The Renault-Nissan Alliance, along with the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP), produced a two-minute video to coincide with the Rio+20 environmental conference that pitches the sister companies' advances in plug-in vehicle technology.

The video, which aired on CNBC and can be seen below, waxes poetic about how people "want cars that liberate them from fossil fuels" and reiterates Renault and Nissan's investment of $5 billion in battery-electric vehicle development. Among those interviewed in the video was a California resident that drives "on pure sunshine" because he uses solar power from his home's roof panels to charge up his Nissan Leaf.

Renault and Nissan are hoping such a pitch doesn't fall on deaf ears, at least here in the U.S. Earlier this month, Nissan reported that June sales of the Leaf dropped 69 percent from a year earlier to 535 units. Through the first six months of the year, Leaf sales fell 19 percent to 3,148 vehicles. Nissan has said sales will pick up once domestic production of the Leaf starts up at Nissan's Smyrna, Tennessee plant later this year.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 9 Comments
      American Refugee
      • 1 Day Ago
      I'm glad something came out of the sad disaster that was Rio+20.
      goodoldgorr
      • 1 Day Ago
      It cost few to add a range extender in these battery electric cars and that few added cost add a huge selling advantage to the car. Look at the volt vs leaf sale differential . People don't want to move backward, this is something green aficionado do not understand. Just half hearted half brained theory won't push people to forget unlimited range offered by pure gasoline cars and make a switch to a costlier car that go few miles, need arduous no nonsense recharge. If there is a range extender, it add just few cost and erase the range and refueling problem. To date there is just the volt that offer this and even if it sale at a higher price then the leaf or imiev, it sale more. What they can do is to offer a hydrogen range extender. I calculated that it add few cost because you can reduce the battery size and all the car remain electric. They should begin commercialisation in the los-angeles area for a hydrogen infrastructure and also they could include a small integrated hydrogen maker fit directly into the electric car and bypass the problem of having to stop for fuel for 5 minutes each 400 miles. Also as there is much electricity this sheme apply to trucks, trains, aircrafts, etc. After that the problem become a space problen because there won't be enouph roads and airports because the machineries become way cheaper so everyone will but many and do much miles, LOL.
        Chris M
        • 1 Day Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        Gorr, gasoline doesn't offer "unlimited range" because they have to stop to fill up. But a powered roadway would offer truly unlimited range for BEVs, as they could get power while traveling. The problem with a "integrated hydrogen maker" is that it takes lots of energy to run it, either electrical or chemical. It would be more efficient and give better range to use that energy directly, instead of using that energy to run a hydrogen maker, using that hydrogen to power a fuel cell that runs an electric motor.
          DaveMart
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Chris M
          @Marco: 'As for a 'powered roadway', such a concept may sound brilliant in a 1950's 'Futuristic' edition of 'Popular Mechanics', but is logistically absurd. ' Contact Oak Ridge immediately! Those dumbo's don't have your level of technical expertise!
          Marco Polo
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Chris M
          Chris M Gorr's views may (well, are) be pretty eccentric, but your reply is equally so ! The Volt is outselling Leaf because at the present time EREV's have proved more acceptable than pure EV's. As for a 'powered roadway', such a concept may sound brilliant in a 1950's 'Futuristic' edition of 'Popular Mechanics', but is logistically absurd. I'm not a big fan of Hydrogen either, but outside of the US, some very big corporations have very serious investments and equally serious scientists developing FCV technology. I wouldn't dismiss the technology so lightly.
        porosavuporo
        • 1 Day Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        "I calculated that it add few cost." So you are already practicing adding and subtraction, but have not started with grammar yet ? Have no fear though, summer is shortly over and third grade should get you going with that.
          porosavuporo
          • 1 Day Ago
          @porosavuporo
          Except that english is not my first language ( should be obvious )
          Marco Polo
          • 1 Day Ago
          @porosavuporo
          @ porosavuporo When you are as fluent in your first language as Gorr is in his second, you may not be so patronizing !
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 1 Day Ago
      Renault/Nissan, you might try low weight and aerodynamics. just a thought...