At least one person – a New York Times reviewer – has found that the Coda Sedan gets pretty impressive mileage out of a single charge. The tester reported reaching almost 110 miles on a single charge during a test drive.

The Coda was driven on a 79-mile round trip on one day, and had almost 20 percent of its battery power left over, and was driven 103 miles the following day, with "a few miles" worth of battery charge remaining, the Times reported. The Sedan had consistently better range than the Nissan Leaf the reviewer was leasing, though the car lacks amenities such as keyless entry, cruise control and a push-button starter.

The EPA in March estimated the Coda would get 88 miles on a single charge, the longest outside of Tesla Motors and 14 miles more than the Leaf. The Sedan was also given a 73-miles-per-gallon-equivalent rating.

Coda sold its first Sedans in March and opened its Los Angeles headquarters late last year.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 34 Comments
      Dave
      • 2 Years Ago
      So, the Coda, at 73 mpg equivalent is 30% less fuel efficient than a Focus BEV (105 MPGe) and 26% less fuel efficient than a Leaf (99 MPGe) and 18% less fuel efficient than a Tesla Model S.
        Spec
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dave
        Yeah, there is definitely something bad going on in their drivetrain. The car should really not be that inefficient.
      PR
      • 2 Years Ago
      These results really aren't that surprising. The official EPA range number is created by taking the actual observed testing results, and then deducting 30% from the actual results to give a range estimate that factors in lots of things that things that are known to reduce range. Wind, bad weather, heat, cold, speeding, etc. These results just means they successfully avoided or minimized these factors. Here is how Coda's EPA range was calculated: "EPA’s rated combined range of 88 miles is calculated using CODA’s range of 133.6 (city) and 116.1 (highway) achieved in tests with certain weights and adjustments: EPA combined range of 88 miles = (UDDS “city cycle” test of 133.6 miles weighted at 55% + HFET “highway cycle” test of 116.1 miles weighted at 45%) x 70% to offset for variable driving cycles, styles and temperatures." http://www.codaautomotive.com/electric-vehicle-blog/coda-still-top-of-the-epa-ev-range-heap-4/ Under these same conditions, the Leaf would likely be a 100+ mile range vehicle too.
      Spec
      • 2 Years Ago
      Coda gets a lot of grief but they do give you a big battery for a reasonable price. If this car had the name plate of a major automaker on it, it might be doing better than the Leaf right now.
        PR
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Spec
        I would agree, if it also came with all the modern refinement that the major automakers are putting in their cars these days. The difference in the name plate goes deeper than just the skin according to the second page of the New York Times review. This year Coda is supposed to start selling a second version of this car with approx. 20% more range at a price that is supposed to be less than 7% higher than this version. It will be interesting to see if that even longer range will do more to close the gap with the majors, despite the refinement issues.
      ev_ftw
      • 2 Years Ago
      They left out cruise control?? That's the single easiest way to boost highway economy...
      DaveMart
      • 2 Years Ago
      Worrying stuff here about Coda: http://www.plugincars.com/coda-encounters-difficulties-after-launching-its-electric-sedan-122904.html 'I mostly focused on problems that average non-EV drivers would readily understand, like the high-pitched whine from the motor that Bob Ostertag—a guy ready to plunk money down to drive off with a Coda—described as the sound a dentist drill makes. Bob heard the sound when he borrowed a Coda from U.C. Davis, where he teaches. When he complained to Coda about the sound, they said it was fixed in the production version. However, despite his best efforts over about six weeks, the Coda dealership in Silicon Valley has not been able to give him a test drive in a production model.' And: 'after several charging events—during my week with the car—my Blink EVSE indicated 37 kilowatt-hours of electricity applied to a 31-kWh battery. Coda engineers would need more info to pinpoint exactly where the losses are coming from—perhaps my Blink charger is not giving an accurate reading—but I can’t help but wonder if the car computer’s monitoring of the battery, even after fully charged, is the reason why about 20 percent more electricity than expected is being pulled from my house to charge the battery pack.' I would not be happy charging something with a high draw which exhibits a ~20% power loss. Not only is it expensive, but the power is going somewhere, and none of the options are good. It seems to me that this may possibly be a real risk. This is an under-engineered product. Steer well clear.
        Marcopolo
        • 14 Hours Ago
        @DaveMart
        Dave Mart "Steer well clear " true words, well spoken !.
      Alexi
      • 2 Years Ago
      Coda is a joke. It functions fine (quality being iffy and amenities lacking), but it fails the great Prius lesson. People don't just want the benefits of the technology, they want a product that makes a statement to onlookers as well. The only statement the Coda makes is "made in china". Too bad because it sounds like it actually works.
        Smoking_dude
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Alexi
        No a lot of ppl, don't want a product that makes a statement. I drive a prius and I don't care. Ppl think that I wan't to make a statement but that is wrong. I got the impression of a normal hatchback. nuff for a lot of ppl. (OH LOOK MY NEW IPAD 4S LOOK HOW GREAT I AM) who needs keyless entry, or a start button? I don't need an app or a fancy start up sound. I used a old fashioned key for years. It it like my dad's Dacia. it is cheap, very practical, lots of space, runs on cheap LPG but lacks luxury features as DVD-Satnav, leather uphostery, or wooden trimmings. dacia sells extremely well, and their cars are based on an old plattform, but the buyers don't care.
          Anne
          • 14 Hours Ago
          @Smoking_dude
          "Look at me driving an el cheapo car" is also a statement. The Prius has long lost the statement it once made. Did you buy one 8-10 years ago or just recently?
          Ronald Wolf
          • 14 Hours Ago
          @Smoking_dude
          Well said Smoking. A lot of people don't care what other people think. Who wants to live a life wondering what some stranger might think of him or his car.
        Ford Future
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Alexi
        I think it looks strange enough to Pass the Prius test.
      Ford Future
      • 2 Years Ago
      What are the characteristics of this battery chemistry?
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ford Future
        The Coda uses lithium iron phosphate chemistry. From Wiki: 'The LiFePO4 battery uses a lithium-ion-derived chemistry and shares many advantages and disadvantages with other Lithium-ion battery chemistries. However, there are significant differences. LFP chemistry offers a longer cycle life than other lithium-ion approaches.[5] The use of phosphates avoids cobalt's cost and environmental concerns, particularly concerns about cobalt entering the environment through improper disposal.[5] LiFePO4 has higher current or peak-power ratings than LiCoO2.[6] The energy density (energy/volume) of a new LFP battery is some 14% lower than that of a new LiCoO2 battery.[7] Also, many brands of LFPs have a lower discharge rate than lead-acid or LiCoO2. Since discharge rate is a percentage of battery capacity a higher rate can be achieved by using a larger battery (more ampère-hours). LiFePO4 cells experience a slower rate of capacity loss (aka greater calendar-life) than lithium-ion battery chemistries such as LiCoO2 cobalt or LiMn2O4 manganese spinel lithium-ion polymer batteries or lithium-ion batteries.[8][9] After one year on the shelf, a LiFePO4 cell typically has approximately the same energy density as a LiCoO2 Li-ion cell, because of LFP's slower decline of energy density. Thereafter, LiFePO4 likely has a higher density.'
          Vlad
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          LiFePO4 is popular in DIY electric bicycle crowd, but apparently it has it's own share of drawbacks, too - none of major EV manufacturers use it. I don't know what the reason is, but I bet it's not pure ignorance.
          Marcopolo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          @Miles Well pointed out. The type of people and organizations involved in the production and marketing of this vehicle, would make anyone cautious of positive endorsements!
          miles
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          DaveMart, I use Wikipedia often, but beware of the (unknown) sources for these articles. The Coda page reads like it was written by a marketing agency, and I would be very leery of any information posted there.
      Marcopolo
      • 2 Years Ago
      Coda has some fans (although not buyer's). Curiously, the Coda seems to have captured endorsements of a group of oddball leftist apologists. I say curious because the vehicle is produced by some of the most extreme examples of organizations and people the left usually loathe. Posters like "American Refugee" and "PR", seem to feel there is a special virtue in Coda's origins in the Peoples Republic of China, and not produced by a major US manufacturer. These posters regularly condemn Fords Focus Electric, on the grounds that it's only a conversion of an existing model, and is unlikely to sell more than 5000 pa, etc . Yet they embrace Coda, despite the fact that it's not only a conversion of an ICE model, but an obsolete PRC copy of a long superseded Japanese model ! Coda is heavily subsidized by it's PRC battery manufacturer, yet the poor build quality is still obvious. This vehicle is built to just comply with the most minimum standards required to pass the US design and safety rules. Despite these cost cutting measures, Coda still isn't cheap or practical. In a market of 8-11 million vehicles annually, almost any vehicle will find some buyers. But a substandard vehicle like Coda is counter-productive to the promotion of the advantages of EV technology. In truth it's just a vehicle produced by a bunch of dubious characters, hoping to capitalize on the gullibility of the DOE and State of California. (The application for massive financing was fortunately refused by the DOA, but Coda are still hopeful of Californian Gov. support) If I were a subscriber, (I'm not) to conspiracy theories like (Dan F, or Ford Future etc) , Coda would make the perfect conspiracy theory! I mean, here's an EV produced by group of investors that includes an, International Oil companies, weapons manufacturers, UN condemned arms dealers, Nat gas and coal corps, several shady Wall street corporate raiders, a disgraced former head of an Oil corp, a battery manufacturer owned by a corporation condemned for environmental and Human rights violations, and other dubious characters, .. With all that money, why such a lacklustre, shoddy vehicle, eh? As Dave Mart wisely advises, stay well clear !
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 2 Years Ago
      so how many have been sold so far?
        Spec
        • 14 Hours Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        I think we can safely assume that Ford has sold more Focus Electrics.
          EZEE
          • 14 Hours Ago
          @Spec
          Mother of God (says while removing glasses slowly)
      American Refugee
      • 2 Years Ago
      Mileage aside, the reviewer gave this car a pass, because of the quality. What's more interesting though is what is happening in the general Chinese automotive market, because quality is improving rapidly. As this article points out, JD Power's China division head is predicting that the Chinese catch up in quality by 2018, and their automotive exports doubled last year due to sales in developing markets: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/06/business/global/valuable-gains-for-china-in-emerging-auto-markets.html That being the case, the Coda is the electric version of the 1988 Hyundai Excel; a cheap, crappy, uninspired car that is the first step for a whole new automotive powerhouse. In this case, an electric one. I still wouldn't have bought an 88 Excel though, and I wouldn't buy a Coda.
        PR
        • 2 Years Ago
        @American Refugee
        AR - Good points. Chinese Quality is what it is because US and European companies who go to China determine how good the quality they want. When Bob from USBobCo decides to offshore manufacturing to China, it is Bob who provides the product specifications, and Bob who pays for the quality checks, and Bob who decides if the quality is at the level that USBobCo has contracted to pay for. It is USBobCo that takes the crap that USBobCo designed to be built as cheap as possible, and puts it in US stores, where we consumers choose to buy it with full knowledge it is cheap crap. We buy cheap crap because it costs less, and we get the exact cheap crap we want to buy, provided by the US company who specified that cheap crap be built in the Chinese factories. It wasn't the Chinese factories who demanded cheap crap. It was us. So what is the point? If you go to China and check out the quality of the products that the Chinese build for their own up-scale sales to their own up-scale consumers, the quality now is already amazing! There is absolutely nothing inherently wrong with Chinese craftsmanship. But US companies aren't willing to pay the price for fine Chinese goods, where higher quality materials and more labor time push the price higher than what US consumers are willing to pay for anything coming from China. The relatively young Chinese auto market will be the same as it matures. If people in the US market end up buying Chinese cars, it will be because people will think they can buy a car made in China for really cheap. That means US dealerships will demand cheaply built cars from China. That means the cars that China exports for the US will start out being cheaply built, because that is exactly what the demand is in the US for Chinese cars. Whether or not Chinese cars follow the path of the Yugo or of the Hyundai is still unknown. I'm betting on Chinese cars following the path of Hyundai and the new Hyundai Elantra, compared to where they were with the 88 Excel.
      lmaoallthetime100
      • 2 Years Ago
      i like coda but the company so small it like they don't exist
      pete.angel
      • 2 Years Ago
      ...and they already have done a couple rounds of layoffs, under the radar. After not paying vendors for the last year, it looks like they are counting on people to not call them out til they can get to a scam IPO.
        Greg Y
        • 14 Hours Ago
        @pete.angel
        by the way, for such a scam company, Great Wall seems pretty interested in them, and Great Wall is among the more respected car companies in China for quality, and has been around for a few years.
        Greg Y
        • 14 Hours Ago
        @pete.angel
        I assume you have some link to that reference about layoffs. Pretty sure if there were layoffs, under the radar or otherwise, people would take notice. They're certainly being watched closely.
          pete.angel
          • 14 Hours Ago
          @Greg Y
          It is very simple for a company of 200 to let go 10-20% of its workforce without calling it a layoff - you trim each department by 1-4 heads doe "performance reasons" and cut the recruiting team down, then just don't refill the positions while leaving them open. That allows even the least talented PR rep to defend the company as stable/growing/whatever spin is needed. It is scary the things they have been able to pull off without any media attention. Not one outlet asked why they would change the size of the battery just months before launch. If I had a car that had sideview mirrors that, say, exploded after impact, I could remove them from my car and sell it as a "streamlined aerodynamic model". Doesn't mean I meant to do that.
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