Renault, which has worked with Better Place to give the Fluence electric vehicle its juice in Israel, is looking to Qualcomm for help with the emerging wireless charging trend. Renault and Qualcomm today announced that they had signed a Memorandum of Understanding that they would cooperate "on the London trial of Qualcomm Halo Wireless Electric Vehicle Charging (WEVC) technology." More importantly, the end goal here is to conduct "preliminary studies of the integration of this technology into Renault vehicles."

Qualcomm's London WEVC trial was announced late last year and brings together a number of governmental authorities and companies in the UK to install and test wireless electric cars. Qualcomm's wireless technology comes from the University of Auckland's HaloIPT, which Qualcomm puchased last year.
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Qualcomm and Renault Announce Memorandum of Understanding on Wireless Electric Vehicle Charging Technology

LONDON, July 24, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Qualcomm Incorporated (NASDAQ: QCOM) and Renault s.a.s. today announced a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) concerning their intended cooperation on the London trial of Qualcomm Halo™ Wireless Electric Vehicle Charging (WEVC) technology, and their intent with respect to conducting preliminary studies of the integration of this technology into Renault vehicles. Renault will also join the London trial steering committee.

In November 2011, Qualcomm announced a WEVC trial in London to commence in 2012 that is supported by a cross section of stakeholders ranging from government departments and agencies to commercial and private sector enterprises. The objectives of the trial are to evaluate the commercial viability of wireless EV charging and gain user feedback on the use of WEVC-enabled vehicles.

"We are very excited about the prospects of working with Renault, a global leader in electric vehicles and an innovator in the growing low carbon vehicle market," said Anthony Thomson, vice president of business development and marketing at Qualcomm. "Renault's participation in the WEVC London trial aligns with Qualcomm's drive to make charging of electric vehicles simple and effortless."

"Our intended participation in the WEVC London trial with Qualcomm complements Renault's European research and development project involving 10 partners to demonstrate wireless inductive charging of electric vehicles in a public environment with a high level of performance and safety," said Jacques Hebrard, vice president of Energy and Environment Advanced Projects director at Renault. "The deployment of wireless inductive charging requires inter-operability between cars and ground systems within common European and, hopefully, worldwide standards."

About Qualcomm
Qualcomm Incorporated (NASDAQ: QCOM) is the world leader in 3G and next-generation wireless technologies. For more than 25 years, Qualcomm ideas and inventions have driven the evolution of digital communications, linking people everywhere more closely to information, entertainment and each other. For more information, visit Qualcomm's website, OnQ blog, Twitter and Facebook pages.

About Renault
Renault was created in France over 110 years ago and has been active on international markets ever since. It designs, develops, manufactures and sells a broad range of vehicles through a network of 350 industrial and commercial sites in 118 countries. Its full range of electric vehicles accessible to all is the standard-bearer of its environmental commitment. The Group is aiming for leadership in CO2 emissions thanks to its zero emission in use product line and new generation of combustion engines. The average emissions of its European product range will drop from 137 g/km in 2010 to 120g/km in 2013 and below 100g/km in 2016. Today's Renault features innovation for all, top-quality products and services and a new design philosophy.

The company continues to pursue its strategy of profitable growth with its associated brands, Dacia and Renault Samsung Motors. The Renault group employs 128,000 people worldwide, reported net revenues of €42,628 million in 2011 and sold more than 2.7 million vehicles in 2011.

Qualcomm is a trademark of Qualcomm Incorporated, registered in the United States and other countries. Qualcomm Halo is a trademark of Qualcomm Incorporated. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 13 Comments
      Marcopolo
      • 2 Years Ago
      @ krisztiant I used to be a lonely voice in favour of wireless charging. Criticism ranged between being immoral ( too decadent and unnecessary ) to inefficient and dangerous. The more simple and idiot-proof you can make a product to operate, the easier the product is to market. The concept of deep charging and battery management regimes, alarms the average motorist, who expect the inboard computer to take care of all an EV's operations, including charging. Wireless charging combines convenience and security. Joeviocoe points out that initially it will be more expensive. Automatic transmissions were also more expensive when introduced by GM in the 1940 Oldsmobile, but since then automatics have become the dominant choice of technology for US car buyers.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Marcopolo
        Marco, "Joeviocoe points out that initially it [wireless charging] will be more expensive. " If for some strange reason we would even take into consideration Joevioco's "logic" (please notice the quotation marks ön the word "logic"), then this follows from his great idea: As BEVs "initially will be more expensive" than ICEs, we shouldn't use BEVs ever. Conclusion: 'fanbois' never ever use logic, therefore, reasonable people just have to ignore them, as if you argue with them, it just makes them even more furiously defend their famed "logic". #justignorefanbois
          • 2 Years Ago
          Exactly Marco, Batteries and BEVs are the subjects of some kind of fetishism, as objects which believed to have supernatural powers, or in particular a man-made object that has power over others, as well as, possesses inherent value and powers. But even if I can easily realize this, replying endlessly on attacks based on this "modern fetishism" gets annoying after a particular time. There is no problem with preferring EVs to FCVs, although FCVs are clearly EVs too, but this contradicts with the fetishism's object (which is the battery). Batteries have their role and place in the future of transportation, but it looks like fuel cells will have an even bigger duty, as you just can't beat the convenience (and energy density / range) of fuel. I know it takes lots of time to accept and reconcile with that, but sometimes we have to give some feedback to develop a balance.
          Marcopolo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @ krisztiant As usual, it's impossible to deny the accuracy of your post. However, I can't agree with your comment to Joeviocoe that he's a " boring and annoying guy with an incredibly poor imagination." Joe's may not be all that logical, but hey, he's a passionate guy, who's usually willing to listen to reason. Joe see's thing's though the prism of philosophy. While that can be a bit illogical, his heart's usually is in the right place! I realize some of his comments, may give the impression that Joe's a leftist reductionist, but that's not really where Joe's at. I can understand his passion for EV'.s and his do-it-yourself approach. (he's a bit like those old folk musicians who took such exception to Bob Dylan moving away from solely acoustic music :) I prefer EV's to FCV's, because I can build an EV ! In a small way, I can be part of the early EV industry. That doesn't mean I am opposed to FCV's. (that would be absurd)! But, FCV's have no room for the enthusiast pioneer. FCV's are the realm of the major Auto-manufacturers, as indeed are EV's ! Sadly, developments like wireless charging, and EREV's, symbolize the end of the enthusiast era. It's not all about logic, passion is also important ....
        karlInSanDiego
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Marcopolo
        and 72 years later automatic transmissions are still more expensive to design, build, maintain and replace. Cost/value don't mark high on American's priorities, but autos don't dominate elsewhere. People rarely keep cars long enough to burn through a clutch nowadays but the auto really only gained a mark in the plus column when on some models it started exceeding manual fuel mileage.
          Marcopolo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @karlInSanDiego
          karlInSanDiego Actually, automatic's are more prevalent everywhere there are larger cars. People just like the convenience. Small engined cars used to be a little slow with auto's, and European manufacturers like Fiat, without automatic transmissions, were heavily protected in domestic markets. The Japanese and Korean automakers forged ahead with small auto's and without market protection, have seriously eroded the Asian/European manual small car market, especially with young female buyers.
      • 2 Years Ago
      Yes, and probably in any other areas as well, including at home, as people just have to park in their garages and the charging process 'automagically' starts. Whoever would consider this as a hassle?
      • 2 Years Ago
      Actually I intended to post this to the previous blog of ABG: "BMW i ventures invests in Coulomb; ChargePoint 4.0 coming soon" But now here it is, an interesting general summary about the issue by Forbes: "How Wireless Charging Will Make Life Simpler (And Greener)" Wireless charging could even be the Holy Grail for BEVs. But how? Let's see: An emerging trend - for some years now - about electric equipments s this: "Kill the Power Cord." "Make Charging an Electric Car Easier than Pumping Gas. Many people would like to buy an electric car, but are dogged by doubts about whether it has the range to get where they want to go, or worry that plugging it in will be a hassle. Wireless power could blunt both of these concerns — and even make the gas station burdensome by comparison." http://www.forbes.com/sites/davidferris/2012/07/24/how-wireless-charging-will-make-life-simpler-and-greener/ In the eyes of general human beings (i.e. not BEV fans, but the overwhelming majority) plugging in is a hassle, which actually is. But wireless power could blunt this concern and make the gas stations burdensome by comparison. Now that would be a 'trouvaille' for BEVs, which could even motivate people to buy them. Some more interesting tidbit from the article: "Anyone with a dying cellphone has wondered in frustration when our so-called “wireless” phones will cut that umbilical cord of modern life — the power cable. After years of speculation, the solution may finally be at hand: Samsung is expected release a wireless charging kit for its Galaxy S3 phone this fall." "Wireless power could reduce demand for power cables while making gadgets more durable, eliminate the need for throwaway batteries, and perhaps even accelerate the adoption of electric cars." "Here are some of the ways that wireless power transmission could change the world. 1) Kill the Power Cord. One of the obvious, and obviously awesome, benefits of wireless charging would be to ditch the power cord while on the move or to not have to plug in when at home... ...the highest failure rate in mobile equipment is the power cord, which becomes kinked and frayed with use... And of course, power cords that are never made will never need to be disposed of, eliminating a major source of e-waste. 2) Overthrow the Disposable Battery. Customers have never really taken to the rechargeable versions of batteries like AAAs, AAs and Ds. You just can’t beat the convenience of the standard alkaline battery that we pop into [everything]...  then toss into the landfill by the billions every year..." Conclusion: general people (you know, not BEV fans) prefer convenience over anything else, therefore, wireless power should be the new mantra for the BEV / Green industry, like this: "Kill the Power Cord" Forbes conclusion: "They say that it ain’t easy being green. But if wireless power catches on, it may become a whole lot easier." #killthepowercord
        Letstakeawalk
        • 2 Years Ago
        Wireless charging would make charging stations much more acceptable in areas with aesthetic or safety concerns.
        Joeviocoe
        • 2 Years Ago
        "In the eyes of general human beings (i.e. not BEV fans, but the overwhelming majority) plugging in is a hassle, which actually is." In the eyes of BEV "owners"... plugging in is NOT a hassle. Just ask them instead of assuming. There are several thousands of actual drivers now. People who think that is a hassle, tend to want to find any excuse not buy a BEV. ---------- Although, I am up for anything that makes things easier for people. But wireless charging is likely to cost more per kwh because of slight less efficiency and trying to recoup the higher cost of installation. And higher energy costs... is a "hassle". Also, adding another component to vehicle charging system won't be free... so potential buyers might see that higher upfront cost as a "hassle". Being "hassle-free" will come with higher costs initially Eventually it might be available and affordable for the rest of the general human beings.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          Joe, The problem (or your problem?) with general human beings' stance on plugging-in (i.e. hassle) that almost none of them buy BEVs, but as the - way more reasonable than you - Forbes article points out, wireless charging perhaps could even accelerate the adoption of electric cars (which even you should agree with). Also: your mentioned "several thousands of BEV owners" don't really count as general public, therefore, I shouldn't ask them what plugging-in looks like in their (biased) eyes. Consider my reply to Marco above as the finishing part of my reply to you. You just remained the same boring and annoying guy with an incredibly poor imagination.
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        I was struck in a recent video, I forget which one, by an electric motorist in a small city car stopping, and hauling his chunky power cable out of the tiny boot, where it had taken up most of the space. Actually plugging it in might be little hassle to the young and fit, but would be to the old and infirm, not to mention that you would get rained on in inclement weather as you would not be able to plug in and carry an umbrella. If you had much shopping to do, something would have ended up having to go on the back seat, as you couldn't get bags in plus the cable. Carrying power cables might not be the end of the world, but not having to is nothing but good. As for street furniture and clutter, here is a comparison from Halo showing pictures of a street using the two systems: http://www.oasys-software.com/dyna/en/events/users_jan-11/HaloIPT_Matt-Cooper.pdf If most cars are going to go electric, buried chargers are the only way I can see it working for cars parked on the street.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          Agreed. And we shouldn't forget the the already well known "unplugging" issues while still charging by 'impatient' fellow BEV owners or the "non-unplugged" power cables in already fully charged BEVs (not letting others to use it). Wireless charging can easily solve these otherwise hard to solve issues as well.
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