once again montoym, irrespective if you use 40 or 37 combined, its either 8mpgs inferior or 10, and 8 -10 k more, what exactly dont you get?.....
          Dean Hammond
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dean Hammond
          designed for short commutes?....bottome line , in the Volt after 38 miles or so, THIS is what you get........Once the battery is depleted and the small, four-cylinder gasoline engine kicks in, the Chevrolet Volt gets a second, distinct EPA rating of 37 mpg. That's good, but it's in line with other cars with small, four-cylinder engines.........case closed, maybe they will bump it a tad for 2013, but they just got leapfrogged. And I dont know about anyone else here, but my daily commute is almost double 38 miles....
          montoym
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dean Hammond
          quote - "apologies, Im talking COMBINED mileage....which after 38 miles is what to expect....its 37 on the volt." - If you're going to apologize, then please be complete. You talk about how the Volt can't do 3-400mile trips as well as other options, but then you want to use the combined mileage figure of the Volt and not the highway figure? What 3-400mile trip are you going on that you aren't on the highway for? As I stated before, and you can't bring tyourself to agree with despite clear evidence of, is that the Volt is rated at 40mpg highway. How come any other vehcile that's rated at 40mpg highway is seen as fantastic, but for the Volt, eh it's only mediocre? As far as the Energi, without any figures from Ford, I'm not going to try to put words in their mouth. I'm simply going off of what we see here If the figures were going to be the same, then why wouldn't Ford have made mention of that in their press release? Wouldn't you think they'd want to rave about those figures? They'd have reason to do so. All that said, regardless of the extended range mileage of the Energi (or the Prius plug-in for that matter), the Volt drivers will continue to go their merry way achieving 1000+mi per 9.3gal. tank of gasoline regardless of that the EPA says they should expect. Remember again that the majority of driving that people do is in short stints (commuting and getting through daily life), not taking long 3-400 mile trips. http://www.voltstats.net/ - check the "Monthly Totals" tab for all the important info Here are some recent figures though: July 2012 (1413 vehicles included) Total MPVDD (Total Miles per Vehicle Driven Daily) - 42.86 EV MPVDD (EV Miles per Vehicle Driven Daily) - 31.39 EV percentage - 73% MPG - 130.77 (includes all miles driven, not just CS miles) MPGe - 64.55 (the best figure to compare against other plug-ins since it includes the EV and CS modes) MPGcs (MPG in CS mode) - 35.35 With 73% of the driving being done in EV mode, the CS mileage figure doesn't mean a great deal. Is it better to have a higher number? Certainly, but when you may only be driving a few hundred miles a month using the gas engine, it's not going to greatly increase your fuel costs by achieving 35-40mpg in CS mode as opposed to 45-50. I'd also love to see a similar breakdown of figures like this for the Prius Plug-in and Energi as well using a simialrly large test sample. I virtually guarantee that the Volt would post better numbers in all the categories except MPGcs. Until that day comes though, we only have the data in front of us to go off of.
          Dean Hammond
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dean Hammond
          montoym...what exactly makes you think the Energis numbers will differ, its ONLY difference is its ability ( due to its batteries ) to charge to full capacity whilst parked and plugged in, and longer pure EV range, everything else drivetyrain wise is ver-batum.....and would you like a copy of a Chevy Volt window sticker with the number less than 40 on it?....
          Dean Hammond
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dean Hammond
          axiomatic, read the post.....montoym was expressing they were just for casual round town driving...NOW do you get it, if THAT was the case the Focus electric trumps the Volt, if its combined, which is what i HAVE been saying it gets trumped by the C-max....with me now?
          Dean Hammond
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dean Hammond
          axiomatic...the Govt incentives havent been released for the Energi yet and because its based on battery size its likely the rebates etc will be larger than the regular C-max....sheesh!
          Dean Hammond
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dean Hammond
          if you want to spout pure EV numbers then you should include the Focus EV which at 76 miles on pure electric DOUBLES the Volts, is basically the same number and is apparently Great for the short commute driver you love touting.....so what exactly IS the Volt good for....one thing, a short handed compromise....
          Dean Hammond
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dean Hammond
          apologies, Im talking COMBINED mileage....which after 38 miles is what to expect....its 37 on the volt.
      ishmaelcrowley
      • 3 Years Ago
      I have to admit Ford has great PR. If the cars were as good as the PR the sales would be up not down. The new Escape and the Fiesta models critical to Fords success are having problems. Let's hope the C Max lives up to the PR.
      nsxrules
      • 3 Years Ago
      Will be interesting to see if it can beat the Prius V in real life MPG. The Fusion hybrid was rated higher than the previous gen Camry hybrid but got worse mileage in the real world and in magazine tests.
        Dean Hammond
        • 3 Years Ago
        @nsxrules
        thats the previous iteration, the Camry was updated, fords update is coming....
          nsxrules
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dean Hammond
          It was the previous version of both cars. The Fusion hybrid was rated higher but in real world situations and magazine tests it got worse gas mileage.
          suthrn2nr
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dean Hammond
          yea, i remember that too, ford said it could go in pure EV mode up to 50mph and got 50mpg, but its real world MPG was not any better than the Camry hybrid. Motor trend wrote an article about it, basically the Fusion had really tall gears and EV mode only worked if acceleration was turtle-like. Ford was gaming the EPA test to get better MPG ratings. I hope the CMAX has more substance than the Fusion. Also, I like the Fusion and Fusion hybrid, but the truth is its MPG was a little inflated.
        mysterie
        • 3 Years Ago
        @nsxrules
        Lol, don't know how they got those numbers, driving slightly badly I meet the rated MPG number. Driving at 60 MPH most of the time has netted me an avg of 42 to 45 MPG/ Currently at 40,000 miles and counting.
        A P
        • 3 Years Ago
        @nsxrules
        The "real world" has NOTHING to do with magazine tests. That is the problem.......people on here take as gospel what auto writers (writers that have their own and advertising agendas) say and report. WAKE up and understand that 90% of what is written on AB is dictated by advertising dollars. The other 10% is a mix of auto enthusiast dogma with about one % actual critical writing.
      Myself
      • 3 Years Ago
      It looks like manufacturers are trying to reinvent the wheel... By which I mean standard developed and established by Prius. Love it or loath it, it's the most successful hybrid, it's been a commercial hit, it DID set the benchmark and it's high. From reading this I conclude that the C-max behaves just as Prius does... The only difference is semantics. Having said that... I suspect the engine ecu is tweaked to beat Prius numbers.
        Rollingdoughnut
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Myself
        So lets compare the Prius and CMax plug in hybrids. The CMax goes 85mph before the gas engine kicks on, compared to 62 for the Prius. So the Prius will use the gas engine as soon as you get on the interstate. The CMax has a 20 mile all electric range, and the Prius 13. So it will go farther on all electric power. The Cmax is bigger in every dimension both outside and inside. The Prius gets 50mpg vs 47mpg overall for the CMax. And the Cmax is less expensive. Sounds like the CMax wins. This is what's called progress. The Prius will now have to improve in it's next generation to beat the CMax that's out now.
      PICKLEBOY
      • 3 Years Ago
      is it just more or does the body style look eerily like a Hyundai Elantra?
        Synthono
        • 3 Years Ago
        @PICKLEBOY
        Since the Hyundai Elantra isn't a tall wagon, I must conclude you are from the mirror universe.
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