Too often, discussions about how best for people to get around crowded urban environments turn into an argument, with cars pitted against bicycles, highways versus public transit and improving commute times challenging pedestrian safety. But not in Austin.

In this latest episode of Translogic, our sister publication looks at how the Texas capital has embraced multimodal transportation, choosing "all of the above" rather than picking any one idea on which to hang its transportation strategy. With as rapidly as the city and surrounding region has been growing – now boasting some 1.2 million residents – the need for forward-thinking transportation planning is acute.

From wide, pedestrian-friendly sidewalks to bike lanes, car sharing to public charging stations and light rail, Austin seemingly has it all. The city isn't sitting still, either, promoting such ideas as bike lockers in office buildings with shower facilities to encourage two-wheel commuting, and getting ready to launch a bike sharing program next year. Federal money to develop a high-speed bus system will further enhance Austin's transportation alternatives.

Scroll down to watch the full Translogic episode and see what they're doing to Keep Austin Weird... and green. TRANSLOGIC 108: Austin Transportation Infrastructure


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  • 24 Comments
      Lee F.
      • 2 Years Ago
      Anyone who actually lives in Austin knows that while we do have all of these things they are half baked ideas at most. Bike lanes are not plentiful enough (also not all bikers use them even when they are there), the highway system is much too small for the amount of traffic coming in and out of downtown, charging stations are there but can be hard to find and the light rail is a huge joke in terms of where it actually travels to. Also the buses just plain suck. The car sharing is great though. The ideas are there but there is still a ton of work to be done on a city that grew way too fast and had politicians that refused to do anything about it until recently.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      The Univers News
      • 2 Years Ago
      having very nice stuff on /http://www.fashinews.com/
      mybora99
      • 2 Years Ago
      So let me get this straight, there are places of work in Austin that provide showers so that sweaty bike riders can shower after they bike to work? Who the hell would want to shower at their job everyday?
        dneel001
        • 2 Years Ago
        @mybora99
        My guess: people who want to bike to work and not stink as a result. So instead of showering at home, you can simply bike to work and shower there before heading up to your office. Sounds like a good plan for cyclists to me.
      Geezerrants
      • 2 Years Ago
      Texas is highly OVERRATED!
        AnalogJesse
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Geezerrants
        Yeah, having one of the strongest, most independent economies in the United States really sucks. I hate the religious nutjobs here sometimes, but Texas knows what it's doing economically. If only they could get their public school system working correctly. Austin, specifically, is one of the greatest cities in the United States.
        xmailboxcancerx
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Geezerrants
        Meh, your loss.
      jdeli01
      • 2 Years Ago
      Keep Austin Weird
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        Daniel D
        • 2 Years Ago
        Funny thing that. A transportation business needing employees and needing them to work shiftwork and be available for work every day of the year. You would expect the wages bill to be quite high. Well you wouldn't Sonata but most people would.
          Eddie Ameti
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Daniel D
          Overpaid government workers? Impossible, right? I mean politicians would never buy votes by overpaying government employees.
      LBJ's Love Child
      • 2 Years Ago
      Austin: Traffic fatalities up 32% this. The streets are chaos. I-35 slows to eight lanes of gridlock as it crawls through town, spewing huge quantities of unburned hydro-carbons into the air, while the city spends $20,000,000 for one mile of trail along the river/lake. The bicycle mode-share is 1.5% (in a city where >20% of the population is attached in some way to THE University). All that multi-modal infrastructure is for show and tell only. You don't have to ask what the city leaders have been smoking... but they roll it in your tax dollars.
      flychinook
      • 2 Years Ago
      I didn't much enjoy living in TX (too hot for my tastes, and dear god do Texans ever love to brag about Texas). That being said, I thoroughly enjoyed visiting Austin every time I went there. Very nice city, lots to do, great food, great music scene. I never used the public transportation there, but as many bicyclists as I saw on any given day, this article is easy to believe.
      Basil Exposition
      • 2 Years Ago
      I visited Austin for a week last year. I don't get the hype. It's just your average mid-size city, nothing more.
      koshavorlon
      • 2 Years Ago
      I really dislike the aol in beaded videos. They automatically start playing which is annoying, I am unable to skip to any point in the video, and they randomly start displaying the spinning loading symbol right in the middle of my video. It stays there for the rest of the video even though the VIDEO IS PLAYING FINE.
      Alex Ellsworth
      • 2 Years Ago
      Austin's public transit dossier looks impressive on paper, but the "light rail" is all but useless. They just took some pre-existing freight train track, bought a few shiny new LRVs, and started a passenger service that runs once in a blue moon. It does nothing to lessen citizens' dependence on cars - in no way would you be able to give up your car and get around by light rail instead. For transit systems to work, they need to be tailored solutions that truly fit the needs of their communities - and that usually means clean sheet design. It may cost more initially but will pay off in the long run, whereas piddling about with BRT and repurposing freight train tracks is not going to accomplish anything. Pointless projects like this give light rail a bad name.
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