A British company is working on a new navigation system that doesn't rely on GPS satellites to track your location. BAE has created Navsop, a device that picks up errant cell phone, radio and television signals to deduce your coordinates, which means it can be used in locations where traditional GPS can't. For example, TV signals are substantially more powerful in buildings and below ground than GPS, which means Navsop could eventually help locate individuals in collapsed buildings or mines. It could also be instrumental in locating stolen vehicles stashed in underground parking garages.

BAE claims that while Navsop is still in the early stages of development, it will eventually fit into a gadget about the size of a standard coin. At present, however, Navsop resides in a massive box that must be lugged around in a car and attached to a whip antenna. Not exactly smartphone compatible.

Navsop isn't entirely independent from GPS, however. The system must first get its bearings from the satellites in the sky before turning to radio signals.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 19 Comments
      Mark Mason
      • 2 Years Ago
      What amazes me is I'm 60 years old and got to this old age without the nesseaty of a GPS or any such idems other than a paper map once in a while. But I guess if the direction you look is down at a hand held whatever you probably need this sort of stuff
        Nemebean
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Mark Mason
        I'm not 60, but I also spent some time driving with nothing but paper maps. I got lost a lot, and spent more time looking at my paper maps while driving than I should have. Despite its well-documented flaws, GPS has been an improvement in every way.
          themechanicsix
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Nemebean
          So long as you wanna risk your life on batteries. Everyone should use these devices this is true but if you RELY one one then you need help.
      schnellsalem
      • 2 Years Ago
      I cant wait till the system crashes and nobody knows how to read a map lol
      Spies1
      • 2 Years Ago
      Isn't that how the navigation systems on the iPod Touch work.
        MachDelta
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Spies1
        The iPod Touch doesn't have a GPS receiver, it's mapping features are limited to an actual WiFi connection.
      john m
      • 2 Years Ago
      As the Brits would say, "BRILLIANT!"
      Maryann
      • 2 Years Ago
      Mapquest apps on a cell phone make a GPS obsolete
      Inventor
      • 2 Years Ago
      Apparently they aren;t aware that TV broadcasting is a thing of the past. TV is almost exclusively by cable, at least in the U.S.
      Garry Carlson
      • 2 Years Ago
      Every electrical appliance I have ever purchased comes with a "Federal Warning" that this appliance must not give off interference, but must accept interference. Now your saying that's all about to change? Good Luck with that!
      themechanicsix
      • 2 Years Ago
      So in other words it's like our existing cell phones.
      RSS007
      • 2 Years Ago
      Yes. BAE!
      rrmedenwald
      • 2 Years Ago
      HOW BOUT UNDER H20?
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      kjasperkc
      • 2 Years Ago
      I prefer living free of all the stuff. Paper maps are fine and an updated road atlas.....
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