Next up in the "Whoa, what?!" department is a report on Inside Line wondering whether the current Nissan GT-R will be the last Nissan GT-R. The website's sources have learned that Renault-Nissan CEO Carlos Ghosn has yet to sign off on a next-generation car, which suggests the future model hasn't even begun development. And those same sources say they're not sure Ghosn will ever give the green light.

We're only speculating, but perhaps the problem – if there really is a problem and this isn't Ghosn machinating – has to do with this tidbit taken from the IL story: "Ghosn approved the original GT-R only after being assured that it would make money for the company even at low volumes." We wouldn't be suprised if the shade under 6,000 sales in four years is quite a bit lower than the "low volumes" predicted in Nissan's original cost/benefit calculus.

At launch, the 480-horsepower GT-R MSRP was $69,850, or $71,900 if you wanted the Premium model. Peanuts are cheaper, which is probably why the GT-R has cost substantially more every single year: after its first year, the price jumped to $76,840 for the base model and $79,090 for the Premium; the next year brought a price bump to $80,790 or $83,040 for the Premium; the following year, the base model disappeared and the Premium rose by a premium of $1,020 to $84,060; in 2012 the price took another leap to $90,950; and for 2013, it was another gulp-worthy price boost to $96,820. Yes, the 2013 iteration has 55 more horsepower than the original model and a 2.7-second 0-to-60 time, and yes, you'd look a long time for a sub-$100K car to match its performance, but at that price, the GT-R is mixing with the kinds of sexy metal that can bring attributes to the table that the GT-R can't match.

But of course, along with not knowing if Ghosn will approve a followup to the current car, we don't know why he hasn't done it already – maybe he's changed his mind about that Infiniti GT-R after all, or maybe he hopes you'll be satisfied with the Juke-R. If this car is a "one-hit wonder," though, it was certainly a wonder, if perhaps not enough of a sales hit.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 201 Comments
      Daekwan
      • 2 Years Ago
      Here's the real problem with the GT-R. For all the performance it provides, it still misses with so many people. 1) The biggest fanbase of the GT-R, the "import boy racer" cant afford it. When it launched at $70K it was already out of their price range, at $90K and still increasing its simply never going to happen. 2) The sportscar audience that can afford a $90K, doesnt want to pay $90K for a Nissan. That is new Porsche or used Ferrari/Lambo pricing. Those cars might not match the GT-R's all out performance, but how many owners use all the performance anyways. The vast majority of 6-figure sports cars were sold because they were exotic, not just due to great performance. Spin the GT-R anyway you want, its just not exotic as its competition. 3) The GT-R is losing Nissan money. Companies dont stay around because they lose money, companies stay around because they make moeny. And Nissan has already been pushed towards the bankruptcy wall in the last decade. With slumping sales, crumbling world economies & rising Yen.. Japanese car manufacters are already dealing with enough negatives. If Nissan cant figure out a way to make a profit on the GT-R, or use its technology to profit in some other form. Then it simply wont be around much longer.
        Gorgenapper
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Daekwan
        Well said.
        Vinuuz
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Daekwan
        Can't agree more.. i was actually shocked when I recently saw the price on the 2013 GT-R. The last time I ever checked the price, I remember seeing 70k odd. How many millionaires wan't to make practical choices while buying cars! ?
        FuelToTheFire
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Daekwan
        1) The GT-R's main target is "import boy racers"? Excuse me?? I am a GT-R owner and I am in no way part of that demographic. That crowd prefers buying 90's Civics and modding them up. I tend to think that the owners of the GT-R are track focused customers who want the best performance out of a vehicle under the 6 figure mark. They are more "car-enthuiastic" in general, from my observations so far, than People buy Ferarris and Lambos because of the badge on the hood, Porsche is a slightly less extreme version of this, and the buyers also know that Porsches are luxurious. People who buy Corvettes like the looks or the sound. When you see a GT-R owner, you know that the owner is definitely not buying his car because of the cachet, or the looks, he is buying it because he is an auto enthusiast. 2) This is partially true. Porsches and Ferarris are great performance vehicles, but the fact just remains that the majority of people buying them are posers. The GT-R is sold mostly to enthusiasts, so it sells less. 3) In order to promote itself, a company needs a halo car, so that they can show the world what they are capable of. This role is crucial to the company's image, and as such, Nissan needs to keep the GT-R around.
          Josh
          • 2 Years Ago
          @FuelToTheFire
          1) and some people buy the GT-R based upon its performance in a video game a lot of the times - what is the point? Do not think your racing it, so im crossing that off the list. The only reason I'm left is because you had north of $70k in your pocket and didn't want to drive a porsche or ferrari like everyone else. People like you exist but obvously not enough to keep the car going business-wise. 2. See above for 'posers'. Plenty of posers from the $20,000 Civic Si to the $95,000 GT-R. Again whats your point 3. i do not think you are listening to the latest financial reports. the best way for nissan to promote itself at this point is to stay alive as a car company. This is very hard now in case you haven't noticed. posturing and whining like a fanboi still won't create the business case needed for a $100,000 halo car. The best thing at this point for NIssan to break even and grab some kudos from the performance crowd is to quit trying to play the country club set (literally - thats the only place i see them parked) and bring back something for the masses like the Silvia. You want a halo? That's why you have bagels @ the infiniti dealership.
          FuelToTheFire
          • 2 Years Ago
          @FuelToTheFire
          My comment got cut off. "They are more car enthusiastic than Porsche or Ferrari owners, in my opinion." @ Josh. There aren't many posers buying the GT-R. The GT-R doesn't have any brand cachet, nor does it have a comfy soft interior. People who buy the GT-R are almost always true enthusiasts.
      FuelToTheFire
      • 2 Years Ago
      As a GT-R owner, this is simply depressing news. It is just sad to see how bean counters manage brands, how poseurs dominate over car enthusiasts in the market, and how the Japanese sports cars (Supra, 3000 VR-4, Evo, GT-R) are disappearing like rabbits.
      wasabii
      • 2 Years Ago
      Just give the ugly chick who's great in bed some plastic surgery. That should increase desirability.
        Dean Hammond
        • 2 Years Ago
        @wasabii
        bingo, a car with these specs should look a hellishing lot better....total Butter Face.
        Gorgenapper
        • 2 Years Ago
        @wasabii
        TBH, I love the look of the GT-R. It has a purposeful look to it, a kind of melding of sports car symmetry and visual cues that would not look out of place on a fighter jet. It isn't curvaceous or nearly as exotic-looking as some other high end sports cars, but it has its own understated identity.
      lne937s
      • 2 Years Ago
      Converted to Yen, the original US price was more expensive (~110 yen per dollar) than the current price (~78 yen per dollar). The rise of the Yen has led to an environment where cars made in Japan have a tough time competing on price. That is a major reason why Nissan now makes more cars in North America than it does in Japan and intends to move even more production out of Japan. It's great for the US economy, but hopefully it doesn't mean the end of these types of cars. Hopefully they can find a way to make it work.
      Shahul X
      • 2 Years Ago
      Owned one.. Loved it. I do prefer a more visceral car and a manual trans but amazing performance anyone can get in and experience
      Jon
      • 2 Years Ago
      Nooooooooo!!! Don't stop Godzilla yet! Especially now when its presence is REALLY felt worldwide (unlike before the Japanese wants them GT-Rs for themselves :)). Naaah but it's just rumors that hopefully isn't true. I heard before the next GT-R will be hybrid. And GT-R is Nissan, and Nissan is GT-R, it's not an Infiniti. Make another supercar for the Infiniti badge to rape the Lexus' LFA. :)
      mikemaj82
      • 2 Years Ago
      they're going to price themselves right out of the game in 2.7 seconds lolol
      Amco
      • 2 Years Ago
      oh and I'm sure this isn't going to help or matter but I know about 20 people that say the GTR is their dream car and can't afford it. Heck, me too. I'd love to own one, but it doesn't make sense at my income. So my next car is a Caddy ATS 2.0T 6MT. I have to settle for my daily commute.
        lewazzinaroillus
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Amco
        that's this cars main problem!,...20 teens who love the thing, but can't really buy it!,..versus the actual older, wealthy buyers, who CAN buy the thing,..but who hate it!,..and instead are buying 911's and vettes and beemer m3's,...etc.,..THAT'S this cars real problem in a nut shell!
      rmkensington
      • 2 Years Ago
      Every company should have a crazy out of place performance car. Its good advertising for Nissan. Chevy sells the vette, ford has the GT500, bmw has the m5.
        Zeus
        • 2 Years Ago
        @rmkensington
        Mercedes has the SLS, Audi has the R8, even Fiat has the Abarth 500. COME ON NISSAN!
        lewazzinaroillus
        • 2 Years Ago
        @rmkensington
        but you;re forgetting the central point here!,...folks ain't spending now 100 k on a nissan,..porsche gets away with it cause it's ALWAYS been a high end car manufacturer,...same with bmw,..and ferrari of course,..even the vette zr1 got away with it,...it sells slightly more than the gtr,..but not by much!,..ya have to have the brand cache once you cross the 100k threshold i think...
          Zeus
          • 2 Years Ago
          @lewazzinaroillus
          Thats true.
      Hazdaz
      • 2 Years Ago
      I don't buy it. Most larger automakers need some kind of "halo" vehicle in their lineup... and its typically not for the money they make from it, but rather the image it puts the entire company on. While I doubt it will go away, I wouldn't doubt that it changes for its next iteration. Infiniti will absolutely get a version of the next GTR. They need to do that to spread out costs. I also wouldn't be that surprised if Renault gets a version of it too. They might all look very different, but in some way shape or form, I think any future GTR chassis will be used on a variety of high end cars. Renault has that stunning Alpine A110 concept. I don't think that that car and the GTR would really be able to share a platform without major changes to both, but some kind of connection would happen.
        Josh
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Hazdaz
        You don't buy it? Well I think that's the exactly the issue here: nobody's really buying the car. Well those that have the means to at least. Your comments are written like a true car guy, a romantic if you will. O, if you just continue to pursue that girl she will eventually give in - until you accidentally stab her in the face... The car certainly at its current state is certainly an evolution of everything Nissan has learned building an AWD twin turbo monster but that current state has now officially left its business niche and plan and what happens to cars when they do that? Their factories are usually converted to manufacture SUVs. Just ask the 1996 300ZX TT.
          Hazdaz
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Josh
          I couldn't be farther from a "romantic" when it comes to the car industry if I tried. I look at the industry with a pragmatic view. Nissan needs to spread its costs over a much larger group of cars. Its really that simple. The fact that Nissan has a whole other division of expensive cars, as well as a French partner, there is no reason not to give those brands the same platform to share. Oh yeah, and any factory that is set up for making a car as low-volume car as the GTR will most definitely not be a good fit for making a (presumably) high-volume vehicle like an SUV. At least not with major modifications.
          carguy1701
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Josh
          You mean the GM B-body. The Z32 continued in Japan until 2000.
      wooootles
      • 2 Years Ago
      That's too bad... It did have wonderful performance and technology that beats Euro-exotics for less than 100 large. I hope Nissan continues the GT-R for another new redesign, and maybe this time try to find out how its archrivals, the 911 Turbo and the Corvette, actually make profits for their company...
        Zeus
        • 2 Years Ago
        @wooootles
        simple: they mark the cars way up and sell sh*t loads of them. It would be interesting to see world wide where the most GT-Rs have been sold and where the least have been sold.
          lewazzinaroillus
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Zeus
          they reallyweren't a hit anywhere,..and i read they were even having a hard time of late moving them in japan!,...that's REALLY pitiful, if true!
        lewazzinaroillus
        • 2 Years Ago
        @wooootles
        porsche would have killed the gtr LONG AGO my friend,..they are notoriously brutal on cars that don't sell!,..they kill em off at the drop of a hat,..look into their history to see that confirmed!,...simple fact is that the 911 just clearly from the get go of the gtr's launch,..was considered by wealthy car buyers[yes,..the actually folks with the money to buy them,..NOT TEENAGE FAN BOYS!] the better choice,..maybe not the "faster" choice,..but the one with more brand appeal and cache,..and at this price point,..THAT'S ALMOST EVERYTHING!
        MANARC100
        • 2 Years Ago
        @wooootles
        Well for starters the 911 and Vette each sell well over 1500 cars per year if the article has its production facts correct. Interesting that the Vette, which gets harshly criticized for being an old guys car vs. this better and younger generation car, outsells it over 10:1. This does not bode well for our generation getting many more super cars in the future that are not total exotics.
          Weezle Eye
          • 2 Years Ago
          @MANARC100
          Dude, the Corvette has fcuking awesome power and looks so much better than this johnny-come-lately.
          MANARC100
          • 2 Years Ago
          @MANARC100
          I wasnt knocking the vette at all. I leased a 2009 C6 and only swapped it because i have children now. I was definately one of the younger guys ive seen driving one. But after reading the blogs for years i was lead to believe that most comenters would prefer a GTR to a vette and that most commenters are not 60 years old. Of the GTR's have have seen in the wild they all have been driven by a younger male (35-45)
          lewazzinaroillus
          • 2 Years Ago
          @MANARC100
          porsche sells now almost 1000 911's a month in the u.s. alone my friend,...since it's refresh to the 991 generation,..easily clobbering the gtr in sales by a 10 to 1 ratio....
        shawoo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @wooootles
        Part of the blame is the NA dealers here. I was ready to buy one of the 1st ones off the boat. Paper work all done. Money exchanged, me looking at the car in the lot. I get walked off to a room to finalize what I think is me getting the keys. But noooooo. The dealer asked me to sign what looked like a kinkos make document saying that I give up my warranty to the car if I disable the traction control. I said you must me kidding. They weren't. I left with my money in hand. Bought an M3.
      tomatoflight
      • 2 Years Ago
      What a shame if true. These Japanese companies are really disappointing lately. Mitsu with the EVO, Toyota with the Supra, maybe the GT-R is pulled by Nissan, no idea if a RX-9 ever shows up... Depressing.
    • Load More Comments