It often seems that cars worth millions of dollars are kept under lock and key in climate-controlled garages, never to see the open road. Christopher Cox's 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO is not one of the those cars. The American investor drives the car, one of just 39 built, regularly and has participated in numerous events around the world since he purchased it in 2005. In fact, we've seen the brightly colored 250 GTO, worth an estimated $30+ million, in person no less than five times including last summer in Monterey where it was entered in the Pebble Beach Tour and Concours d'Elegance.

Of course, driving a car always comes with the chance of an accident, and unfortunately that's just what happened when Cox recently had the 250 GTO out on track as part of the model's 50th anniversary tour in France last week. Details of the extent of the accident are scarce, but the off-track excursion at the Reims-Gueux race track was bad enough that his wife broke her leg on impact.

We wish a speedy recovery to both Christopher and his wife, and we're sure the car will up and running in no time. Hopefully we'll see it back in action in the near future.

You can see our photos of Cox's 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO at various events in the gallery below.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 54 Comments
      scott3
      • 2 Years Ago
      As Nick Mason stated when asked about drving his GTO daily or in races. He simply put "If man built it and man can repair it." With the way things are today I have seen cars burnt, crashed and crushed and they were brought back to like new condition. If one has the means for a car of this nature odds are they can afford to repair it. if not the crushed car could still be sold for millions. If it were not for people like this I would have never had a chance to enjoy seeing history like this outside of a museum. More power to him and a fast recovery for his wife.
      Jonathan Wayne
      • 2 Years Ago
      No shame in an accident doing what it is supposed to do. I hope he and his wife are okay.
      Frisky_Dingo
      • 2 Years Ago
      No better way for it to have gone out.
      Xedicon
      • 2 Years Ago
      Definitely hope the Mr. and Mrs. recover quickly and fully. I must admit I give this man huge credit for keeping this baby out on the road. Hopefully the damage isn't too bad and the car will recover as well.
      Drakkon
      • 2 Years Ago
      Unless consumed by fire, most things created by human hands can be repaired by human hands. The value may be harder to fix. To call Riems-Geaux a 'racetrack' is like calling a deep path a highway. Riems was and is a loose assortment of French country roads.
      Kip
      • 2 Years Ago
      As much as I don't like to hear about the accident, I commend the guy for not letting the car waste away in a garage (climate controlled or not).
      Carac
      • 2 Years Ago
      Best wishes to them both on recovery. Driving a Ferrari, especially old ones, takes equal measure skill and balls. He appears to have the cajones since he took a 30 million dollar Ferrari on a track...he just needs some more skill, assuming the car was mechanically good. I know the first thing on my to-do list after recovering would be more track time in a more expendable car, he can afford the lessons.
      David
      • 2 Years Ago
      These cars are history of a sports car industry. That's why the price is so high.
      gtv4rudy
      • 2 Years Ago
      Ever try to buy a famous painting by Van Gogh, Picasso? This is the same thing except it has wheels.
        Dean
        • 2 Years Ago
        @gtv4rudy
        This car is far more beautiful than the painting...
          gtv4rudy
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dean
          I agree. I just don't get how some people pay over a hundred million dollars for art work that I wouldn't hang in my basement.
          Tom
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dean
          Yes, but you can't fully enjoy the car for its intended purpose simply by looking at it.
      Randy
      • 2 Years Ago
      It's always a shame to see a good car get damaged! Oh and I hope his wife heals up too!
      Carbon Fibre
      • 2 Years Ago
      I don;t understand. Some here yell out, that cars are meant to be driven, even though their rare exotics, yet they complain when it gets crashed? I blame the stupid driver but it's one or the other if it hurts you an exotic being damaged.
      Renaurd
      • 2 Years Ago
      Anyone that pays $30 million for a car is too stupid to drive,.......I'm sick of super wealthy people.
        Drakkon
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Renaurd
        Is it a car or a sculpture?
        breakfastburrito
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Renaurd
        money is an idea. just an idea. $30,000,000.00 bills were not collected or exchanged. You hate an idea. I don't disagree. Don't get confused, and start hating people (who are all equal and valuable).
        high.speed
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Renaurd
        Nothing wrong with someone spending their money in what they like, in this case a car(gee, I wonder if anyone on Autoblog would relate!)that happens to be one of only 39 in existence. If anything I'm surprised he's actually driving it, this guy wins in my book.
        Xedicon
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Renaurd
        Somehow, and this is just a hunch mind you, I think that Mr. Cox is a very smart man whatever his personality may be. In most cases you don't find yourself in a position to buy a 30 million dollar car by being a dumbass.
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