Renault Zoe crash test
  • Renault Zoe crash test
  • Renault Zoe crash test

Renault Zoe crash test
  • Renault Zoe crash test
  • Renault Zoe crash test

Renault Zoe crash test
  • Renault Zoe crash test
  • Renault Zoe crash test

Renault Zoe crash test
  • Renault Zoe crash test
  • Renault Zoe crash test

Renault Zoe crash test
  • Renault Zoe crash test
  • Renault Zoe crash test

Renault Zoe crash test
  • Renault Zoe crash test
  • Renault Zoe crash test

Renault Zoe crash test
  • Renault Zoe crash test
  • Renault Zoe crash test

Renault Zoe crash test
  • Renault Zoe crash test
  • Renault Zoe crash test

Renault Zoe crash test
  • Renault Zoe crash test
  • Renault Zoe crash test

Renault Zoe crash test
  • Renault Zoe crash test
  • Renault Zoe crash test

Renault has high hopes for the all-electric Zoe, saying that it will outsell the Nissan Leaf in Europe. Pricewise, the Zoe will be much less. Thanks to battery leasing (which alliance partner Nissan is also considering for the Leaf) of around $110 a month, the Zoe will cost roughly $21,000 (in U.S. dollars, after factoring in government incentives) in the European companies where it will be sold. Before that can happen, the car needs to be crash tested. And that's just what's happened at the company's own Lardy test center for electric vehicles in France, as the photo gallery shows.

On Twitter, Renault team members wrote, "As you can see, the battery (located under the chassis) has not been affected by the crash," and "The front end must be capable of absorbing the shock to protect the passengers. From 64km/h to 0 in just 50 cm!" In American, that's from 40 miles per hour to zero in 19.6 inches. What's even more impressive is that Renault has revealed that, "During its conception, nearly 100 ZOE have been sacrificed for greater safety (frontal impact, side impact, offside impact...)." Oh, the humanity. But we're guessing you're hungry for more. If so, check out the video below.



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