"The Evora S has 400 Nm of torque which in such a lightweight car is already a healthy figure. But the Evora 414E has two and a half times that amount! The acceleration sensation is almost indescribable, the surge of torque is like an ocean wave!"

So says Simon Corbett, Principal Vehicle Dynamics Test and Development Engineer at Lotus Engineering. Indescribable as it may be, here are some specs: 738 pound-feet of torque (1,000 newton meters), 0-60 in four seconds and a target of 55 grams of carbon dioxide per kilometer.

Making all that possible are two electric motors (one for each rear wheel), a 17 kilowatt-hour lithium polymer battery pack and an alcohol-fueled three-cylinder engine that kicks in when called upon (for instance, after 30 miles of electric-only driving) to recharge the onboard battery. Total range with a topped-up fuel tank and battery is estimated at 300 miles.

We first saw the Lotus Evora 414E at the 2010 Geneva Motor Show, and Lotus has brought its electrified concept back out to play at the Goodwood Festival of Speed. Read more about it in the official press release below.
Show full PR text
LOTUS EVORA 414E HYBRID – IT'S NOW A RUNNER

1000 Nm (738 lbft) of Torque
414 PS (408 hp)
0-60 mph / 97 km/h in around 4 seconds
Top speed 130 mph (209 km/h)
Target emissions of just 55 g CO2 / km (NEDC)

Brimming with innovation, technology, performance and power, the Lotus Evora 414E is a series hybrid technology demonstrator which shows some of the headline technologies that Lotus Engineering, one of the world' s leading automotive engineering consultancies, has within its portfolio.

The Evora 414E is powered by two electric motor packs driving the rear wheels through its Xtrac transmission with a battery pack that can be charged by the Lotus range extender engine or directly from mains electricity. The Lotus 3 cylinder range extender engine has been design protected to run on either gasoline or renewable bio alcohol fuels (methanol and ethanol). It drives an EVO electric generator which produces electrical energy to either charge the battery pack or power the EVO traction motors directly. In normal driving, the Evora 414E will run purely on electricity stored in the battery pack for up to 30 miles (48 km). With the Lotus range extender and the electric traction motors powering the vehicle through an Xtrac 1092 transmission, the Evora 414E is targeted to produce just 55 g of CO2 / km emissions on the Northern European Driving Cycle (NEDC).

Should the driver require more performance, under hard acceleration, for example, the electricity will come from both the battery storage and the small range extender engine.

It's all Torque

Now that the car is undergoing testing, what does 1000 Nm in an Evora feel like?

Simon Corbett, Principal Vehicle Dynamics Test and Development Engineer at Lotus Engineering, has been doing the majority of the development testing, over the last few weeks, "The Evora S has 400 Nm of torque which in such a lightweight car is already a healthy figure. But the Evora 414E has two and a half times that amount! The acceleration sensation is almost indescribable, the surge of torque is like an ocean wave!"

See under the skin of the Evora 414E at the Goodwood Festival of Speed

As part of the REEVolution consortium, funded by the government's innovation agency, the Technology Strategy Board, Lotus will show a cutaway version of the Evora 414E, with the addition of regenerative braking, HALOsonic and realistic 7 speed paddle shift technologies at the Goodwood Festival of Speed, giving an unusual insight into this pioneering vehicle.

About Lotus

Group Lotus plc, is based in Norfolk, UK, and has three operating divisions: Lotus Cars, Lotus Engineering and Lotus Racing.

Lotus Cars builds world class, high performance sports cars including the award-winning Evora, the iconic Elise and the stunning Exige. Lotus New Era, the future product line-up, was unveiled in Paris on 30th September 2010 featuring the new Esprit, Elan, Elite, Elise and Eterne.

Lotus Engineering provides comprehensive and versatile consultancy services to many of the world's OEMs and Tier 1 suppliers and is an internationally recognised automotive engineering consultancy. Global facilities include those in the US, Malaysia, China and offices in Germany and Japan. Lotus is a global high-tech company, committed to driving forward technology for both Lotus Cars and its Engineering clients, spearheading research into such areas as hybrids, electric vehicles and renewable fuels.

Lotus Racing (formerly Lotus Motorsport) operates the motorsports activities of Lotus and includes the strategy to return the Lotus name to a great number of series including endurance racing with GT2, GT4 and LMP2, single seater racing with GP2, GP3 and IndyCar. Lotus also competes in Formula 1 with the Lotus F1 Team, racing in the iconic Black and Gold livery.

About the REEVolution consortium

Evolution of REEV Technologies Building a UK Supply Base is a collaborative R&D project funded by the Technology Strategy Board that is creating new high performance Range Extended Electric Vehicles (REEV) and Plug-in Hybrids Electric Vehicles (PHEV). Three new demonstrator vehicles will showcase innovative new technologies. The cars combine and build on the skills of all of the businesses involved. The driving force behind this is to build a UK supply chain for new ultra low carbon vehicle technologies and position suppliers so that they can exploit the global market. The REEVolution consortium, led by Jaguar Land Rover, consists of: Axeon Technologies Ltd, EVO Electric Ltd and Xtrac Limited; and three vehicle manufacturers: Jaguar Land Rover, Lotus and Nissan Motor Company Ltd. for INFINITI brand.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 76 Comments
      Anne
      • 2 Years Ago
      All this torque boasting going on here. Mine is bigger than yours! Some are making it a sport. Well, motor torque says nothing if you don't know the reduction gear. It's torque at the wheels that matter, not torque at the drive shaft of your motor.
        PeterScott
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Anne
        Yes. Torque is easily fungible through gearing. Horsepower is what actually governs performance.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Anne
        Anne, The electric traction motors powering the vehicle through Xtrac 1092 transmissions. The company [www.xtrac.com] is involved in: Formula One, Rally, IndyCar, Sportscar, GT, Touring Cars and Moto GP, being just some of the sectors which benefit from Xtrac’s quality, performance and reliability... Xtrac was selected primarily because of its involvement in the REEVolution project, which is a collaborative research and development programme funded by the government's [UK] innovation agency, the Technology Strategy Board; designed to create new high performance range extended electric vehicles (REEV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV). So, presumably they know something about how to put the total system torque of 1,000 N·m (738 lb-ft); and the power of 414 PS (408 hp). on the road to reach the 414E acceleration of 0-60 mph in around 4 seconds: And the real life experience: "The Evora S has 400 Nm of torque which in such a lightweight car is already a healthy figure. But the Evora 414E has two and a half times that amount! The acceleration sensation is almost indescribable, the surge of torque is like an ocean wave!" Meanwhile using approx. an average of 99.21 mpg (2.37 l/100km) gas (only when in range extended mode!) thus, I think it should be pretty satisfactory for most people (including even the most environmental conscious).
          Letstakeawalk
          • 2 Years Ago
          "LTAW: I don't know if you are saying to copy and paste into google, but in any case any paraphrasing at all would presumably throw the search out." I'll clarify: If you copy and paste a directly quoted passage into Google - it will return the original source as one of the top links. So, providing a URL to that website is nice, but not required. If someone paraphrases a quote in their comment, copy/pasting into Google won't work. In that case, the person doing the paraphrasing should necessarily provide a URL to their source.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 2 Years Ago
          Large blocks of copy/pasta text are very easy to source - just highlight the text, and search for it. It's when people quote a specific figure or number or other detail, and when they take it out of context (not in a bad way - just meaning when they paraphrase instead of quoting directly) that it becomes difficult to find the original source. When paraphrasing someone else, you should always document it with a link, IMHO, but a direct quote is a little less vital.
          • 2 Years Ago
          Dave, It's my original reply below to you, skierpage, Smoking_dude and Peter Scott. It is a simple conversion from the target CO2 emission to an approximate fuel consumption (using the quoted website): My reply: "Calculating an approximate fuel consumption from the target emissions of just 55 g CO2 / km (NEDC) - using unitjuggler.com - the result is: 55 g/km CO2 = 99.21 mpg (2.37 l/100km) Which is not too bad ;) for a sports car with 1000 Nm (738 lbft) of Torque / 414 PS (408 hp)." http://www.unitjuggler.com/convert-fuelconsumption-from-gperkmgasoline-to-mpg.html
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Kris: I doubt your calculations. I don't know the full details of the NEDC cycle, but the CO2 emissions are normally taken as some sort of combination of the EV range and the petrol range. You can't, AFAIK, simply assume that those are the emissions after the battery has done it's bit so they represent the emissions when the petrol engine is running.
          Anne
          • 2 Years Ago
          @krisztiant, You completely missed my point. The pedigree of the gearbox has nothing to do with it. It is the gear ratio. That reduces the torque available at the wheels, where the rubber meets the road. Even the best manufacturers can't escaped the laws of physics.
          • 2 Years Ago
          Dave, That's why I wrote: "Calculating an APPROXIMATE fuel consumption from the target emissions of just 55 g CO2 / km..." since we don't have hard data on it yet. But the point is: The power-train is the result of a brand new research project for high performance range extended electric vehicles (REEV) for the purpose of making this outstanding result possible. And don't forget: this is a sports car with a performance comparable that of the Ferraris, so this APPROXIMATE fuel consumption is outstanding and even if the final hard data will be a little bit different, It just makes no real difference at all.
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          Kris, I love the Lotus RE, but I agree with Peter. The assumptions behind your calculations are in error, and so they are not even approximately right. Just like the estimates of petrol consumption in the Volt, they come up with some weird mpg estimate overall based on some mile in EV mode and some not, and do not simply show nil emissions under EV and a separate figure when the motor is running. So your assumptions are, I believe, flawed. You can't turn out even approximate figures that way.
          • 2 Years Ago
          Dave, Anne Here's one more fuel economy estimate [Lotus 414E]] - not too different from my simple conversion - what you are also allowed to not agree, but that's all we have: "We do not have any estimations when it comes to fuel consumption but with this combination it should be between 60 and 70 mpg or 3.5 to 4 liters per 100 km" http://electriccar2013.com/lotus-evora-414e-hybrid-2013/ If you have any better estimates / guesses, please don't hesitate to let us know it. Anne, "You completely missed my point... It is the gear ratio... Even the best manufacturers can't escaped the laws of physics." Actually, I didn't miss your point, we just simply don't know the gear ratio. And what would change if we knew it. Do we really have to know it? What we do  know is this: "The acceleration sensation is almost indescribable, the surge of torque is like an ocean wave!" Looks like the engineers didn't "escape the laws of physics" and already put enough torque "where the rubber meets the road" and that's what the people - who actually will buy this car - only want to know.
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          As far as I can see4 there is nothing at all on GCC about this critical passage: 'Meanwhile using approx. an average of 99.21 mpg (2.37 l/100km) gas (only when in range extended mode!) ' LTAW: I don't know if you are saying to copy and paste into google, but in any case any paraphrasing at all would presumably throw the search out.
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Kris; Thanks for the quote, but PLEASE provide links when you do so! I can possibly dig it out, but it is all so much simpler if you do so yourself, and that also applies to your earlier post, apparently from the Lotus website. Many thanks.
          • 2 Years Ago
          Dave, Right. Actually, in this case, looks like Green Car Congress has the most insight into the topic (than we can find on Lotus' website). Yours, http://www.greencarcongress.com/2012/07/414e-20120701.html
        PeterScott
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Anne
        @krisztiant "Meanwhile using approx. an average of 99.21 mpg (2.37 l/100km) gas (only when in range extended mode!)" You almost certainly have this part wrong. The 99 MPG will include some number of charge cycles, like the Volts overall number. Using a range extender in pure series mode, it will be a challenge to even achieve 50MPG in RE mode, more likely it is closer to 40MPG in RE mode.
          PeterScott
          • 2 Years Ago
          @PeterScott
          You are correct it isn't like the Volt. The Volt set up is better Range Extender efficiency, because it has a mechanical connection to the wheels, precisely to increase efficiency. They didn't add that extra bit of complexity for nothing, they did it because pure series RE has significant losses. There is no escaping physics. A pure Series Hybrid takes an efficiency hit in RE mode. Even worse with a series hybrid that only has two RPM settings and will rely on charge/discharge cycles from the battery. The Lotus might have a slightly more efficient ICE, but they will lose that in having a less efficient connection to the wheels. So in the end I would expect a very Volt like RE MPG. But we will likely never know, because this isn't a production vehicle. But this is definitely not 99 MPG in RE mode.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @PeterScott
          @Peter Scott The Lotus series hybrid (called: REEV) power train has nothing to do that of the Volt's. The Lotus Evora 414E plug-in hybrid has a very small and simple (2 or 3 cylinder) range extender engine specifically designed in a collaborative research and development programme [REEVolution project]; to create new high performance range extended electric vehicles (REEV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV). Thus, the power-train is the result of a brand new research project for high performance range extended electric vehicles (REEV) for the purpose of making this outstanding result possible. Don't compare this to the Volt or even to the Fisker Karma et al., since it is just simply pointless.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @PeterScott
          And again: Please explain your remarkable ideas to the engineers involved in the development of the Lotus Evora 414E plug-in hybrid. And don't forget: this is a sports car with a performance comparable that of the Ferraris (not the Volts, Fiskers etc.) so this APPROXIMATE fuel consumption is outstanding and even if the final hard data will be a little bit different, It just makes no real difference at all. As you are just repeating the same stereotypes defending the Volt as a true 'fanboi' I leave you now at that activity. Have a nice day!
      • 2 Years Ago
      And to resolve the debate on the series hybrids' efficiency: Here's an incredibly efficient existing series hybrid car with the specs of: 640 horsepower 3000Nm total torque 0-60mph in 3.7 seconds (Ferrari territory) Mileage: around 80mpg Range: 1000 miles (1500 kilometres) between recharges or visits to the petrol station And all it needs to achieve this outstanding result: "... a very small, lightweight 250cc four stroke engine to power a highly-efficient electrical generator..." "The 640 bhp MINI QED plug-in EV" "Similarly, so that the car can drive a significant distance, PML has used a very small, lightweight 250cc four stroke engine to power a highly-efficient electrical generator. The engine is run at a continuous speed and load, which results in optimum efficiency fuel conversion. After delivering the energy to the battery system the mileage translates to around 80mpg and gives the QED a range of 1000 miles (1500 kilometres) between recharges or visits to the petrol station. Driving it without the generator offers a still healthy (by EV standards) range of 200-250 miles (350 to 420 km depending on how much of a leadfoot the driver is)." http://www.gizmag.com/go/6104/ Series hybrids are seriously efficient, if they are well done. #efficientserieshybrids
      Neil Blanchard
      • 2 Years Ago
      A real serial / series hybrid -- cool! What is the fuel tank capacity; and/or what is the MPG's during charging mode? Can the genset charge the battery in less time than it takes to discharge it; even with the car moving? Neil
        PeterScott
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Neil Blanchard
        There already is a real series Hybrid: The Fisker Karma. Unfortunately Series Hybrids aren't the most efficient when running on gas due to higher loses in Motor/Generator/Charging/Discharging cycles.
          PeterScott
          • 2 Years Ago
          @PeterScott
          You are misunderstanding the PR. The 55g emission number is their overall target, including Battery power + gas, like the overall Volt number. This is not a Range Extender number. They will be lucky to get 40 MPG out RE mode.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @PeterScott
          @Peter Scott Please explain your remarkable ideas to the engineers involved in the development of the Lotus Evora 414E plug-in hybrid. As you are just repeating the same stereotypes defending the Volt as a true 'fanboi' I leave you now at that activity.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @PeterScott
          @Peter Scott It's only true, when they are not done right (with real range extenders, specific electronics, transmissions etc.). Lotus Evora 414E plug-in hybrid (in range extender mode!): 55 g/km CO2 ≅ 99.21 mpg (2.37 l/100km) And it can be used as a BEV too. What is your problem Peter?
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Neil Blanchard
        @Peter Scott I just repeat here my previous reply to you above (as you are just repeating yourself endlessly): The Lotus series hybrid (called: REEV) power train has nothing to do that of the Volt's. The Lotus Evora 414E plug-in hybrid has a very small and simple (2 or 3 cylinder) range extender engine specifically designed in a collaborative research and development programme [REEVolution project]; to create new high performance range extended electric vehicles (REEV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV). Thus, the power-train is the result of a brand new research project for high performance range extended electric vehicles (REEV) for the purpose of making this outstanding result possible. Don't compare this to the Volt or even to the Fisker Karma et al., since it is just simply pointless.
          PeterScott
          • 2 Years Ago
          My repeating myself, is mostly just correcting your incredibly faulty assumption that this car would get 99 MPG in RE mode, when it is clearly the overall number including battery cycles. There is zero info about the efficiency of RE mode given. They may pull another 5% out of the ICE, but they will lose about 5% from not having a mechanical connection to the wheels (this is more efficient than Gen/Motor conversion). So at best we could expect 2 or 3 MPG more than the Volt.
          • 2 Years Ago
          Marco: "The comparison between Volt or Karma and the Evora S, is interesting, but pointless." Exactly that's what I was explaining in considerable length. "The Evora S is a vehicle built without regard to cost as a technical exercise..." Not really: "Lotus has begun testing of its Evora 414E plug-in series hybrid technology demonstrator..." which means it is now beyond its prototype stage and though no date has been set as far as production, but "Lotus plans to offer the range extender in both 3- and 2-cylinder versions, with output of 50 kW, 35 kW and 20 kW.)" Thus, Lotus definitely plans to sell it, as they cannot afford playing - and spending huge chunks of money - on a nice idea just for some fun. "The other two are production, 4 door models intended to sell in sufficient numbers to return a profit to the manufacturer." That's exactly how [i.e. like Lotus] technology eventually trickles down to mainstream vehicles (from expensive sports cars and the motor sports itself). And it's a good thing even for the Volts, Fiskers et al. #letitbe
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Peter Scott Now I just reiterate my answer above to you: Please explain your remarkable ideas to the engineers involved in the development of the Lotus Evora 414E plug-in hybrid. As you are just repeating the same stereotypes defending the Volt as a true 'fanboi' I leave you now at that activity.
          Marcopolo
          • 2 Years Ago
          krisztiant Agreed !
          • 2 Years Ago
          And as a bonus answer: And don't forget: this is a sports car with a performance comparable that of the Ferraris (not the Volts, Fiskers etc.) so this APPROXIMATE fuel consumption is outstanding and even if the final hard data will be a little bit different, It just makes no real difference at all. Have a nice day!
          Marcopolo
          • 2 Years Ago
          krisztiant The comparison between Volt or Karma and the Evora S, is interesting, but pointless. The Evora S is a vehicle built without regard to cost as a technical exercise. The other two are production, 4 door models intended to sell in sufficient numbers to return a profit to the manufacturer.
      Nick
      • 2 Years Ago
      Handsome car, excellent drivetrain. The Lotus is an ideal car for hybrid / ev tech: -It's featherlight.
      • 2 Years Ago
      For the sake of accuracy: ABG: "...an alcohol-fueled three-cylinder engine..." Lotus: "The Lotus 3 cylinder range extender engine has been design protected to run on either gasoline or renewable bio alcohol fuels (methanol and ethanol)." But, what is even more important IMHO: "The engine is optimized to generate power at engine speeds between 1,500 and 3,500 rpm allowing a lightweight simple 2 valve per cylinder engine architecture and eliminating the need for a complex 4 valve per cylinder design." Or even: "(Lotus plans to offer the range extender in both 3- and 2-cylinder versions, with output of 50 kW, 35 kW and 20 kW.)" But, iIf you thought it's too weak, mind you: Total system torque is 1,000 N·m (738 lb-ft); As a comparison, the 2010 Tesla Roadster featured torque of 400 N·m for the Sport model; the four synchronous motors in the coming Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG E-CELL are currently targeted to deliver 880 N·m of torque. It simply beats even the most powerful sports BEV competitions to hell. Thus, the engine is a REAL range extender (developed specifically for this purpose), which can be way simpler, smaller, lighter and even cheaper than an engine, which was designed for more complex traction purposes. "The generator supplied by Fagor Automation is driven directly off the crankshaft to reduce weight, package size and cost." And the generator too. Interestingly: The car has a simulated paddle shift gear change offering ultra quick gear changes reminiscent of a dual clutch transmission... - And its advantage: While many electric and hybrid vehicles provide engine braking, this is generally at a fixed rate or pre-selected rate. In some driving situations this can either be too aggressive, slowing the vehicle unnecessarily, or too light, requiring additional braking application... [and also] ...the simulation of engine braking can be selected for greater driving involvement or switched off for more relaxed driving... Cool. And with the two electric motor packs driving the rear wheels, it can eliminate lots of mechanical parts, replacing them with light and flexible electronics. That's how PHEVs, or in this case, REEVs (Range Extended Electric Vehicles) should be designed to be way more successful and enjoyable.
        • 2 Years Ago
        Calculating an approximate fuel consumption from the target emissions of just 55 g CO2 / km (NEDC) - using unitjuggler.com - the result is: 55 g/km CO2 = 99.21 mpg (2.37 l/100km) Which is not too bad ;) for a sports car with 1000 Nm (738 lbft) of Torque / 414 PS (408 hp). http://www.unitjuggler.com/convert-fuelconsumption-from-gperkmgasoline-to-mpg.html Dave. Incidentally, the engine is optimized to generate power at engine speeds [anywhere] between 1,500 and 3,500 rpm [as needed], thus, not only "at one of two fixed speeds". But, on the other hand: the simulated paddle shift gear change does provide the driver with several fixed virtual gear selections and - just to get a glimpse of how it actually works - here it is: The... simulated paddle shift gear change offering ultra quick gear changes reminiscent of a dual clutch transmission. This enhances the driver interaction with the vehicle and provides a driving experience similar to current internal combustion engine high performance sports cars. The Evora 414E Hybrid uses a column mounted paddle shift to simulate the gear change and a synthesized engine sound changes frequency with virtual gear selection. The drive torque is also modulated to simulate a physical feeling of a gearshift jolt. The virtual gearshift simulation, like a conventional gearbox, is used to change the driving characteristics and response of the vehicle. This offers the driver the ability to control the vehicle deceleration by simulating engine braking through a virtual downshift in gears. Unlike true engine braking, the Lotus system does not dissipate the energy of the moving vehicle through internal engine friction but uses the electric motors to regenerate the energy back into the battery. While many electric and hybrid vehicles provide engine braking, this is generally at a fixed rate or pre-selected rate. In some driving situations this can either be too aggressive, slowing the vehicle unnecessarily, or too light, requiring additional braking application. The Lotus system effectively allows the driver to select the appropriate level of regeneration by simulating stepping down by one, two or even three gears. The simulation of engine braking through both the gear noise change and the retardation of the vehicle is fully intuitive to a driver familiar with a conventional gearbox, according to Lotus. The simulated gear change capability can be selected for greater driving involvement or switched off for more relaxed driving. Just cool.
        skierpage
        • 2 Years Ago
        The Volt range-extender is a 1.0L 3-cylinder turbocharged coupled to a 53 kW generator. Lotus offers a flex-fuel 3-cylinder engine producing 50 kW. Without a production car we just have to take Lotus' assurances that it will be simpler and lighter. Lotus doesn't seem to be claiming it will be more fuel efficient, but if it's only for occasional trips beyond the 30 mile range, perhaps size and weight are more important. I wish Lotus all the best, but it's disheartening seeing all the innovative prototypes coming out of the UK that don't make it to production: this, Gordon Murray Designs t.25 and t.27, PML Flightlink (now Protean) in-wheel motors, Lightning GT, etc. I can't wait for the Ford, Honda Accord, and VW PHEVs. No, I have to wait, they're drifting later into 2013!
          PeterScott
          • 2 Years Ago
          @skierpage
          @daveMart Using your engine to charge batteries is the opposite of efficient. There is a reason the Volt doesn't use this method and actually doesn't use pure serial hybrid either, but has a mechanical connection to the wheels to increase efficiency. Losses from driving wheels with an ICE: Traditional Drivetrain: 10%-15% (FWD mechanical losses) Serial hybrid ~20% (Generator/E-Motor/Controller losses) Serial Hybrid + battery charge/discharge. ~30% These losses swamp any tiny increment you might get from running the engine at steady state.
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @skierpage
          With an engine optimised to run at one of two fixed speeds to charge the battery, and few cylinders to reduce friction, I can't imagine any way this is not ultra fuel efficient. I agree that it is a shame that their engineering seems delayed in making it out and into production models.
          Smoking_dude
          • 2 Years Ago
          @skierpage
          The Volt has a 1.4-liter 4-cylinder engine with 63 kW (to propel the car and charge the battery)
      • 2 Years Ago
      As my simple fuel economy conversion [Lotus 414E] from the official CO2 emissions target data to mpg (l/100km) raised many-many questions, here's a new one (pretty close to my simple conversion) from a media outlet, which naturally anyone allowed to also not agree with: "We do not have any estimations when it comes to fuel consumption but with this combination it should be between 60 and 70 mpg or 3.5 to 4 liters per 100 km" http://electriccar2013.com/lotus-evora-414e-hybrid-2013/ As a reminder, here's my previous simple conversion: 55 g/km CO2 = 99.21 mpg (2.37 l/100km) http://www.unitjuggler.com/convert-fuelconsumption-from-gperkmgasoline-to-mpg.html If anybody happen to have any better estimates / guesses / best friends at Lotus etc. please do not hesitate to let is know it. Thank you in advance.
        PeterScott
        • 2 Years Ago
        *"If anybody happen to have any better estimates / guesses / best friends at Lotus etc. please do not hesitate to let is know it."* I have already given you a much better, more realistic estimate of Range Extender MPG. Given the reality of losses from a series hybrid path, and given that this is a sports car, not an econobox, achieving 40 MPG would be outstanding. That is a completely realistic upper limit. On the lower end, more work was done on the actual ICE, so they won't embarrass themselves like Fisker and get RE MPG in the 20's. I think we can be 95% confident that Range extender Fuel economy would fall into the 30MPG -40MPG range. Any numbers in 60MPG -100MPG range are clearly the combined Gas/Electric voodoo number.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @PeterScott
          You quoted me saying this to you: "As you are just repeating the same stereotypes... as a true 'fanboi' I leave you now at that activity." I was right. Finally just one quote (from you): "I think we can be 95% confident that Range extender Fuel economy would fall into the 30MPG -40MPG range." How will then Lotus possibly achieve their target emissions of just 55 g CO2 / km on the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) with your 95% "confidence probability" guessing of 30MPG -40MPG fuel economy figures? But, of course, this was just a poetic question Peter. No need for answer.
          PeterScott
          • 2 Years Ago
          @PeterScott
          *"How will then Lotus possibly achieve their target emissions of just 55 g CO2 / km on the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) with your 95% "confidence probability" guessing of 30MPG -40MPG fuel economy figures?"* I see calling your earlier opinion ignorant, was giving you the benefit of the doubt, you are actually not just suffering under a knowledge deficit, but the inability to assimilate the information when it is presented to you. It will get 55g/KM the same way the Vauxhaull Ampera (AKA Euro Volt) achieves target emissions of just 40 g/km on NEDC, by including EV miles from the battery pack the produce no emissions! http://www.green-car-guide.com/vauxhall-ampera-.html "The official economy figure for the Vauxhall Ampera is 175 mpg over the NEDC test cycle, and 40 g/km CO2 emissions. Be aware that the NEDC cycle test is only over a very short distance." The number Lotus is targeting is already worse than what the Ampera/Volt has already achieved. Making it an essential certainty that they don't get better than 40 MPG in range extender mode. The only uncertainty is will they even get as high as 30 MPG.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @PeterScott
          @Peter Scott "I see calling your earlier opinion ignorant, was giving you the benefit of the doubt, you are actually not just suffering under a knowledge deficit, but the inability to assimilate the information..." Peter. Your posts only gave me the benefit of the doubt, that you are sane at all. Your abusive name-calling now went beyond any acceptable limit, therefore, I have to conclude: You are just a miserable idiot. Good Bye Peter
          PeterScott
          • 2 Years Ago
          @PeterScott
          Ah, you sad little Muppet. You can't handle facts that show you to be completely wrong, so you just resort to name calling, first repeatedly calling me a "Volt fanboi" (sic) and now I am the idiot when I show actual facts. Sad to be you.
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        I have replied below as to why the guesses you have made are just that. The simple answer to your question is that we don't know, as we don't have the data to arrive at a figure. When Lotus release the relevant data we won't have to guess. Until then a bad estimate is in no way better than no estimate, but positively misleading.
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          You are mistaken if you believe I am not perfectly calm. However my reply to both yours and any other guesses on petrol consumption, both favourable and unfavourable, remains that we don't know.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          Here are some simple reasons, why I made this "outrageous" conversions / estimates / guesses / 'whatevers', using a "misleading" website: Neil Blanchard: "A real serial / series hybrid -- cool! What is the fuel tank capacity; and/or what is the MPG..." Peter Scott: "There already is a real series Hybrid: The Fisker Karma. Unfortunately Series Hybrids aren't the most efficient when running on gas due to higher loses in Motor/Generator/Charging/Discharging cycles." And another estimation after my conversion: Peter Scott "They will be lucky to get 40 MPG out RE mode" etc. It is just an INNOCENT GUESS Dave. It doesn't make any difference in the REAL WORLD. Just a guess Dave.  Calm down.
      Marcopolo
      • 2 Years Ago
      To paraphrase, krisztiant , Just cool, too cool, very, very desirable.. ......
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 2 Years Ago
      too heavy, too expensive, too complicated (get rid of the ICE or at most a tiny 2cylinder carry on option) and lotus is entirely too half hearted about it. they should make a huge banner that reads Dan was right, here we go : ) Lotus could and should steal Tesla's performance EV thunder. the roadster left a vacuum that lotus could sweep in and steal with a 3.3 second 35000$ car. followed by a 2.7 second version a year later. then a 2 second ridiculous version costing only slightly more. just murder ferrari and lambo in video after video. and really humiliate veyrons
        Alexi
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        The Tesla roadster used a Lotus glider. It would be essentially the same thing...
          Letstakeawalk
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Alexi
          I appreciate your POV, but I still would suggest that an automobile glider would connote a more complete car that only wants a drivetrain. Lotus supplies only the chassis, which they don't even design. If they provided the chassis, along with a body and an interior (ie a more complete auto - and all from Lotus spec with no outside input) I would agree that they were providing a glider.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Alexi
          Not a Lotus glider, but an independently-designed-by-Tesla chassis produced by Lotus under contract as a supplier. Slight difference, but the Tesla engineers would appreciate the recognition.
          Dan Frederiksen
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Alexi
          LTAW, it's technically correct to say it's a lotus glider. but it was not just an elise chassis but a somewhat modified elise chassis. and it was a mistake to use lotus when it would have been easy and cheaper and more flexible to have just built it in house. both chassis and bodywork but outsourced a few things like the glass
          Dan Frederiksen
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Alexi
          that's simplistic. the tesla roadster has a 450kg battery. it doesn't have to be that way. and that's just a particularly substantial aspect. there are many choices to be made, many that could be a lot better than tesla did. I would use a 100kg pack. not 450. and that makes quite a bit of difference.
        Chris M
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        Dan, Lotus has actual engineers that actually do know what they're doing. Lotus is the top expert in lowering weight, but unlike a certain inept wanna-be engineer we know, Lotus engineers are not willing to sacrifice reliability and safety just to achieve absurdly low weights in their vehicle.
          Dan Frederiksen
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Chris M
          if Lotus is so competent, how do you explain Dany Bahar. how do you explain the lack of electric cars. is anyone here excited about lotus products. you are so small minded Chris. always blind faith in illusions of authority. unlike you I actually understand the relevant engineering.
      • 2 Years Ago
      As the debate on the Lotus 414E series hybrid efficiency went simply berserk, here's one study which happens to prove - in only 5 pages - that the series hybrid drivetrain way more efficient, than the parallel hybrid (now a 'little hope' for the Lotus 414E): (You can find of course studies showing the exact opposite, which only proves, that NOBODY KNOWS REALLY at the moment, INCLUDING naturally the ABG COMMENTERS as well) "Definition of drivetrains and terms compared in Figure 1: 1. Any Gas-Electric Hybrid - Compared to a conventional Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) drivetrain, any type of hybrid adds the weight and complexity of the electric motor and battery pack. However, this is offset to varying degrees by being able to use a smaller, lighter gasoline engine... 2. Parallel Hybrid -" [You can read it in the paper] Simply put substance: the parallel hybrid is too complex and heavy. "Series Hybrid - In contrast to the parallel hybrid all drive power in a Series Hybrid is delivered to the wheels by the electric motor(s). The ICE is only used to drive a generator to produce electricity. The Series Hybrid is “stronger” than a Strong Hybrid since the electric motor has to be powerful enough to provide the desired performance with no assistance from an ICE powerplant. This mode of operation drastically reduces the size of the ICE since it only provides the average power required by the car not the peak power. The power required from the ICE is only 25 to 50 horsepower [exactly like in the Lotus 414E] and the need for a transmission can be eliminated with good electric motor design. When the ICE runs it does so at its most efficient operating point... since any excess power above what is immediately needed by the drive motor, is collected in the batteries. Because our means of controlling engine speed in gasoline engines is to choke off the air supply and increase resistance to airflow they are terribly inefficient when operated at low speed and low power, and the larger the engine, the more inefficient it is. Typical efficiencies for city driving are as low as 15%, while at highway speeds it could be as high as 25%. But an electric motor runs with nearly the same efficiency (usually over 90%) at all operating speeds, and a 250 HP electric motor is just as efficient as a 60 HP electric motor. The benefits of the Series Hybrid configuration are: a. Efficiency improvements of up to 300%, resulting in 75 mpg instead of 25 mpg (yes that’s what 300% means) for the same size automobile!..." etc. [You can read it in the paper too] And something about BEVs: "5. All-Electric Vehicle or EV - An all-electric car completely eliminates about 600lbs of engine and transmission, but adds about 200 lbs of electric motors and 700 lbs of batteries. It has no alternative power source when the batteries are depleted, so the main drawback of this configuration is that recharging a dead vehicle on the side of the road can be extremely inconvenient or dangerous." *** See Table 1 on the Next Page *** Prepared for the Freedom Formula Foundation... (Which shows the series hybrid efficiency advantages over parallel hybrids) http://serieshybrid.com/FreedomFormula/images/Drivetrain_Comparison.pdf CONCLUSION: The Lotus 414E still has some chance to be an extremely efficient, nice and powerful sports car. #hopedieslast
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Peter Scott Wasting some more time on you, I would point out now your mentioned previous "95% confidence probability guessing's" little 'inconsistency': Your source: "Ampera MPG: The official economy figure for the Vauxhall Ampera is 175 mpg over the NEDC test cycle, and 40 g/km CO2 emissions." So, if: Ampera: 40 g/km CO2 = 175 mpg (NEDC) Then why: Lotus: 55 g/km CO2 = max. 30-40 mpg ??? (NEDC) That's exactly why I called you a 'fanboi' Peter. since you are clearly acting like a fanboi (i.e. no logic at all). Unfortunately for you, now I easily disproved your "damning evidence' on your stereotype. Nevertheless, I wish you a nice day.
          • 2 Years Ago
          Peter, I'm really sorry, but I don't have any more time for you. #bye
          PeterScott
          • 2 Years Ago
          Because the NEDC number is not the Range Extender number. You do remember you were making big claims about Range Extender mode MPG?? Go back the the very first post and I pointed this out as your faulty assumption. This was your quote where I first pointed out your faulty assumption. This is what you have been arguing all along. You have been continually misunderstanding NEDC and conflating it with Range Extender MPG. @krisztiant "Meanwhile using approx. an average of 99.21 mpg (2.37 l/100km) gas (only when in range extended mode!)" That is wrong and what I have been trying get you to realize. Though you refuse to listen to reason. But now having NEDC numbers for both give us is a basis of comparison of efficiency, and a possibility to solve for the missing Range Extender MPG for the Lotus, because we do have Range Extender MPG for the Volt. A Volt gets 40g/km on NEDC and gets 37 MPG on the EPA Range Extender test (the value we are interested in). The lotus getting 55g/km on NEDC would means the Lotus is significantly less efficient than the Volt. Now you should realize that we can solve for the missing Range Extender number for the Lotus. Do that calculation and the result is LESS than 30 MPG in Range Extender Mode for the Lotus. So I may have been too optimistic in my first estimate of Lotus Range Extender. If I were to revise that 10 MPG spread, I would now use: 26 MPG - 36 MPG as most likely range to capture the Range Extender MPG. My original point from way back stands. You misunderstood NEDC and as the basis for your faulty assumptions you have outlandishly overstating Range Extender MPG. I originally said 40 MPG was a more reasonable upper limit, though given the additional info now available, we can safely drop that to about 36 MPG. Bottom line. A Volt gets 37 MPG in Range Extender Mode, the Lotus is significantly less efficient than the Volt (as per NEDC), so it MUST get less than 37 MPG in Range Extender Mode.
        PeterScott
        • 2 Years Ago
        You really need to learn the difference between a scientific paper, and internet crackpots who don't even understand basic science. You quoted the latter. One hint might be your "paper" includes double exclamations (!!). Also it reads like comedy. "The Series Hybrid is “stronger” than a Strong Hybrid". Comedy gold. Who wrote this? Pakleds? "We like Series Hybrid, "it's Stronger", it makes us go..." Your comedy post aside, Some inconvenient facts for you: Most full hybrids are Series/Parallel designs containing the advantages of both types of drive-train, so the the series hybrid doesn't have any efficiency advantage over common series-parallel, It is less efficient than common Series-Parallel designs. Series-Parallel designs include Toyota/Ford hybrids including the Plug in Prius. It also includes the Chevy Volt/Vauxhall Ampera. That brings me back to the central fact you are ignoring: http://www.green-car-guide.com/vauxhall-ampera-.html "The official economy figure for the Vauxhall Ampera is 175 mpg over the NEDC test cycle, and 40 g/km CO2 emissions. Be aware that the NEDC cycle test is only over a very short distance." That is the official Ampera/Volt number on NEDC: 40g/KM of CO2. How the heck can the new Lotus be more efficient, when it's target is 55g/KM of CO2 on NEDC? I like the Lotus, it is a beautiful dream car concept/technology showcase, but it has no efficiency super powers. It is more performance car than economy car.
          PeterScott
          • 2 Years Ago
          @PeterScott
          Clearly you are much farther divorced from reality than I thought. But if you ever find yourself capable of rational thought ponder how the target 55g/km Lotus is more efficient that the Volt/Ampera that was actually tested to achieve 40g/km?? Those simple facts make all your nonsense (more) irrelevant. 55g/km > 40g/km. That means the Lotus is consuming more fuel/km and is less efficient, and gets less MPG than the Volt/Ampera. Case closed (except for religious zealots/madmen).
          • 2 Years Ago
          @PeterScott
          @Peter Scott You already posted your well-known (and by now just dull) stereotypes at least ten times here. You are exactly acting like the great scientist of the past, who endlessly claimed, that heavier than air flying machines are not possible. Also, you are calling a study - written for the Freedom Formula Foundation - a comedy and its authors crackpots. At least the people who wrote this paper actually created a study, as well as, published it, while you are just posting other people's stereotypes infinitely on a blog. Thus, until you can't write a study to disprove this paper, and publish it publicly: You are just a "comedy" Peter or rather just a "crackpot". Just hang up already. #hangup
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Peter Scott After having had to unfortunately read your repeated stupid stereotypes, as well as, enduring your never ending name-calling, I can only say: You are the most annoying retard on ABG. Or even more simply put (as you sufficiently proved this already): You are just a miserable idiot. Now Peter's newest retarded abusive name-calling commence in 3... 2... 1...
          PeterScott
          • 2 Years Ago
          55g/km > 40 g/km is not a stereotype. You need to look up that word, because you keep using it without understanding it. It doesn't mean what you think it means. Second. You started Name calling, by repeatedly calling me a "Volt fanboi" (sic). I offered some small measure of retaliation, but really none was necessary, your own posts denigrate you far more than I ever could. When you really flew off the handle was after I found that the Ampera (Euro Volt) was tested officially at 40g/km of C02 on the NEDC test. It seems you can't rationally deal with the FACT that the Volt is more efficient than the Lotus. So ever since I posted this you completely ducked this fact, and instead resorted to insults and posting nonsense. Sane adults react to new information, by learning from it, not throwing tantrums.
      Jonathan
      • 2 Years Ago
      I like this car but I'm suprised that they have any money to develope this car in the first place .
      American Refugee
      • 2 Years Ago
      Lovely. But given Lotus's current financial and leadership struggles, what's the plan for applying this technology beyond a prototype?
        American Refugee
        • 2 Years Ago
        @American Refugee
        Proton is trying to shop Lotus and bail, and they haven't been successful. Also, Danny Behar. You kind of want him to fail. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-norfolk-18215542
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @American Refugee
          Yikes!! Thanks. A shame that a wonderful engineering company is in such a mess.
          American Refugee
          • 2 Years Ago
          @American Refugee
          Sorry, I meant DRB, which bought out Proton. Needless to say, it's not a stable situation.
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @American Refugee
        Since I have not been following closely, I am unfamiliar with the problems you refer to. Perhaps you would outline what you mean in more detail? AFAIK they are owned by Proton, and their development models have a good chance of making it into production, either by Proton or the numerous other companies which use Lotus technology in one way or another, as for instance the Lotus range extender was put in a prototype Jag.
      PeterScott
      • 2 Years Ago
      Consolidated reply to krisztiant. *"Please explain your remarkable ideas to the engineers involved in the development of the Lotus Evora 414E plug-in hybrid." I don't contradict the engineers working on the 414E? I am only contradicting you faulty assumption that the 414E gets 99MPG in RE Mode. This a completely ignorant assumption. Lotus didn't double the efficiency of the ICE. The 99 MPG is the combined Electric/Gas equivalent MPG. The RE mode will do quite well to achieve 40 MPG given the physical reality of pure series hybrids. *"As you are just repeating the same stereotypes defending the Volt as a true 'fanboi' I leave you now at that activity." Nice ad hominem attack, but if you were a regular, you would realize, I am no fan of the Volt at all. But I am a fan of reality/physics. Physics isn't a stereotype. I was just pointing out that the Volt uses a mechanical connection to the wheels to increase the efficiency. Something deemed required because a pure series hybrid takes a significant efficiency hit from IC-Engine/Gen/EV-Motor conversions. Also don't mistake my pointing out your erroneous assumption as some kind of dislike for the 414E. Driving the rear wheels with independent motors allows for some very special handling characteristics. I love the paddle shifter control of regen. Plus I just like the Lotus and their lightweight ethos. The Lotus is by far the coolest Range Extender car I have seen and the one I would most like to own if I won a lottery, and they actually produced it for sale. But neither is likely.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @PeterScott
        As you are pretty persistent Peter - but eventually show some reason as well - I answer your newest 'au premier plan' post: First the simple answers: You: "I am only contradicting you faulty assumption that the 414E gets 99MPG in RE Mode."  It's not a "faulty assumption" Peter, it's not even an assumption, it is just a simple conversion, as some of the posters raised the puzzling question about the fuel economy of the 414E, so - as we don't have hard data on it yet - I simply used the only available information [from Lotus] to begin with, calculating the fuel economy using a simple and well-accepted formula. THAT IS IT PETER! You: "This a completely ignorant assumption. Lotus didn't double the efficiency of the ICE." It is an interesting part: Although, Lotus indeed didn't double the efficiency of the ICE, but - I even had recently a comprehensive post on this - the auto industry DID double the practical thermodynamic efficiency limits of IC engines [>60% as opposed to -35%]. How come? They simply concluded at two recent conferences, that IC engines are NOT Carnot heat engines (any more) and therefore are not limited by Carnot efficiency (as was thought before). Instead of a long explanation, here's the presentation's link for you: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/pdfs/deer_2011/wednesday/presentations/deer11_edwards.pdf So, just like this long held "ignorant assumption" or - more politely - common misconception has died recently about the ICE's practical thermodynamic efficiency limit (due to some scientific discovery) your stereotype just as easily could die too about the series hybrids efficiency limits (as Lotus seems to clearly proving this for you). As the fundamental scientific / engineering substance involved in the development of the Lotus Evora 414E plug-in hybrid is by all odds beyond the scope of a blog post, I simply skip any deeper demonstration of this statement. Finally: I'm honestly glad - as you admitted it - that you very much like this Lotus plug-in hybrid. I like it too, therefore, we can agree in something at long last. Wishing you that you can actually afford this Lotus / "win a lottery", as they release it for the public. Until, Warm Regarda
          • 2 Years Ago
          I can just reiterate myself again: "As you are just repeating the same stereotypes endlessly, I leave you now at that activity." It was very nice to meet you.
          PeterScott
          • 2 Years Ago
          *" it's not even an assumption, it is just a simple conversion"* I know where you got the number from. But your faulty assumption was reporting the result as the Range Extender MPG, when it is was obviously the combined Gas/Electric number. That is a big failure, and you faulty assumption. You know who else was reporting 100 MPG early on? Fisker: http://www.classicdriver.com/uk/magazine/3300.asp?id=14039 It gets closer to 20 MPG in RE mode. *"the auto industry DID double the practical thermodynamic efficiency limits of IC engines [>60% as opposed to -35%"* They changed no practical limit. They merely made the theoretical argument that ICE are not limited to the Carnot cycle, even if correct, it changes nothing in practical reality. The practical limits are exactly the same as they always were. Also there already exist real world ICE engines with over 50% efficiency (large shipping diesels).
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