Chevrolet has stepped up to the NASCAR Nationwide Series plate with a racer that not only isn't an Impala, it isn't bad on the eyes. The junior series to the Sprint Cup big dogs had made concessions to allow cars that look more like their production counterparts. While some disagree, the cars still have nothing to do with their production counterparts, but hey, that's NASCAR. The new rules induced Ford to hop in with a Mustang, while Dodge opted to go with a Challenger. Chevy, on the other hand, stuck with its Impala.

No more: welcome the new Camaro to the NASCAR Nationwide Series. No, it won't be that much different than its Mustang, Challenger and Camry competition underneath its blue, blue skin, but from this angle that's all right. If they could run it just like this, with no sponsor stickers to get in the way, well, we think that would be epic.

Chevrolet will begin racing the Camaro next season, while the Impala will also be replaced in the Sprint Cup series when the new Chevrolet SS NASCAR racer makes it debut at the Daytona 500 next year.


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  • 61 Comments
      Phil B
      • 2 Years Ago
      Half-assed Camaro front + generic '90s greenhouse = design fail.
      Sir Duke
      • 2 Years Ago
      I grew up watching NASCAR / Stock car racing. The Coors/Melling Thunderbird #9 driven by "Awesome Bill from DawsonVille: was the LAST NASCAR car that was even remotely of the production car that it was named for. I might even be inclined to give you Dale Sr.'s Goodwrench Lumina and early Jeff Gordon cars. Okay, here is my beef with NASCAR. With every passing year, the cars look worse. Current attempt at making a Mustang out of the NASCAR template failed, this abomination they're trying to pass off as a Camaro is even worse. These have got to be the laziest mechanics/stylists in all of auto-racing. Sad, because I really used to like NASCAR. So NASCAR, stop being so goddamned lazy, take the actual STOCK cars and ENGINEER whatever safety features you deem necessary into them. Every NASCAR racer should at least start out with a "white" racing chassis from the respective manufacturers. Ford, GM and MOPAR (sorry Toyota) all offer these shells without VINs for racing. Until then, NASCAR is not worth the electricity it takes to run my TV, so I won't be watching.
      daveogermany
      • 2 Years Ago
      Kill it with fire...
      john m
      • 2 Years Ago
      This thing looks rediculous! Maybe it'll look a lot better with a big Viagra sticker on the side. At first I thought it was a toy too...
      Agent55
      • 2 Years Ago
      1987 called, they want their car back.
      kevsflanagan
      • 2 Years Ago
      Still waiting on the day that people wake up and decide to watch ALMS or Grand AM for legit "stock car" racing.
        Bobby_Sards
        • 2 Years Ago
        @kevsflanagan
        but remember, it was never meant for "stock" cars, nascar was simply created to race the bootleggers "stock" looking vehicles (with heavy mods done to the engine)...thanks top gear USA (useless tv show otherwise)
          ImpulseGTO
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Bobby_Sards
          actually alot of them were "stock" cars straight from the dealerships when NASCAR first came together.
          carguy1701
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Bobby_Sards
          ImpulseGTO is correct. Back in the day (when dinosaurs walked the earth, aka when our parents/grandparents were growing up), the cars and engines used in NASCAR were production based, in some case taken straight off the dealership floor. Homologation requirements were responsible for cars like the Mustang Boss 429. it was not until 1970 that a changeover from production-based cars to silhouette cars occurred, mainly for aero and safety reasons IIRC, maybe cost as well.
      RJC
      • 2 Years Ago
      Any sport or performance car appearance it had, as an original Camaro, is now gone since it attained that nascar stance. It really looks no different from anything else they run. Take a lesson from any of the road racing series out there on how a 'race car' should look.
      mikeymac
      • 2 Years Ago
      I thought this was a toy car when i saw it at first..
      drewbiewhan
      • 2 Years Ago
      This looks cartoonish and lame IMO...
      Cruising
      • 2 Years Ago
      No bashing intended but dam that looks dated like something straight out of the 80s. I suppose that's partly just due to the retro styling of the street car.
      Herbie
      • 2 Years Ago
      AB readers are more sophisticated than the general motoring public so they know that since around 2007 NASCAR has implemented (first) Car of Tomorrow and (now) Car of Today. EVERY model being raced fits the same template. Minor aerodynamic inclusions in the grill are basically authorized, but the fact is the rest is just semantics and it matters not whether it's called Camry, Fusion, Charger, or Camaro. Forget hating - it's racing, enjoy it and have some fun.
      Jason
      • 2 Years Ago
      no accident that the rear of this presentation car was obscured by the shadow in the room... they certainly could have arranged the lighting to be better if they wanted to. The back of the car is nothing like the Camaro and when viewed in whole this looks terrible, nothing like the Camaro. (same as the Mustang it will race against, btw) I don't think this good concept of racing the modern pony nameplates against eachother is playing out as well as it sounds on paper. The Challenger looks pretty good, but that's in part because the street car is more of a two-door sedan that approximates the templates better.
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