One Minnesota inventor may have just created a better bed step.

While Ford offers a pickup bed step that slides out of the top of the tailgate on its F-150, that particular step can't be used when towing. Now, one man has devised his own step that slides out of the side of the tailgate.

Myron Isaacson recently received the patent on his pickup bed ladder, affectionately named "My Dream Steps," according to a local news report.

It works in a similar manner as the Ford bed step, allowing a person to climb into a high pickup bed without grinding their knees against the truck's steel. Because this step works from the side of the tailgate, Isaacson's invention allows the truck owner to climb into the bed even if the truck has a trailer attached. The new assembly looks pretty compact and easy to use, and he's already won an award for its design. At this year's Minnesota Inventors Congress, Isaacson netted a gold medal.

Check out the video below to see it in action on Isaacson's Ford.
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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 81 Comments
      Hazdaz
      • 2 Years Ago
      Cool idea. Hot reporter. Terrible product name.
        Rob
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Hazdaz
        They should call it the "Old geezer step"
      Phillip
      • 2 Years Ago
      Remember when you could lean over the side and reach halfway across to get anything out of the bed? My last pickup I would step on the back bumper and climb over the tailgate. Now I drive a car and if I need something that doesn't fit I use a utility trailer.
        Hazdaz
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Phillip
        That's when full-size pickups were the size of our current crop of small pickup trucks. I find it disgusting just how enormous these vehicles have become, and even more so since the majority of them are used simply as family sedans. Seems that though all vehicles segments have experiences bloat with each redesign, but none more so than the full-size pickup category.
          TrueDat
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Hazdaz
          yes how enormous these vehicles have become. lets takae a look at the F150: 1999 F150 supercab SB 4x4 (edmunds): width - 79 inches height - 72 inches track - 65 inches ground clearance - 7.3 inches 2012 F150 supercab SB (ford): width - 79 inches height - 76 inches track - 67 inches ground clearance - 8.4 inches In summery, these newly disgusting trucks are a whopping 0 inches wider, a hug 4 inches taller, have an unbelievable 2 inch wider track, and almost an inch high ground clearance. Seems trucks really haven't grown as much as you tantrum leads people to believe.
          TrueDat
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Hazdaz
          please excuse my typos.. hit submit before proofing.
          Hazdaz
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Hazdaz
          @ TrueDat It also gained some 500 POUNDS! Why didn't you mention that? Beyond that, the numbers don't tell the whole story because it fills out its dimensions way more than it did in generations past with a taller bed and hood making visibility around this beast worse. But either way, that's just one version of this truck. Back in 1999, the SuperCrew cab didn't even exist. Compared to the longest version of the SB 1999 F150, the SC is about an inch wider, almost 3 inches taller, and almost 8 inches longer. In summary, The F-150 of today has a more squared-off design and is offered is in larger/longer varieties. The differences I mentioned above are not insignificant increases.
          StephenT
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Hazdaz
          Yeah one of the first manual shift vehicles I learned to drive was a little Dodge D50. Nice sized little truck. My dad had several Chevy Luvs, Datsun pickups, and Toyotas when I was growing up.
          d.hollywood
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Hazdaz
          The bigger the better as it relates to trucks.(imo) Will this be an "issue" for you when pickups become the first vehicles to go full-fleet hybrid?
          axiomatik
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Hazdaz
          Do you see how ridiculously tall that truck is? The sides of the bed are above his shoulders! How useful, he can barely even see into it.
          TrueDat
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Hazdaz
          @ Hazdaz because it's an insignificant statistic, considering that fleet average in general have increased roughly 400 lbs. also, due to more strict safety regulations, almost all of that weight can be attributed to building safer, stronger structures. so there really isn't any point in mentioning a spec that as affected almost every vehicle class out there. and, it's not just trucks that have gained wight and become taller. take a look at the full size car segment, where cars like the Taurus and Avalon have packed on 500 lbs since the 90's as well, not to mention, an overall larger, and taller car.
      Dark Gnat
      • 2 Years Ago
      Remember when you could get tucks with a *stepside* bed? I wish they would bring them back.
      jacqueline
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'll buy one
      Jonathan Wayne
      • 2 Years Ago
      I like it, cool idea.
      flyingfortresb17
      • 2 Years Ago
      That is cool. Too bad that was not invented earlier. Gonna be a money maker for the man.
      gleam1946
      • 2 Years Ago
      Good design, Hope you make money and employ many American citizens.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      AndreNeves
      • 2 Years Ago
      http://www.pickupspecialties.com/tailgate_stuff/tailgate_ladder_tailgate_step_REL_Stapleton.html
        AndreNeves
        • 2 Years Ago
        @AndreNeves
        Btw, going to invent a cool little device that you can stick headphones into and will allow you to store thousands of songs for listening. It's going to have a little screen on it too so you can easily select your music.
      Brett Bertrand
      • 2 Years Ago
      Oh dude, what if the steps are wet when you come down from the tailgate and nut check yourself? Ouch!
        d.hollywood
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Brett Bertrand
        Thanx for that visual. I had to watch it again to see what you were talking about.Yep...either pad it...or have the anchor stud be flush with the gate.
      NamorF-Pro
      • 2 Years Ago
      Brilliant idea! But this is just gonna make people lazier and fatter. Very American that is...
        TrueDat
        • 2 Years Ago
        @NamorF-Pro
        or maybe it will reduce stress on an older man's back and knee joints..
        Rob
        • 2 Years Ago
        @NamorF-Pro
        What an assenine statement. Reduce potential for injury and promote mobility for all = stupid, lazy, fat. You're a cynical smacktard.
      Dallas
      • 2 Years Ago
      We rednecks just leave the tailgate up and step into the bed using the "bumper". We get out the same way. DUH!!!!
        porsha993
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dallas
        Exactly. Or if a trailer is in the way, such as my enclosed goose-neck car hauler, I just step on the tire and go over the side of the bed. Important to keep in mind, Ford has a 300 pound limit on the tailgate. I'm pretty sure that's a limit on the hinges and the cables, not the gate itself. You can see in the video that this guy had to weld a bunch of steel inside the tailgate to act as a track and anchor for his step. Add all that hardware to the weight of the person and whatever they might be carrying and you just may be over the safe limit. Fords are built like tanks so it probably won't ever be a problem but you never know.
        jokinok1
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dallas
        That's the way I have been doing it for years.
        LARRY
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dallas
        Hell I just raise one leg up and put it in the bed. We all rednecks too. Ain't got no tail gate to let down so we go over the side.
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