Konstantin Othmer loves his Tesla Model S. The serial entrepreneur was one of the lucky few who took delivery last Friday at the car's official launch and as such, he is one of just a handful of people who have had more then a mere ten minutes behind the wheel.

He has spent that time well. Besides giving rides to friends and family, he's also taken the opportunity to share with the world at large what it is, exactly, that he likes about his new all-electric ride in an entertaining video.

We won't give it all away, but will say that he does touch on a couple of our favorite themes. No gas needed, along with lots of performance. Enough performance, in fact, that his camera person (understandably) let's out an expletive or two during some acceleration demonstrations. Luckily for those at work or sensitive to such coarse outbursts, he's just put up a family-friendly version.

We've seen initial media impressions of the Model S, as well as those from reservation holders. Now, scroll below and see what an owner makes of America's first electric performance sedan.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 40 Comments
      Randy C
      • 1 Day Ago
      A new benchmark for luxury cars. One that no other car maker can match. The performance of Ferrari combined with a all around very innovative vehicle. No car maker is going to be able to match Model S's environmental footprint and have the same performance.
      Jim McL
      • 1 Day Ago
      The still photo at the top article is telling, if you look past the jumping guy. There are two Clipper Creek wall mounted chargers, probably because the Model S supports charging from two inlets simultaneously at 10 kW each as I recall. These are relatively inexpensive SAE J1772 charging units that any modern US EV can charge from, but with two running at 40 amps each, the model S can charge about as fast as the Leaf on some of the smaller 22 kW Chademo stations that are FAR more expensive. Another thing to notice, there is a cut-off switch next to each Clipper Creek unit on the wall. This is only required by the National Electrical Code (chapter 625?) if the charging box can supply more than 50 amps. So it seems quite likely that these are the 70 amp capable charging boxes that only the Tesla Roadster can take full advantage of. Even if the Model S draws only 40 amps from each of two inputs, that is still 2x40=80 amps and a bit faster charging than the Roadster. More importantly, you can charge that fast at most any RV campground if you can get between two 50 amp RV outlets. Tesla sells the only portable 40 amp charging box (EVSE) that I know of although there are a few "portable" 16 amp units (Leviton) and 32 amp units (SPX) appearing on the market. (The SPX might even support direct internet visibility from what I have read.) There are many more RV parks around than Chademo units, so Tesla is leapfrogging again without needing huge infrastructure investments to do it. Very very smart. Nissan and GM might be moving more units, but they are not this smart. Yet. I find it odd that the photo does not show Tesla's more "elegant" home charging box marketed with the Model S, but this staging room might predate the Model S. Bottom line to me that BMW better get moving before Tesla eats BMWS lunch, dinner, breakfast, and snacks too. I could see Tesla doing to BMW what Apple did to Research in Motion. (The iPhone killed the Blackberry according to many.) There is a huge paradigm shift coming. Massive changes to the auto industry are on the way. It might hit heavy trucking last but it is already changing the city bus industry, refuse trucks and medium-duty local distribution (think UPS and FedEx). I just wonder if electrification will change the automotive industry as fast as Apple changed the personal electronics industry? Maybe faster. The industry has been warned. Will they prioritize short term profits or survival? Competition is so much more entertaining than war, isn't it? It really is a completely new age. Such a hopeful future we might leave to our children. If we don't mess up.
        Rotation
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Jim McL
        When a car is in development, it's in development. You don't do all the ancillary stuff like the chargers and then get the car done. You work on all them at once. So Tesla still has the older equipment in this room, they'll upgrade it at some point. For all we know, the double charger isn't even ready yet. Tesla kill BMW? What? The adoption rate for EVs will not be anywhere near as fast as Apple's rise in consumer gadgets. Anyone can plug in a consumer gadget in their house. And many can afford them. Whereas most people are not ready for an EV and they don't buy a new car every two years anyway.
        Doug
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Jim McL
        A lot of half understood misinformation in that post. Check your facts. The Model S only has one charge port.
          Grendal
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Doug
          @JakeY Yes. I knew that. Chargers are not charge ports but I can see why someone might mistake the two and is the reason for my post. But I was not clear, so thanks for clarifying the point.
          Rotation
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Doug
          The 90kW "supercharger" is unrelated. It's DC charging, not AC. With AC charging, the "charger" (actually EVSE) just gets regular AC power to the car, and the car converts the AC to the right voltage of DC to charge the batteries. This puts a lot of power conversion (heat) into the car. At higher charge currents the heat is just too much and the on-board chargers would be so large as to add noticeable weight which would reduce efficiency while travelling. With DC charging ("supercharging") the fixed charger (on the wall, but it's really too big for a wall in this case) the car tells the out-board charger what voltage of DC to produce to match what the batteries need right now. The DC out-board charger has to be a lot more sophisticated, complex and therefore expensive. But it does allow something that otherwise would require a lot of sacrifice in vehicle weight, super fast charging.
          JakeY
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Doug
          @Grendal Dual chargers doesn't mean two charge ports (I don't know where people get that impression). It just means twice the available charging power (20kW vs 10kW standard). The 90kW "supercharger" is made up of nine 10kW chargers, but that's still only going through one charge port.
          Grendal
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Doug
          But dual chargers are an add-on for some cars and are included in the Signatures.
          Anne
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Doug
          @Rotation, Interesting that Renault did put a fast charger (42 kW) inside the ZOE. Clever move, since it makes installing fast chargers a lot cheaper. Fast charging infrastructure is what is most lacking now, not limited range. The reason why they were able to do that, is because any electric car already has most of the needed power electronics on board in the motor controller. By making one, integrated charger/controller in which the charger shares some of the more expensive components with the controller, they were able to do that cost effectively.
          Rotation
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Doug
          Yeah, but supposedly the dual charger (for home) can run off two 50A circuits. So it's still possible RV parks could install them using existing circuits.
      DaveMart
      • 1 Day Ago
      Again, tips don't work, hence this posting; Ecomove, a Danish company, is to introduce a lightweight, 300km range odd-looking electric vehicle this year, the QBeak: 'QBEAK is made from non-corrosive materials that can sustain minor crashes. The result is a sturdy and robust vehicle with a weight of approximately 400 kg. Even loaded with batteries allowing the full range of app 300 km the total weight is considerable lower than comparable cars. With a length of just 3 meters QBEAK has 1-6 removable seats or a large trunk (with space to fit a Euro-pallet in the trunk along with 3 seats). The car is also highly flexible in terms of interior and exterior design and finish options whilst batteries are available in removable modules (from 1-6 modules) allowing a driving range of up to 300 km. The short body length and its sliding side doors makes parking and driving easy, even in busy urban environments. The driver's seat is located in the middle allowing you to choose which side to get in or out.' http://en.ecomove.dk/article/84025-first-full-body-version-of-qbeak Here is a run-down of the lightweight materials involved: 'The chassis of the QBEAK design was developed by UK-based chassis technology company Inrekor, which claims it can reduce the weight of core vehicle structures by 30 per cent. Inrekor’s composite chassis consists of two aluminium sheets separated by a layer of ARPRO; a lightweight material already used in certain automotive applications. ‘One of the standard uses of ARPRO in the automotive industry is impact protection,’ said Gary Carr, marketing and communications manager at JSP, which develops and produces ARPRO. ‘So it’s used in places such as the core of bumpers and inside impact panels. ‘It deforms but then reaches a point where it reforms its shape naturally so it’s like a very tough balloon if you like. It’s very good at absorbing energy.’ Carr explained that ARPRO also has desirable insulating properties that can minimise energy usage for heating and air conditioning; further prolonging battery life. In addition, the ARPRO core can improve the driving experience by reducing noise, vibration and harshness. ‘One of the reasons we can use this chassis is because we have developed a new patented wheel unit,’ said ECOMove spokesperon Mogens Løkke. ‘We have developed four independent wheel units on the car that are literally attached to the side of the chassis.' http://www.theengineer.co.uk/design-engineering/news/company-shows-lightweight-material-for-electric-vehicles/1012657.article
        DaveMart
        • 1 Day Ago
        @DaveMart
        Arpro website here: http://www.arpro.com/
        DaveMart
        • 1 Day Ago
        @DaveMart
        In addition to the above, they intend at some stage to do a range extender. They want to use a biomethane fuel cell! 'The combined concept with fuel cells solution in a battery electric vehicle will bring significant end-user and customer benefits in comparison with existing diesel generators and lead-acid battery solutions: • A range of at least 800 km - 4 times longer than the average electric vehicle. • A refuelling time of less than 3 minutes - similar to gasoline cars today. • Possibility to utilise the existing Energy infrastructure and distribution system - enabling a low cost introduction and an overall cost effective fuel economy. • Highly valuable waste heat for cabin heating/cooling with a combined efficiency above 80 %. • A longer lifetime of the batteries due to a more stable State Of Charge (SOC). http://en.ecomove.dk/article/87480-a-clean-simple-and-competitive-range-extended-ev-is-on-its-way I think although methanol fuel cells are at a relatively early stage they are making a serious case. The efficiency of them is ~25%, as against the ~50% plus of hydrogen fuel cells, but all the difficult bits of fuel storage are avoided, and as a RE the waste heat, as they point out, is useful for heating and cooling. Precious metal use in methanol fuel cells is much higher than in hydrogen though, and this should not be thought of as something which is going to be rolled out anytime soon, but just the same I think it has potential. Presumably, although I have not been able to locate data to confirm this, the efficiency of methanol fuel cells could also be much increased.
        DaveMart
        • 1 Day Ago
        @DaveMart
        I've located a paper, rather old from 2006, on the theoretical and practical efficiencies of methanol fuel cells. They reckon that internal reformation is better, as the heat can be used. http://web.anl.gov/PCS/acsfuel/preprint%20archive/Files/09_3_ATLANTIC%20CITY_09-65_0135.pdf The bottom line is that we are nowhere near the theoretical limits. Engineering our way through to them may be tough though! ;-)
      DaveMart
      • 1 Day Ago
      @Rotation: Those Toshiba cells obviously did not work properly. That does not mean that all methanol fuel cells are doomed. The EFOY ones work fine in very demanding environments. Google them, and you won't find many complaints.
      Joseph Davis
      • 1 Day Ago
      The car is great. The dropping the camera gag was lame. The huge LCDs seemed a little much. However the lux feel of the car was nice. Great execution for a sophmore release. Kudos to Tesla. It is a mountain of a task to release a car in such a competive and regulated industry and in CA no less. Great job
      Grendal
      • 1 Day Ago
      Thanks ABG. I've posted this video three times already.
        Grendal
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Grendal
        Me = Jealous If money were no object then I'd definitely would be owning one of these babies. But I must be practical and will get the Gen III/Bluestar instead. Congatulations Konstantin and Tesla.
      Grendal
      • 1 Day Ago
      Oh and here's another good video review of the car from Motor Trend: https://wot.motortrend.com/wide-open-throttle-drives-tesla-model-s-explores-tesla-factory-224955.html Thanks again, ABG.
      Rotation
      • 1 Day Ago
      Methanol fuel cells hit the market 3 years ago. In laptops and such. They disappeared already.
      Letstakeawalk
      • 1 Day Ago
      I never doubted DMFCs themselves were on the market, I've linked to EFOY products several times. Rotation - you wrote that DMFCs were on the market, "...in laptops and such." I asked for you to link to a laptop that was powered by a DMFC - and posted a link that many laptop makers were looking at them, but hadn't produced one yet. "Please link to a laptop that was available on the market with a DMFC." The Toshiba Dynario is not a laptop. I also disagree with your conclusion that "they came and went". DMFCs are a new tech, so there is undoubtedly a "valley of death" where after an initial big enthusiasm, there is a period where many DMFC makers won't survive. However, DMFCs are still available, and their market continues to expand.
      Rotation
      • 1 Day Ago
      Letstakeawalk: I'm not your slave. I gave information, it wasn't to satisfy your whining, it was to inform. You want to believe that methanol fuel cells are viable in laptops, go ahead and continue to do so. A lot of good that will do you. DaveMart: You're talking about something different there from the ones I'm talking about. I'm not talking about RVs. But you will note that you are buying 10kWh, or about $2 of electricity for $40 (10L container). This underscores, as I pointed out, that methanol systems really will only sell to those who are going to be away from electricity for a relatively long period of time. You're paying through the nose for the electricity. If aren't away as long, you can get battery capacity to provide what these can provide (at their 25-65W output) for much less. Additionally, you will note that as I mentioned, these units must pulse on and off, they cannot replace a battery, they are a recharging system. I speak of the sizing issues, and you point at a system which produces 65 continuous Watts (1/10th HP). In short, you spend your time trying to point out how I'm mistaken and instead all the info you have backs up what I said. Oh, maybe I didn't expand my horizons enough to think of other uses for methanol fuel cells, but I assure you given the limitations they have you aren't going to see them in anything but a few use cases. I don't think you'll see them in cars, even the largest of these would take 200 hours to recharge even a Volt fully. Even if you only drive 10 miles a day, you could only drive every other day and you'd be paying well over a dollar a mile in fueling costs (about 14L of methanol would go 36 miles at a price of about $65 for the Methanol).
      Rotation
      • 1 Day Ago
      Congrats, Kon.
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Rotation
        Lucky guy...
      Rotation
      • 1 Day Ago
      The "dropping the camera" gag gets old by the 3rd time. Still a good video though.
        Spec
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Rotation
        Some seem kinda fake. You can see a car in front of him in some of them . . . how did he not smash them if he accelerated so fast? I hope they sell many thousands of those cars. I'd take that over a Fisker, no question.
        Joseph Davis
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Rotation
        Thats why they make camera straps
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