Tesla Model S
  • Tesla Model S
  • Tesla Model S

  • tesla model s
  • tesla model s

  • Tesla Model S
  • Tesla Model S

  • Tesla Model S
  • Tesla Model S

  • Tesla Model S
  • Tesla Model S

  • Tesla Model S
  • Tesla Model S

  • Tesla Model S
  • Tesla Model S

  • Tesla Model S
  • Tesla Model S

  • Tesla Model S
  • Tesla Model S

  • Image Credit: Tesla Motors
  • Image Credit: Tesla Motors
  • Image Credit: Tesla Motors
  • Image Credit: Tesla Motors
  • Image Credit: Tesla Motors
Sure, the long-term numbers are bigger – 5,000 produced by the end of the year, 20,000 (or maybe even 30,000) in 2013 – but the immediate digits that define the Tesla Model S are quite manageable. Specifically, as of Friday, Tesla has built 50 of the luxury electric vehicles, 29 for retail customers and 21 that are destined for Tesla stores.

In the next few weeks, Tesla plans to build 50 more and the pace will increase as needed after that until the automaker hits the aforementioned target numbers, Bloomberg reports. What's perhaps most interesting is that the first 50 vehicles have already been driven more than 39,000 miles, writes George Blankenship, Tesla's vice president of worldwide sales and ownership experience, which is an average of 780 miles per vehicle. Most of those miles were put on at the Get Amped Model S tour, which is out and about introducing the car to potential buyers. The plan for that road show is 5,000 test drives in 45 days. As always, Tesla is thinking big.

Still, as of today, you could park every Model S that exists in a moderately sized restaurant parking lot. It won't be long, and this will not be the case.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 92 Comments
      • 3 Months Ago
      @bluepongo1 I corrected your inaccuracies at the "Bloomberg post".
      SVX pearlie
      • 2 Years Ago
      @Sebastian: Please correct the title, as it is both inaccurate and misleading. According to Tesla: " we have 29 that are either already in the hands of their new owners or on their way " That is *not* remotely the same as 29 "delivered". "Delivered" means that the Customer has taken possession of the vehicle, and that has not happened, not even by Tesla's own admission. The accurate part is "50 built", which Tesla confirms as having been produced. It's like saying that GM has "delivered" a zillion more full-size pickups than actually sold, which just happen to be sitting on Dealer lots, waiting for Customers to (eventually) take possession of them (over the next 6 months, as they have something like 180 days inventory of the damn things!).
        paulwesterberg
        • 2 Years Ago
        @SVX pearlie
        This is similar to how GM reports vehicles that have been reserved with a down payment but have not yet left the dealership. The good news for Tesla is that they don't have to have a lot of capital tied up in vehicles that have been produced but not yet sold.
          Rotation
          • 3 Months Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          Where did you hear this? If the car is not paid for and title transfer applied for, the car is not sold. I'd be shocked if GM or anyone got away with calling cars that were not sold sold.
          SVX pearlie
          • 3 Months Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          No, it's not, because GM doesn't count it as delivered, merely produced.
        Ryan
        • 2 Years Ago
        @SVX pearlie
        It sounds like they are going to be 'delivered' soon enough. The cars are on their way to be sold to people who are waiting in line to buy them...
          SVX pearlie
          • 3 Months Ago
          @Ryan
          "According to Tesla: " we have 29 that are either already in the hands of their new owners or on their way "" That is obfuscation. Either they're delivered, or not. There is no "on their way" in the auto industry.
          PR
          • 3 Months Ago
          @Ryan
          SVX When did this become Tesla "deliberately obfuscating things"???? They didn't write the vague story title, ABG did. Here is what Tesla said, and they aren't obfuscating anything: "we have 29 that are either already in the hands of their new owners or on their way via Tesla Personal Delivery." It is just that 20 words is way too much to include in a story title than the 2 words ABG used instead. And this isn't SEC papers, this is just a blog entry. http://www.teslamotors.com/blog/inside-tesla-080212
          Tim W.
          • 3 Months Ago
          @Ryan
          Given that Tesla has on-site delivery for their vehicles, "on their way" likely means that they are en-route to the customer's house or place of business, likely in a state other than CA.
          SVX pearlie
          • 3 Months Ago
          @Ryan
          So naive. What is "soon enough"? A couple days? A couple weeks? What? If the Customer holds the keys, it's very simple. Telsa is deliberately obfuscating things by not giving a straight definition. Why you give that kind of behavior a pass is hard to understand. You wouldn't accept it of another OEM, and you wouldn't accept it if you were an accountant or working for the SEC.
          SVX pearlie
          • 3 Months Ago
          @Ryan
          That's what Telsa would like you to infer. But that's not what they said, or they would have said this: " we have 29 that are either already in the hands of their new owners or will be by August 13th." or better yet: " we have 10 in the hands of their new owners, and another 19 which were loaded onto transporters for delivery later this week." Simple, precise, and to the point. No wiggle room, no confusion. Straight Talk, and completely verifiable.
        SVX pearlie
        • 3 Months Ago
        @SVX pearlie
        Nissan took $100 deposits on 10,000 Leaf pre-sale, but they didn't get to count 10,000+ Leaf "delivered" prior to Dec. 2010. If it's not delivered into the possession of the Customer, it's not "delivered", simple as that.
          PR
          • 3 Months Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          So now you are comparing a $99 dollar deposit on cars that hadn't been built, to cars that have been built and are on trucks for Tesla Personal Delivery? This is even worse than your last comparison. While you are technically correct about the title not being 100% correct, your examples are leading you further and further away from your central argument. Everyone here can clearly see the vast difference between cars out for delivery, and a deposit on a car that hasn't even gone into production yet. It seems like you are trying to argue that ABG missed a subtle technical difference between "units delivered" and "units out for delivery". I can see that point. But instead your examples are vastly different than what is actually happening with Tesla, so you are undercutting your point. *shrug*
          SVX pearlie
          • 3 Months Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          No, it's deliberately vague, and there is no way to know what's going on. It's impossible to say, and Tesla did that on purpose. By their statements, they introduce a lot of doubt. At this point, all we know are the following: * 10 cars have been delivered, * 21 cars are for demo * up to 19 have passed through the line, and are allocated for Customers. There is no detail as to what "Telsa Personal Delivery" means, whether they're on trucks and arriving tomorrow (extremely unlikely), or whether they're sitting in a factory paddock, waiting for some kind paperwork or lottery or whatever. The notion that my guess is any worse than yours is pure bullsh!t. But the idea that they'll be in customer hands by the end of the week is almost certain to be false. Otherwise, Tesla would have put a date down. Or simply waited a week to announce the actual deliveries completed.
          PR
          • 3 Months Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          SVX "ON THEIR WAY VIA TESLA PERSONAL DELIVERY" means exactly what it says. (Shouted because you have a hearing problem). These units are on route from the factory to be personally delivered where ever the new owner wants their Model S delivered. It is funny that you are calling the person who said this is full of bullsh!t. When exactly do you think George Blankenship suddenly became full of bullsh!t? Was is when he was an executive at the Gap, and was responsible for blowing the doors open on 250 new stores per year? Heck, someone blowing open 250 new stores a year must be just talking out their @ss if they claim they can deliver 29 cars to customers via a well-know Tesla home delivery program, right? Or was it when he was an executive at Apple, when he was in charge of one of the most successful, brand-bolstering retail growth plans in history? When he took his "Smart Growth HitList" approach to international markets, and he was in charge of spreading Apple’s influence across Asia, Europe and North America? Is that when you began to suspect he couldn't possibly be able to successfully deliver 29 Tesla's without having to resort to bullsh!t? I guess we have no choice but to accept you must be right that this very successful person is full of bullsh1t, because you say so, even though you do not have a single shred of evidence to back up your accusation. So I can either take the word of a man who is actually in the position to know what he is talking about, and has a record of decades of global success at Apple and Gap to back him up, or I can believe you. A self-admitted Tesla Hater without a single shred of evidence to back you claim that Blankenship is bullsh1ting us. Obviously Diddy and your buddies would take the only logical choice and go with you..... *face palm*
          SVX pearlie
          • 3 Months Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          Wow, moron. He didn't give you his "word" on anything, otherwise, we'd know when the cars will be delivered. Nowhere did he say they were on a truck. Nowhere did he say when the cars would be delivered. There is no detail, no specific. There's no end date. You're just reading things into the statement what Tesla wants you to read, but isn't saying. That's bullsh!t. And as for Gap, they've been struggling lately. Not sure how much of that might be laid at his feet due to overexpansion. Until Tesla gives actual ship dates, delivery dates, "on their way" simply means they're sitting in a paddock outside the Tesla factory.
          SVX pearlie
          • 3 Months Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          OK, exactly *when* will those cars be delivered? I've driven cross country. I know how long it takes. If they were on trucks they would be in customer hands this time next week. But that's not what Tesla stated, is it. There is no timeframe, nothing. For all we know, they are sitting in the parking lot. If you've got delivery dates, then that's real. Otherwise it's big load of Tesla bullsh!t that you're swallowing and spitting out for the rest of us.
          PR
          • 3 Months Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          SVX No need to bullsh!t, we've got a direct quote from the very executive who is personally responsible for these deliveries: "we have 29 that are either already in the hands of their new owners or ON THEIR WAY via Tesla Personal Delivery." (emphasis added) And here is the exact same executive explaining Tesla Personal Delivery: "I am very pleased to introduce "Tesla Personal Delivery." We will deliver your car wherever you like: your home, your office, your friend’s house, your hotel on vacation, or anywhere else that makes you smile." http://www.teslamotors.com/blog/its-time-build-your-model-s What isn't clear about this? It is interesting. You started this demanding that AGB's limited length story title be absolutely 100% clear, and here you are with all the space you could ever want, and you are choosing to spread FUD yourself.
        SVX pearlie
        • 3 Months Ago
        @SVX pearlie
        lotta b!tches and EVtards downvoting here, because they don't have a clue about how the auto industry works, or what the industry norms are. As a public company, Tesla should be held to the same reporting standards as other OEMs, simple as that. Tesla is doing things that don't conform to the auto business. They don't release monthly sales or production data, and what they do release is both vague and muddled. This lack of transparency is unfortunate and reeks of something shady happening behind the scenes. To give Tesla a pass is just stupid business, and visible evidence of typical EVtard circle-jerking. When you kids are ready to grow up and accept business reality, then EV companies can be taken seriously.
          Daddy
          • 3 Months Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          SVX - You and I have a lot in common: you sound like you actually worked in the auto industry and we both are sick off the fanboys cheering on a company without a clue of how the industry really works.
          PR
          • 3 Months Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          What the heck? When did a vague story title written by ABG become justification to bash Tesla? Tesla didn't write the ABG story, Sebastian did.
          mycommentemail
          • 3 Months Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          Daddy, Sorry you are so personally invested in this story that it is making you sick. Might consider going outside or something. You know... fresh air 'n stuff.
          SVX pearlie
          • 3 Months Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          My only bone to pick is Seb's title. The rest is picking at Tesla for bullsh!tting around.
          PR
          • 3 Months Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          Daddy -- It sure sucks to have whatever loser automobile company you sold your soul to get their @ss whupped by a startup company, doesn't it?
        Rob Mahrt
        • 3 Months Ago
        @SVX pearlie
        If I sold you something on eBay, and I sent it to you, and someone asked about the status of that item, I would say it was "delivered", I don't see how this statement is that egregious.
        PR
        • 2 Years Ago
        @SVX pearlie
        SVX -- The title might be a bit misleading. But it is even more misleading to comparing cars sitting on dealer's lots waiting for a buyer, to Tesla's that have already left the factory and on their way to customers via Tesla Personal Delivery. Tesla Personal Delivery doesn't even go through a third-party like an independent dealership, so you are comparing two completely different business models. The concept of "days of inventory" doesn't even apply, since there are no dealers with any inventory for any number of days, because there are no dealerships involved. Your comparison is apples to oranges. I don't have a problem with the slight technical difference between cars that have been delivered and cars that have left the factory and are out for delivery for the purpose of keeping a headline short. These are folks who have been on the list since the beginning, paid a $40K deposit, and have already finalized their orders. The fact that some buyers may live a bit further away and takes longer to deliver than other buyers doesn't seem like a big deal to me.
          SVX pearlie
          • 3 Months Ago
          @PR
          Either the car has been delivered into Customer possession, or not, simple as that. There's no need for fakery or splitting hairs between a dealer network or whatever the hell Tesla's doing. If it's left the factory, but not yet in customer hands, then it's still in distribution. And it's not yet delivered.
      bluepongo1
      • 2 Years Ago
      Don't down vote me I might cry. I guess the gas trolls live in the past before: Space X, Pay Pal, DOE loan that Tesla never needed, PEAK OIL production, GM gutted( r.i.p.: Saturn, Pontiac and Olds) and wars for oil. I might pour a quart of 10-40 out for those homies if they didn't regress to pettiness in the comments. Tesla doesn't need to appease dinosaurs and their failed business models; I down voted the ones who live in the past and root for the failure of the future of America.
        Rotation
        • 3 Months Ago
        @bluepongo1
        DoE loan Tesla never needed? That's nonsense. While the DoE loan is structured in a strange way that makes spending the money difficult, having those cash reserves makes raising additional cash a lot easier. And Tesla so far has needed all the cash they can get to pull off their difficult undertaking. Tesla definitely needed and took good advantage of the DoE loans.
        oktrader
        • 3 Months Ago
        @bluepongo1
        pongo: The extremes of logical overreach in this comment are such that one would be best off to avoid it altogether, just as one politely tiptoes around the sidewalk prophet. How does one rationally address a passionate man warning of an angry diety's impending wrath? Probably the same way one approaches his implication that 50 hand-made luxury sport sedans will prevent wars: avoid eye contact and move on. But sometimes I simply must address factual misstatements. In this case it's obvious: the "DoE loan that Tesla never needed". That's quite obviously incorrect. The company has amassed $865M of operating and laid in over $400m in PP&E capital, with more to come. They could not possibly have remained liquid without the $465M loan. Right up until the final drawdown, it has continued to be an anchor of the business proposition laid out to shareholders every quarter. Had they not undertaken the S Model, you would be right. I know: without the S, how would we have entered a new era of peace? I'm sorry for making you angry by repeating the contents of Tesla's own documents -- records that public companies are required to publish. It's clear that you think my statement of financial facts gives you insight into my technical acumen, my politics --- dare I say my religion? My you ARE a prophet! Well, peace be unto you; I didn't "downvote" you.
          bluepongo1
          • 3 Months Ago
          @oktrader
          Logical overreach ? Where do you get religion and prophet from in that paragraph ? Most likely you are projecting your own insecurity. Good luck with the lack of new tech patents.
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Months Ago
          @oktrader
          @ oktrader "just as one politely tiptoes around the sidewalk prophet. How does one rationally address a passionate man warning of an angry diety's impending wrath? Probably the same way one approaches his implication that 50 hand-made luxury sport sedans will prevent wars: avoid eye contact and move on." ROFL ! That's some turn of phrase ! What a pleasure to read such an elegantly descriptive rebuke, yet employ's no invective. It's rare I vote (never down) but , definitely + for such prose.
          bluepongo1
          • 3 Months Ago
          @oktrader
          Oh I re-read the comments and found you lack comprehension. Trolls gonna troll. Diety's impending wrath WTF ? *for oil* Tesla has new tech patents and never had to go public. Space X just got how much ? BTW religion, politics, and sports are irrelevant diversions to keep you distracted with foregone conclusions while your pockets are picked. You never angered me, you weren't even interesting enough to make me sad. I guess sarcasim needs an emoticon ;)
        • 3 Months Ago
        @bluepongo1
        @bluepongo1 "DOE loan that Tesla never needed" It raises the simple question: If Tesla never needed the loan, then why they applied for it and even more importantly why DOE gave it to them? Can you answer this simple question bluepongo1?
      bluepongo1
      • 3 Months Ago
      I saw your Bloomberg post, they got simple things wrong. The S starts at $ 60,000, they have a waiting list, and for more batterys they haven't even tapped Aptera Australia.
      Marco Polo
      • 2 Years Ago
      Good grief what a lot of fuss from 42 posters so far ! Sebastian Blanco's article is a good, positive 'opinion' piece for an experienced journalist. It doesn't pretend to be unbiased or analytical. It is,was it is, an optimistic update on the progress of the model S. Tesla and it's remarkable CEO, Elon Musk have every right to bask in the 'Honeymoon' period of the release of a very good vehicle, many pundits said would never occur. Tesla Motors is the first new US auto-manufacturer for 67 years ! The achievement, is astonishing. Even if Tesla went bankrupt today, the achievement would remain historically important. But, so far as I know, Elon Musk is not a candidate for beatification ! He's a businessman, perhaps a bit more visionary, but still a businessman running a business listed on the stock exchange ! The viability and future of Tesla is a legitimate subject for criticism. Can Tesla really build and sell, 30,000 of the nearly $100,000 model S over the next two years ? Only the future can tell. The shareholders may desert the stock , Tesla may over extend with new models, Elon Musk may die, or sell Tesla to an OEM, OTOH, Tesla may continue to prosper. One thing we can be sure of, right now, is that 50 of these amazingly radical, (and beautiful) vehicles exist, and are on their way to customers and showrooms. I say, let Tesla, Elon Musk, and his team, enjoy their moment in the Sun, and join them in celebrating the birth of the model S.
        bluepongo1
        • 3 Months Ago
        @Marco Polo
        I think you aren't the first to confuse the roadster ($ 100,000) price point with the S ($ 60,000). I think if the gov. allows Best Buy to go private that won't be off the table for Tesla either.
          bluepongo1
          • 3 Months Ago
          @bluepongo1
          Back for the last time, I'm commenting on my brothers computer. Krisztiant I guess Google lied - I'm holding out for the X-TYPE any way. Thanks !
          • 3 Months Ago
          @bluepongo1
          Dear bluepongo1 Bloomberg: "The first 10 “Signature” performance versions are to be picked up by their owners at Tesla’s Fremont, California, factory. They’re priced at $95,400 to $105,400..." I you take the effort and follow the link, I provided below [Tesla's website], you can easily realize, that the Tesla Model S Signature Performance version base price is showcased at $97,900 (which is even more than the article's min. $95,400) but what you can easily upgrade to $105,400 with some fine extras. http://www.teslamotors.com/models/options/ Time to calm down and take a break bluepongo1
        • 3 Months Ago
        @Marco Polo
        Marco, This story has more depth than only a random issue about the Tesla Model S: Bloomberg - Tesla Ships First $100,000 Model S Amid Uncertain Demand" “In the end, this isn’t about Tesla or Model S; it’s about battery-electric vehicles themselves,” said Eric Noble, president of the Car Lab, an industry consultant in Orange, California. While “Model S is beautiful,” he said, “proof of the very limited potential of battery electrics already exists in the market itself.” The Bloomberg article can be called a comprehensive / unbiased analysis - quoting every sides' point of views as well - about the topic, which can be read here: http://mobile.bloomberg.com/news/2012-06-21/tesla-delivers-first-100-000-cars-amid-uncertain-demand.html
          • 3 Months Ago
          Marco, Bloomberg fairly celebrated the moment as well: "In delivering a car designed and built entirely in-house, Musk will achieve something that has eluded most American entrepreneurs since Henry Ford... It’s impressive that Tesla has made it into production.." But Bloomberg - as it describes itself -  is a premier site for business and financial market news. And the "...shareholders at the meeting [questioning Musk himself] raised concerns about the volume goal [of Tesla]..." etc. The shareholders from their business point of view have to see the situation realistically and not enthusiastically, at least, if they want to invest successfully and presumably they do. Apart from this: Long live Elon & Tesla (but this doesn't change any outcome).
          Marcopolo
          • 3 Months Ago
          krisztiant Maybe so, but this is their moment in the sun ! There is plenty of time later for reflection and analysis. It would be churlish to raise such issues, right now . No matter what eventuates, this moment should be celebrated in respect of all the hard work and diligengence by Elon and his team !
      Giza Plateau
      • 2 Years Ago
      The stock price rose rather dramatically after this half truth from Blankenship. The stock market really want it to succeed no matter how bad the numbers look.
      Maddoxx
      • 2 Years Ago
      Only 50 have been produced so far? They got a lot of work to do... Looks like they need to hire more workers.
        Rob Mahrt
        • 3 Months Ago
        @Maddoxx
        Check the website, many many jobs listed, a few months ago there were only 20-30, they are hiring because they will be ramping up production, this is how it works. Get the process figured out, then bring in more people to train and produce.
      JakeY
      • 3 Months Ago
      Tesla didn't "need' the loan (as in it wasn't necessary for their survival, while the Daimler funds were because it allowed them to issue the IPO and get the DoE loans in the first place). But they might not be able to make the Model S on schedule without it and would be fundraising instead. Fundraising is not an impossible option (just look at Fisker or even Coda), it just might take longer. On the other hand, LTAW makes a good point. The environmental impact study required by the DOE loan delayed the Model S by about half a year to evaluate the San Jose site. Then Tesla was forced to moved from the San Jose site since it was a greenfield and the loan program favored brownfield sites (like the former NUMMI factory). So it's actually pretty hard to tell whether they would be on schedule or not without the loan, but all that is in the past right now. The fact of the matter is, they successfully got the loan and it has helped them built the factory. The terms of private capital is definitely not as good as a low interest government loan (despite possible delays from having to go through the application process and the risk of failing to get an approval, which might kill the company by making them miss opportunities to take private capital, like it did with Carbon Motors). Overall I say the DOE loan was a positive for Tesla, but there's definitely negatives to the loan too.
      Daddy
      • 2 Years Ago
      Is Tesla a sham or what?? So Elon is saying that Tesla will produce 5,000 cars by the end of the year. The Model S was launched on June 22, 2012, so that leaves 6 months until the end of the year. In order to meet the 5,000 vehicle promise, Tesla has to build 833 cars per month (5,000 / 6 months = 833 cars/month) . In the last 6 weeks since they launched, they only built 50?!?!? Really? At run at rate, they should have built at least 1,200 by now. Anyone not shorting TSLA is leaving money on the table.
        SVX pearlie
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Daddy
        Indeed, Tesla is more of a sham than Nissan. Both of them making outrageous production and sales claims not backed up by reality, or plausbility. As for production, you are considerably off base with your 833 /month figure. It is Aug. 6, and Telsa claims they will build 50 more in the next few weeks, so that'll be 100 total by Sep 1, leaving 4 months to build the remaining 4900 cars. So starting Sep 1, Tesla should suddenly, magically jump from producing less than 50 per month up to well over 1,200 cars per month. That is a mere +2,300% increase in production.
          SVX pearlie
          • 3 Months Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          I have an axe to grind with any company that isn't transparent and makes claims that cannot be verified, or subjected to third party scrutiny.
          PR
          • 3 Months Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          Yup, me too.
          PR
          • 3 Months Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          Hmmm.... Let's do some quick math. Tesla is planning on building 20,000 Model S cars in 2013. That is 1,667 cars per month. So we know that Tesla is planning on ramping up to 1,667 cars/month and they have a plan to make it happen. 1,667 in Dec 1,667 in Nov 1,667 in Oct --------------- 5,000 units in these months alone in just 3 months. Tesla has already increased production by around 1000% percent over last month. As long as they finish their ramp-up to their planned capacity by November, they should be absolutely fine.
          oktrader
          • 3 Months Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          JakeY: Fisker did not enter a factory environment with unproven processes, new machines, and no other products to help absorb overheads. Valmet built these cars, and the core manufacturing equipment and personnel were far more prepared to undertake the work. Moreover Fisker (and Valmet)outsourced considerably more content to suppliers who were able to undertake higher rates much sooner. Don't estimate the possibility of Tesla's operational success on Fisker. (BTW: there were no "DoE cuts". Fisker's DoE loans were for the Nina, not the Karma, and they were halted because Fisker had failed to meet some key progress milestones. The layoffs were in Delaware, not Finland where Valmet produced the Karma.)
          JakeY
          • 3 Months Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          You seem to have an axe to grind with both Nissan and Tesla. You and Daddy like to claim somehow you guys have a grasp of how the auto industry works and that no one else here does, but are somehow are completely unaware of the typical ramp-up production rate of new cars. Example is the Karma: In July 2011, they were making 5/week (20/month). http://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/new-cars/fisker-karma-gets-3000-orders In November 2011, they hit 150/week (600/month) or 30x in 4 months (despite delays). http://www.plugincars.com/fisker-karma-production-delayed-faulty-components-110283.html In Dec 2011, they were producing at 25/day (750/month), it seems they have stuck to this production rate as for Feb 2012 (probably because of the DOE cuts and they only had 3000 pre-orders). http://www.plugincars.com/fisker-karma-shipments-underway-1200-units-pipeline-111107.html http://green.autoblog.com/2012/02/07/fisker-lays-off-employees-halts-production-while-renegotiating/ With a similar ramp up rate to the Karma, the Model S looks like this: Aug 2012 ~50/month Dec 2012 1500/month (50*30) Jan 2013 1875/month (1500*750/600) Given PR's math of 1667/month at the max planned production of the Model S, it seems they can realistically hit that production rate before the end of the year, given the actual history of the Karma.
          JakeY
          • 3 Months Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          @oktrader Obviously the manufacturing situation for the Tesla is different than the Karma, but the production stats on the Karma is a very clear counterpoint to both you and Daddy's claim that the "industry" starts production at the optimal run rate. Such a strategy may make sense in production line that makes more than one car (that was the case for the Karma, but apparently they also "ramped up" their production, so what's the deal there?), but I doubt it makes sense for Tesla with new equipment and processes. It's highly unlikely their first few runs will have no issues, so it doesn't make sense to make 833/month or however many in the first go and have to go back and fix them, as they are doing with the smaller batches of cars they are making now.
          SVX pearlie
          • 3 Months Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          I eagerly await Tesla's 2012 production report, and we'll see where reality turns out.
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Daddy
        Yes, pull out right before they start making money. Excellent stock advice. Who is your employer, again?
        PR
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Daddy
        Diddy, It is called a ramp-up. Every manufacturer does it with a new model. It is normal and standard for the industry, and it was something that Tesla planned for. If you don't know this, and you are making stock market decisions based upon their ramp-up..... "Our Fremont factory ramp up is progressing very well. Our focus on quality has paid off as we moved from building three cars per week, to five cars per week, to ten cars per week....our plan is to double that number in the next two to three weeks. Production will then continue to escalate even more significantly every two to three weeks thereafter. " http://www.teslamotors.com/blog/inside-tesla-080212
          oktrader
          • 3 Months Ago
          @PR
          PR, the so-called "ramp-up" that Tesla is doing is frankly misguided and amateurish. Because you saw Volt deliveries to dealers, for example, rise from dozens a week to hundreds, it DOES NOT mean they were doing taking the path that Tesla is today. Auto manufacturers meticulously detail processes, designs, material and supplier specs, etc. well before a single chip is cut. They will build and calibrate precision jigs months before assemblies begin. They perform "3P" excercises over and over, designing cells, material and process flow, etc. to specific production cycle time and cost metrics. The first time the line is operated to build cars, cells are operated "at rate" in order to verify process metrics (and make fixes where required). Once actual production deliveries are planned, if they are to be in limited quantities (as the Volt was), they are run in mixed model lines. Volt shares a line with the DTS. But cars are always run at "X" minutes per vehicle from the very start (where "X" is the optimum rate). Does "X" improve over time? Sure. But not by orders of magnitude. What Tesla is doing is learn-as-you-go, making significant process and tooling alterations, part redesigns, sourcing changes, etc. while they undertake deliveries. This is an unsatisfactory methodology that is terribly expensive and destructive to quality. It's really going to hurt customer satisfaction and the bottom line. I can understand why the reassuring statement that you quoted from the Tesla blog sounds uplifting. I would offer something from Musk himself, in which he describes a production line on the cusp of delivering the S Model exactly as expected: "I mean we’re really down to very sort of small refinements at this point. I mean these are kind of nuance issues of fit and finish, and rattle, squeak, the final fine tuning of the stereo system and that kind of thing, it’s not major stuff... I want to be really attentive to the details" Sounds great, yes? This is from the May 9th Q1 Conference Call. He's been talking about being almost there, with only "nuances", for 3 months. It is not going to go well.
      bluepongo1
      • 3 Months Ago
      Intrusive, R&D thieving, micro-managing, gov. pickpockets bullied Tesla into their sphere of influence. Tesla wasn't the penny snatcher the gov. was. Research patents for more proof. Did anyone believe the lie that was widely reported about the roadster? Fisker and Lotus said it was based on the Lotus - check the patents and don't believe the internet.
      Smith Jim
      • 2 Years Ago
      Starting a company from scratch to mass produce automobiles is an EXTREMELY difficult task. Anyone who has anything but praise for Tesla is completely clueless.
        Daddy
        • 3 Months Ago
        @Smith Jim
        Smith Jim "Anyone who has anything but praise for Tesla is completely clueless." Or maybe the people that sound skeptical actually worked for a real auto company and understand how far-fetched some of Elon's claims really are.
        Rotation
        • 3 Months Ago
        @Smith Jim
        Why do I have to be clueless if I suggest Tesla won't make their 5,000 figure this year? It isn't a condemnation of the company, but merely an indication that I do understand how hard it is to get a car like this out at all. And I also know how much harder it is to catch up than it is to fall behind. I think Tesla will do well, but I also think they won't get their 5,000 done. But in the end it's better to get the cars right than to just dump them out to make an arbitrary schedule.
      • 2 Years Ago
      Is there any reason why no car magazine have been able to test the new model S? In particular to verify the range like CR did recently with the Ford Focus.
        Daddy
        • 3 Months Ago
        Eventually, real automotive journalist will get access to the Model S (without it only being a 10 minute ride) and we'll hear the real story.
        JakeY
        • 3 Months Ago
        Maybe you didn't look very hard, but Motor Trend got a 1.5 hour first drive (it was on their front cover). There were also a couple of other publications that go much longer than just a the 10 minutes short drives most journalists got (Dan Neil got a bit more than an hour, greencarreports got an hour). The reason for the short duration is they have a lot of publications requesting drives (including many non-automotive ones), they have 5000 customer test drives to go through, and at the current production rate, they really don't have the spare cars to give to auto mags for a couple day full review (where range will be tested). Plus they don't really need any more media attention to attract customers (they already have a long list). CR buys their own cars to review, and given there is a very long reservation list they are unlikely to get a car to review this year.
        PR
        • 3 Months Ago
        I would guess that the hatchet job Top Gear did on the Roadster has something to do with the very controlled access the traditional gas car press is getting. Fool me once, you can't get fooled again. But the first press test drives were back in June, so it isn't like no one from the press has been allowed to test them at all. Video below of a press test drive and interview with Elon: http://autos.yahoo.com/blogs/motoramic/tesla-model-first-drive-electric-sedan-change-world-195537679.html There are dozens and dozens of reviews from different press companies like this on-line.
          SVX pearlie
          • 3 Months Ago
          @PR
          AutoBlog did a hatchet job on GM's Cadillac ATS, but as that was the exeception. The overwhelming majority of reviewers were *very* positive about the ATS. If the Tesla S actually were good, then there would be no need to hide it from reviews like a B-movie going straight to video after the 2nd weekend.
          Grendal
          • 3 Months Ago
          @PR
          They've let plenty of journalists drive them around. Where's the hiding? Like the article says, they've only built 50 so far. A long term test will happen in the next couple months, I'd guess. Every review so far has been that the car is outstanding. The long term test should happen with a general production car when the line is at full stream - in a couple more months. Until then, they should continue to go to the customers that have been waiting for years for their car. But that's just my opinion.
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