Tata eMO
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Yes, the car will still cost less than $20,000. No, we still don't know when it's coming out.

India-based Tata Motors is working with France-based Dassualt Systems at developing more technology for the eMO ("electric mobility") electric vehicle that's so far only appeared in concept form, the Hindu Business Line reported.

The two companies are working on design touches that will keep both the cost and weight of the vehicle as low as possible in order to reach the goal of selling a vehicle with a 100-mile single-charge range for less than $20,000, according to the publication. But there's still no word on how much Tata's investing or when a production model will see the light of day.

Tata Technologies' President of Vehicle Programs and Development Kevin Fisher, speaking at the North American Auto Show in Detroit in January, called the eMO "a giant business card" that the automaker was using to pitch its new technologies, though he wasn't specific on if or when the car would be made.

Tata has said the eMO's 18.4 kilowatt-hour battery pack can provide as many as 100 miles on a single charge. The car's design aspects include "suicide" rear doors and no B-pillar to allow for a larger opening, which will make up for the fact that the car will have no rear hatch.

Tata, which acquired Jaguar Land Rover from Ford for $2.3 billion four years ago, continues to show signs of entering the electric-drive vehicle market. Tata had planned to start selling its Tata Vista Indica electric vehicle in India last year, though that model has yet to debut. Tata has said the 74-horsepower Vista Indica EV has a top speed of 71 miles per hour as well as a 100-mile single-charge range.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 13 Comments
      Spec
      • 2 Years Ago
      The sound system can only play Linkin Park.
      Turbo Froggy
      • 2 Years Ago
      $20K EV, sounds good, however I will save judgement until the crash testing comes out.
      paulwesterberg
      • 2 Years Ago
      Looks like the large A pillar could create blind spots in front of the vehicle. The back needs more tapering or aerodynamics will suffer.
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        If you start improving the aerodynamics the first thing you are going to want to do is to taper off the back, as Paul says. That increases the road space, and there is none to spare in Indian cities. Since it will spend most of it's miles never going over 20 mph in traffic jams it doesn't really make a lot of difference in lifetime fuel consumption.
          DaveMart
          • 4 Months Ago
          @DaveMart
          It is their minds and their thoughts. It is not up to you, or me, to change them. They are sovereign rulers there. What you can do though is offer suggestions, and if you present your thoughts better they will at least get a hearing. All that sounds a bit mealy mouthed, and I can get as sharp as anyone, and impatient of folly. Still, the fact remains that head-butting against others does not win many debates, and the way you say things is as important as what is said. Neither you nor I can tell people what to think, nor should we be able to do so. The best we can manage is to present our case in a way which is not instantly dismissed. No one listens to people who shout.
          DaveMart
          • 4 Months Ago
          @DaveMart
          Dan: You might have a point about speed in India. You do have to design a car fora particular market though, rather than on some set of purely abstract criteria. The first thing I would be aware of is that the roads there have craters the size of Manhattan, and so a robust suspension is number one priority, whether that works out heavy or light after cost is taken into consideration. The second thing is that the occupancy rate of cars is very high compared to the West, with a lot more people often on board, and that roads are crowded and space at a premium. They are also lethal, but most people simply cannot afford to go overboard on safety. The cars they have access to are at any rate safer than we had access to in the 50's and 60's when people at large in the UK were getting motorised. Getting in the back of the early Mini's was not only difficult, but the things were death traps. BTW, you complain that you are routinely downgraded without reference to the quality of your arguments. You could avoid much of that by stopping the routine characterisation of other's arguments as mindless and so on, and self recommendation of your own views. So long as you carry on presenting what you have to say in that way, people will simply dismiss whatever you have to say, and ignoring you. It doesn't work, and you need to realise that.
          Dan Frederiksen
          • 4 Months Ago
          @DaveMart
          Dave my man, show me how to change their minds, then I will concede you did it better than me.
          Dan Frederiksen
          • 4 Months Ago
          @DaveMart
          it's just not true that all driving in india is slow nor is it true that there is no room for an aerodynamic car. why such mindless opposition to reason
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        It's probably not intended to go fast enough for aerodynamics to be too much of a worry. On the crowded streets of Indian cities road space is more important than tapering the body, and if you are getting your whole family in a small car then you want to approximate a cube, not a dart. The Hyundai i10 is built in India and is one of the most popular cars there: http://www.hyundai-car.co.uk/newCars/i10/ It's a triumph of packaging, not aerodynamics.
        Dan Frederiksen
        • 2 Years Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        yes but the blatantly obvious continually escapes the designers. a modern EV1 with 2+2 seating and strong performance with a small battery could take the world by storm. but nooooo, it'll be an ugly little thing like the above because the mental capacity of these people is so childishly simplistic that they make the following conclusion, cheap electric car means city car. that's it. fate decided right there. and "we all know" what a city car looks like. couldn't we give it strong acceleration largely ofr free because of the way electric drive works? no couldn't we make it aerodynamic which costs nothing and saves us a lot on battery? no, then it wouldn't be a city car you see. aerodynamics means it's a sports car and we have to charge triple for that. otherwise we couldn't have artificial product differentiation so the mindless sheep have something fictitious to strive for in their wasted lives. cars can't just get better like that. that would be progress. we can't have that. all cars need to do is get more expensive to match the earning power of people to keep them eternally in capitalistic slavery. say like sheep
          brotherkenny4
          • 4 Months Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          "aerodynamics means it's a sports car and we have to charge triple for that. otherwise we couldn't have artificial product differentiation so the mindless sheep have something fictitious to strive for in their wasted lives." I agree with this point totally. But how do we wake the morons up? You know they prefer to be lead. It absolves them from all responsibility. Better that their unhappiness be caused by someone else than be their own fault. So instead, be lead and ignorant and remain in bliss. All rather boring to me, but in democratic-like countries it is the thing we have to live with. We have mostly available to us those things that the average person can be convinced is the desired ones. To be different or think differently costs extra, or may not be available at all. You know the fear is, and it's probably well founded in analysis, that the electric cars will eventually become less expensive than the ICE cars. Without the ICE itself as a profit area for the car companies, they will be left to compete in a market of lower value and commodity priced components. Only the most diligent and efficient will survive. Then too, the batteries, if made at low enough cost, will enable solar and wind electricity, and then how will you keep the sheep tethered to their monthly payments? And who will make the money? It all might sound good to those of us who would rather be free, but most people don't want to be free, and since we are in democratic-like countries the sheep will continue to vote for a secure "chain of their very own".
      DaveMart
      • 2 Years Ago
      I quite like the look of that. I am not sure about side impact protection with the rear suicide doors though.
      Ziv
      • 2 Years Ago
      That windshield goes back almost over the drivers head, kind of a blended sunroof. Interesting but I bet that feature doesn't get to production. Also the back seats are a bit problematic, tiny and accesible only via suicide doors. But I doubt that they carry the stigma in India that they do here. But getting into the back seat if you are over 5' tall will be a squeeze. The aero isn't optimal, but as many have pointed out, the city mpg is much more important than the hwy in a lot of markets.
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