Is hydrogen a dangerous substance? It is, during the London Olympics, at least. That's why the fleet of five H2 buses that usually carries passengers between Covent Garden and Tower Gateway have been sent out to pasture for the duration of the games. Standard diesel buses will replace them.

The reason is that the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA), which is responsible for "planning and delivering transport infrastructure and operations to support the Games," required that no hydrogen be stored at the buses' refueling site in Lea Interchange in Stratford between July and mid-September 2012 "in the interests of security," reports London SE1.

Since going into service, the buses have refueled over 1,000 times, writes Bus and Coach. Hydrogen supplier Air Products' Diana Raine said the buses have been "a great success to date," even though Bus and Coach also says the vehicles have been out of service almost as much as they have been in use because of maintenance issues and difficulty in getting spare parts. In any case, we're pretty sure that diesel fuel can be dangerous, too. It's not like the Olympic security rules make a whole lot of sense. WiFi hotspots, for example? Not allowed.


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  • 17 Comments
      Andre Neves
      • 2 Years Ago
      Honestly, why would anyone want this Olympic fiasco hosted in their own city? No benefit and nothing but headaches and problems.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Storm
      • 2 Years Ago
      " we're pretty sure that diesel fuel can be dangerous, too." because diesel is sooo combustible..
      - v o c t u s -
      • 2 Years Ago
      Can someone explain why the bus on the right seems to be headed for the intersection of Elephant Rd and Cattle St? Those wacky brits!
        aatbloke1967
        • 2 Years Ago
        @- v o c t u s -
        Elephant & Castle is a famous district in London, and named after a public house. There's a chain of Elephant & Castle pubs in the United States, named after the London original.
      Smartalox
      • 2 Years Ago
      Interestingly, the fleet of hydrogen powered busses in Whistler, Canada operated without incident during the 2010 Olympic winter games, and several hydrogen-powered fuel cell cars shuttled VIPs around Vancouver, also without incident. Hydrogen explosions make a lot of noise, but do very little damage. A hydrogen tanker once exploded and caught fire at the company where I worked. It rattled windows for miles, but when the fire was extinguished (someone closed the hydrogen valve on the trailer) the tanker drove away under it's own power.
      SloopJohnB
      • 2 Years Ago
      Dumb. Diesel fuel and oxidizer, ummm, ANFO anyone?
        Scr
        • 2 Years Ago
        @SloopJohnB
        Then you need to bring in a ton of oxidizer, and someone will notice that. Not so with the hydrogen, which is highy explosive on its own with very little extra effort. The real issue isn't the busses themselves, that explosion would be contained to a relativly small area if not the bus itself. The real issue it is the bus's refueing station, which has "Oh, the humanity!" quantities of hydrogen stored WITHIN the secured zone for the 'lympics. Part of security protocal is to have anything that potentially dangerous drained, and thats is what they did, so they cannot refuel the busses. I don't know how successful these busses are if they are out of service more than they are in...seems like a total waste of money.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
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