Through the first six months of the year, Americans purchased 61,214 diesel-powered vehicles, not including heavy-duty diesel pickup trucks, according to a study by HybridCars.com and Baum and Associates. That figure represents a 27.5-percent improvement over the previous year.

Not counting HD trucks, .8 percent of vehicles sold in the States are diesel cars; including pickups brings that number up to three percent. Some of the best sales performances are being turned in by Audi, Mercedes-Benz and Volkswagen, with the A3 TDI accounting for almost 65 percent of all A3 sales.

Hybrid sales are also up, according to the report, increasing by 63.5 percent over 2011's levels, and, with a slew of new models coming in the next few years, clean vehicle sales aren't likely to slow down any time soon. And we'll welcome them with open arms. See all the details in the press release below.
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U.S. Clean Diesel Auto Sales Increase 27.5 Percent During First Half of 2012

WASHINGTON, July 31, 2012 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ -- More Than 15 New Diesel Autos to be Introduced In U.S. Market

During the first six months of 2012 clean diesel automobile sales in the United States increased 27.5 percent, according to new sales information compiled by HybridCars.Com and Baum and Associates.

In the second quarter of 2012, U.S. sales of clean diesel autos increased 22.3 percent in June over June 2011, increased 14.4 percent in May, and increased 28.2 percent in April.

During the first six months of 2012, U.S. hybrid car sales increased 63.5 percent and the overall automobile market increased 14.9 percent, according to the new sales information.

Month (2012 v. 2011) Clean Diesel +/- Hybrids +/- Overall Market +/-June 2012 +22.3 +22.2 +113.5April 2012 +28.2 + 2.3 +39.6February 2012 +42.9 +13.8 +11.4Total Sold in 2012 61,214 217,701 7,248,893(source:HybridCars.Com and Baum and Associates)

Diesel Sales Show Steady Double-Digit Increases for Past Two Years

"The 27.5 percent increase reflects the emerging market for clean diesel automobiles in the United States," said Allen Schaeffer, the Executive Director of the Diesel Technology Forum. "While clean diesel auto and light truck sales total about three percent of the total U.S. passenger car market, the steady double-digit monthly sales increases show a definite trend of interest in diesels.

"Despite some volatility in the auto market, clean diesel auto sales have increased in 22 of the past 23 months with double-digit increases in 20 of those months. And diesel auto sales increased by more than 30 percent in 12 of these months.

"While this is significantly less than the 50 percent diesel sales rate in Europe, it does indicate that Americans are taking a renewed interest as more diesels are being introduced into the U.S. market.

"With more than 15 new clean diesel models designated for the U.S. in the next two years, I fully expect diesel sales to increase even more extensively in the near future," Schaeffer said.

Some Clean Diesel Models Show 50%+ Sales Increase

Schaeffer said some of the major highlights of the 2012 clean diesel auto sales include:

Sales of Audi TDI diesel models in June made up 64.8 percent of overall Audi A3 models and 37.1 percent of overall Audi Q7 sales.

Sales of Mercedes' BlueTEC diesel models in June were up 50.3 percent for the year compared to the same period last year.

Sales of Volkswagen's Passat TDI clean diesel accounted for 21 percent of the midsize sedan's sales in June.

(See a list of all the Clean Diesel Vehicles Currently Available in the U.S.)

Pike Research Predicts Strong Future Diesel Sales In U.S.

According to a recent Pike Research study, rising fuel prices and stronger fuel economy regulations will stimulate increasing demand for clean diesel vehicles in markets around the world (Green Fleet). Pike forecasts that sales of these clean diesel vehicles will increase from 9.1 million in 2012 to 12.1 million annually by 2018, with clean diesels representing 12.4 percent of all light-duty vehicle sales by the end of that period.

Pike also predicts that the growth of diesel light duty vehicles will be especially strong in North America, with annual sales expected to increase from 282,000 vehicles in 2012 to 928,000 by 2018.

New Federal Mileage Regulations Will Further Increase Diesel Car Sales

Schaeffer said with higher and fluctuating fuel prices, Americans are seeking more fuel efficient cars. In addition, he said the new federal fuel efficiency standards that will require a 54.5 mpg average by 2025 will also boost clean diesel auto sales, as diesel cars are 20 to 40 more fuel efficient than gasoline versions.

More Clean Diesel Autos Will Soon Be Available In U.S.

In addition to the recent addition of the 2012 Volkswagen Passat TDI diesel and 2012 Porsche Cayenne diesel, Schaeffer said a number of additional diesels will be available soon in the U.S. including:

Audi A6, A8 and Q5 TDI clean diesels will be available in 2013 and an A4 diesel version in 2014 or early as 2013.

BMW announced that the U.S. market will see a 2.0-liter four cylinder diesel and 3.0-liter inline six diesel engine in the next 12 months.

Chrysler will introduce its new Jeep Grand Cherokee Ecodiesel in 2014, along with a new version of the discontinued Dakota pickup that will include a diesel.

Ford will offer a new diesel Transit full-size commercial van in 2013.

General Motors will offer a Cadillac ATS diesel and a diesel version of the Chevrolet Cruze in 2013.

Mazda will become the first Asian car manufacturer to sell diesel cars in the U.S. when it introduces its SKYACTIV-D 2.2-liter clean diesel engine.

The Mercedes S350 BlueTEC marks the return of the diesel-powered Mercedes-Benz S-Class to the United States in 2012. Mercedes also plans to bring a diesel in the GLK and C-class for a total of eight diesel models by 2014.

The newly redesigned 2012 VW Beetle will once again feature a TDI diesel version.

Also, possible new U.S. diesels in the near future include:

Mini Cooper diesel

Volkswagen Tiguan TDI diesel

Mercedes A Class diesel

Kia Optima diesel

Jaguar Land Rover diesel

ABOUT THE DIESEL TECHNOLOGY FORUM

The Diesel Technology Forum is a non-profit national organization dedicated to raising awareness about the importance of diesel engines, fuel and technology. Forum members are leaders in clean diesel technology and represent the three key elements of the modern clean-diesel system: advanced engines, vehicles and equipment, cleaner diesel fuel and emissions-control systems. For more information visit www.dieselforum.org .


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 65 Comments
      Proghog
      • 2 Years Ago
      Give me a VW GTD or the new A3 TDI and I'll help the percentage go up some more.
      guyverfanboy
      • 2 Years Ago
      Yes, I welcome more diesels. That 53 mpg Mazda CX-5 2.2 diesel sure would be nice. :D
      Joe
      • 2 Years Ago
      "Mazda will become the first Asian car manufacturer to sell diesel cars in the U.S. when it introduces its SKYACTIV-D 2.2-liter clean diesel engine." I think this should say the first Asian car manufacturer to sell clean diesels. Mazda, Toyota, and Nissan at least sold them in the 1980's. No one bought them then either. You could even get an Escort diesel back then, and several mini-trucks with diesel.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Gregory
      • 2 Years Ago
      Why is diesel fuel more expensive than gasoline, especially when it is cheaper to make than 3 grades of gas, trains, buses, trucks, commercial marine vessels, generators etceteras and small %age of cars in the US burn diesel because it contains more energy (btu) per volume, more efficient, less loss due to evaporation, and safer to handle? One would think that diesel would always be cheaper than 3 grades of gasoline?
      nothin8135
      • 2 Years Ago
      The air that comes out of my BMW 350 twin turbo is cleaner than when it went in , no polution. 450 Ft Lbs of torque at low rpms and 28mpg city and 40mpg hiway , Best auto I have ever owned.
      Wetstuff
      • 2 Years Ago
      I have had two - a Pig-Out 505 wagon and a 300D wagon. Other than stinky shoes, I never had an issue. I would have a small to mid-size SUV in a heartbeat. Bring it KIA! That CX-5 looks good too - GFB. Jim
      Tuckair2@aol.com
      • 2 Years Ago
      Diesels usually have turbos I own a backhoe with a turbo and two farm tractors with turbos. Put the right turbo with the right boost (and a waste gate) on almost anyengine of anysize gas or diesel and you will increase the power of that engine by up to 50% or more. More air and fuel enjection will make it run better and cleaner.. The beat part is it's basically free since the exhaust from the engine spins the turbo. It baffels me why detroit does not use more as Ford is now doing ion its Mustang & F 150 V-6. This thing will preform right up there with the V-8's and on a lot less fuel. Talk about "fleet average" someone is missing the boat here??
      bnpage577
      • 2 Years Ago
      There are many cars in Europe that have very good Diesel engines. Ford, General Motors, Audi, BMW, and many more. These engines last longer, burn just as clean as the gasoline engines in most cases. The newer diesel engines burn a lot cleaner. These new diesel engines with or with a turbo, run as fast as the gasoline engines. There many grades of diesel fuel, the Euro fuels have a grade the run very clean. If we started to use more diesel the price of this fuel would drop. Since most of the price of diesel is taxes.
      A P
      • 2 Years Ago
      Its a shame that diesel sales are increasing for cars since they produce more particulates than gas engines. They are just not needed for cars at all. Light trucks and SUVs are a far different story....it is nice to have the torque for towing, but why does a car need 350lbs of torque? Add the added cost in fuel, the cost of the diesel option and there is no economic reason to get one. When choked down to keep particulates to a reasonable level, diesel loses most of its MPG advantage, so whats the point? Another point the lemmings dont like to admit is that diesel fuel uses more energy to produce than gasoline. So before any boobs start preaching about how much more efficient diesel is, they need to admit that when you factor in ALL these things: fuel cost, added pollution, cost of diesel option and added energy to produce the fuel itself, there is no compelling argument for diesel cars. Sure they drive just fine and if you like the way they drive, good for you. Just dont pretend they are some miracle technology. I think there is enough soot in the air thank you. My daughter just came back home after a year in Italy in school. She said in the inner cities you can scrape the soot from buildings with your finger.....its filthy. Add to all of the supposedly "superior" Europeans that smoke like crazy, she was so glad to come home to the US. Oh and she noticed more fat people there than here BTW.
        DeathKnoT
        • 2 Years Ago
        @A P
        I'm currently in the Netherlands for a week and a half trip. Sure their are overweight people. Doesn't seem that different from home really. Except when it comes to really overweight people. Haven't seen seriously obese people. The diesels here are very clean i can't tell they drive by until i noticed the very quite clatter. When i'm home i'm breathing in way more particulate matter i'll tell you that. Noting smokes over here. Even my own pickup makes way more particulate matter back home and do nearly all the semis, and medium duty trucks i see on the road. Even old jetta tdi's.
          coneknocker
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DeathKnoT
          Guys, we're missing something here. Clearly there is a fuel problem and an overweight people problem. Forget diesel and hybrids. Let's just harvest the fat from overweight people and run cars on it? It is a renewable resource that I doubt is going away any time soon.
        montoym
        • 2 Years Ago
        @A P
        Yet again, in the US (and increasingly the rest of the world) diesels have to meet the same emissions standards as gasoline cars. The SAME, not different standards for diesels. That include the limits for PM. Diesels are not allowed to emit more PM than gasoline cars in the US or they cannot be sold here. Was it always this way, no, but it has been this way since 2008 when the Tier2 regulations went into effect. As usual, your data is woefully outdated. If you feel otherwise, please post links for proof of your "facts" as opposed to just blathering on abotu your outdated nonsense.
        MJC
        • 2 Years Ago
        @A P
        You clearly have absolutely no idea what you are talking about.
        mitytitywhitey
        • 2 Years Ago
        @A P
        I wish I could down vote you more than once.
          k_m94
          • 2 Years Ago
          @mitytitywhitey
          Do what the trolls do: make a dozen of accounts as downvoting ammo.
          mitytitywhitey
          • 2 Years Ago
          @mitytitywhitey
          you would know, wouldn't you TROLL
        mkoesel
        • 2 Years Ago
        @A P
        So in summation: "My opinion is better than everyone else's, so I am going to go ahead and just insult everybody because why be friendly when you can be rude? I am a grumpy, cranky old man and people wonder why I am such a pain in the ass. I tend to get all worked up about things because it takes my mind off my own real problems. Oh, and Europeans are fat, dirty people, just like a crappy diesel engine. Diesel = the devil. My daughter is better than you because she went to Italy."
        k_m94
        • 2 Years Ago
        @A P
        It's a shame that A P's comments are increasing since they are increasing the amount of digital pollution on the internet. They are not needed for this blog at all. Begone!
      desinerd1
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hybrid is winning, despite AB pimping for diesel.
        MJC
        • 2 Years Ago
        @desinerd1
        AB is an enthusiast site. Of course, many here will prefer diesels to hybrids because: Hybrids are heavy and slow. Diesels have great torque and therefore great acceleration where you need it most in the US (30-50 mph).
          k_m94
          • 2 Years Ago
          @MJC
          That was a reply to desitard.
          k_m94
          • 2 Years Ago
          @MJC
          Funny, they seem to do much better than similar class hybrids.
        mitytitywhitey
        • 2 Years Ago
        @desinerd1
        Worldwide, the 100 year old diesel continues destroying hybrid sales. If the US used euro regs, diesel sales would be higher, and even might have blocked hybrid growth, which may attribute some success to the lack of competition in diesels in the US
        k_m94
        • 2 Years Ago
        @desinerd1
        If sales#s are the only indicator of winning, then the Toyota Camry, Prius, and Corolla are the best cars in the world. Actually, I bet you would agree with that. Both technologies are "winners" in terms of efficiency, and are welcomed choices.
        QCRamAir
        • 2 Years Ago
        @desinerd1
        desinerd1, shouldn't you be on your way to register for school with your parents? Classes start back up in a few weeks ya know.
        Jon Acton
        • 2 Years Ago
        @desinerd1
        not about winning or losing; it's about having choices. Also, if diesels were such a bad choice then why is GM, Chrysler, Mazda, and the Germans looking to bring more diesels here? you just keep pimping you souless nerd-mobile while I go have fun and drive.
          desinerd1
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Jon Acton
          oh really? How do you explain BMW Mercedes and Audi coming out with more and more hybrids. Diesel cars has been around for 100 years. Hybrids have been around for only 10 years and yet sell four times more.
      desinerd1
      • 2 Years Ago
      "Diesel vehicle sales up 27.5% so far in 2012" "Hybrid sales are also up, according to the report, increasing by 63.5 percent over 2011's levels" So, hybrids are growing much faster than diesels, but Autoblog is pimping for diesels. diesels are overpriced, overweight and less reliable. They don't even break even the extra cost over the life of car. Lame, really lame.
        Ducman69
        • 2 Years Ago
        @desinerd1
        Uhhh, equivelent turbo diesels are both less expensive and lighter weight and more compact than an equivelent hybrid vehicle, as the batteries in hybrids are quite expensive, large, and heavy at this time. It is also unlikely that a NiMH battery pack (the most common in hybrids) will have over 60% of its new available capacity ten years down the road even if it doesn't fail completely, the packs aren't all that cheap after you factor in labor too (not easy to service), whereas moden diesels should do at minimum 100,000 miles problem free with normal maintenance. Herped the derp on that one, bro.
        montoym
        • 2 Years Ago
        @desinerd1
        There are far more hybrid models available with more and more available each year. Diesels have a limited number of models and most have been around for a while already so the increase in sales of the diesels is significant.
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