Shortly after the Army National Guard halted sponsorship of Stewart-Haas Racing, which fields teams for Tony Stewart and Ryan Newman, the U.S. House of Representatives voted to allow the military to continue using funds to advertise in sports, including NASCAR.

Reps. Jack Kingston, R-Ga., and Betty McCollum, D-Minn., sought to cut over $72 million from the defense budget in 2013, which would have ended sponsorship deals the military holds with NASCAR, IndyCar and National Hot Rod Association drag racing. The cuts would also have affected Ultimate Fighting Championship and bass fishing sponsorships.

Perhaps it's not surprising that major opposition to the plan came from representatives of North Carolina, Florida and Mississippi, hotbeds of NASCAR activity. In addition, a joint letter opposing the move was submitted by NASCAR, the IZOD IndyCar series, Major League Baseball, the National Football League and the National Basketball Association.

Ultimately, it appears that military advertisements at sporting events won't be going away in the foreseeable future.


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  • 28 Comments
      lad
      • 2 Years Ago
      Most of you are not going to like this; but, this is not a proper way to spend the tax-payer's money, i.e., by backing a private venture with tax money. Somewhere in the weeds there's a politician making a deal with NASCAR people for kicking back money for election campaigns and favors...you can bet on it! BTW, the ARMY has no problems filling the the ranks during this time of poor economics, they only take HS graduates and there is a waiting list. I would think the money better spent on returning wounded soldiers.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Typhon
      • 2 Years Ago
      From the other article: "Senator McCollum says she was told by the Guard themselves that the NASCAR sponsorship deal has brought in some 24,800 interested recruits. But of that group, only 20 were actually qualified to join the Guard. And of that same group, exactly zero joined. " Politics aside, these numbers are embarrassing.
      Charles Wayne Jackso
      • 2 Years Ago
      Look the Army is cutting down apox 90,000 troops...most of the others are downsizing....they dont need that kind of money going into a Nascar team....which has been over 125 million in the lst 4 years..they already funish fly overs at the races....this money should be redid and give to sign on bonus, or help with more worthy causes than sporting events....wounded warrior project...have a freind in National Guard Reserve...says cannot get money for his reserve unit.....but wasteful spending like this when on troop reduction does not make sense!
      joshua meade
      • 2 Years Ago
      The government should not been spending any extra money now at all with the debt. Also I never got why they need to put ads at all for the armed forces, everyone knows its out there.
      RocketRed
      • 2 Years Ago
      The issue is not how much it costs but does it benefit the Army in recruiting. Does the Army have the data to back up the spend? Is it a cheaper way to recruit people than the old-fashioned shoe-leather based approaches. You could make the same complaint about the TV ads trying to covince parents to let their kids sign up. But in any case it's a bit strange to have a national armed force advertising for recruits along with people hawking motor oil and web-hosting services.
        Joe Gordon
        • 2 Years Ago
        @RocketRed
        The data on recruitment via Nascar branding is pretty grim. According to a story I read on the web a couple of weeks ago, the military (all branches) got 'interest' (which means talking to recruiters either at the track or recruitment office from around 25,000 people. Of that, about 1200 followed up to the point of further meetings, but most were deemed unfit to serve for one reason or another, Only one actual recruit ever made into the service due to the Nascar tie-in, which says something about the physicality and iq of the Nascar crwod.
      Michael
      • 2 Years Ago
      NASCAR sponsorship by the Federal government is a very poor use of taxpayer money. I can think of 100 ways to train willing unemployed workers, for $72 million.
      Travisty
      • 2 Years Ago
      We don't have money for cancer screening for women, but we have $72m to paint a car so it can drive around in circles for a couple hours... Want to improve enrollment for our National Guard? How about stop sending them to Iraq for two years and keep them home for national emergencies? Get back to "two weekends a month, two weeks per year" as opposed to "get sent to Iraq for two years, get paid a pittance of what you were making previously and lose your home to foreclosure."
        SloopJohnB
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Travisty
        How about spending the money on investigating and prosecuting and incarcerating the rapists and sexual assaulters in the military? Still want to send your daughters to the military service academies or enlist them?
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        what
        • 2 Years Ago
        Or ask Mittens to pay more than 14% of his income in taxes.
      Brian
      • 2 Years Ago
      The US has the best democracy money can buy. It looks like someone must have been encouraged to change their mind with some cold hard cash.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Brian
        [blocked]
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Brent98
      • 2 Years Ago
      I don't take issue with how the military chooses to spend the recruiting budget it is given, NASCAR has proven to be an effective means of advertising for many entities not just the military. NASCAR does a lot for their sponsors, more than most pro sports, so I have no issue with the military choosing to spend its recruiting budget on NASCAR. In order to maintain an all-volunteer Army a certain amount must be spent on recruitment, but since we are decreasing our involvement in Iraq and Afghanistan I am not surprised that the recruiting budget is being looked at, I hope we do not have a need in the near future for a large number of recruits.
        Matt
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Brent98
        If you read the article just a couple weeks ago though they referenced a statistic (not sure if actually accurate or not), however the statistic showed that of all the recruits/interest they were getting from their advertising in NASCAR, only a small handful actually were allowed to join or made it through boot camp. I just feel that the amount being spent on racing sponsorships is a little wasteful in our current economic state.
          caddy-v
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Matt
          That referenced statistic is nothing but guess work. With an all volunteer military, any and all advertising has a bearing on the number of recruits that are drawn to enlist, wether it be NASCAR or any other form. Maybe we should return to the draft system and not have to worry about spending money on ads. Yeah, that's the ticket. Two years mandatory military service for everyone in order to qualify for any kind of government handout from food stamps to welfare checks.
          SloopJohnB
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Matt
          Looking at the lovely examples of manhood at NASCAR racetrack grandstands...it only stands to reason that NASCAR advertisement will successfully recruit the flower of American manhood.
          Matt
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Matt
          *just a couple days ago (the other article)
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