2012 Toyota Yaris SE
  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE
  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE front 3/4 view

  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE
  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE rear 3/4 view

  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE
  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE front 3/4 view

  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE
  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE rear 3/4 view

  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE
  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE side view

  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE
  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE front view

  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE
  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE rear view

  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE
  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE logo

  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE
  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE headlight

  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE
  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE front fender

  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE
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  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE
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  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE door handle

  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE
  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE logo

  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE
  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE taillight

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  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE rear marker

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  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE badge

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  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE engine

  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE
  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE engine

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  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE interior

  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE
  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE interior

  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE
  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE interior

  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE
  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE interior

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  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE front seats

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  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE steering wheel

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  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE steering wheel stitching

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  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE shifter

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  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE rear seats

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  • 2012 Toyota Yaris SE rear cargo area

Toyota has already made it abundantly clear the company intends to scale back production in Japan in an attempt to combat the ever-strengthening Yen, and now it looks as if we know one of the ways the automaker plans to do so. Toyota has announced it will manufacture U.S. and Canadian-spec Yaris models in its Onnaing-Valenciennes facility in France. The plant has been producing the Yaris hatchback for European buyers since 2001, though this marks the first time in Toyota history that the automaker has built a vehicle in Europe and imported the model to the States.

North American-spec Yaris models differ slightly from their European counterparts. In addition to using different fascia designs front and rear, the NA model comes available with an automatic transmission and a market-specific 1.5-liter four-cylinder engine. There is some differentiation in safety equipment between the two models as well.

Japanese automakers have recently revealed that building cars in Japan and exporting them around the globe is quickly becoming a money-losing proposition. Honda has made it clear the company is seeking alternatives to producing models like the Fit and CR-Z in Japan due to the high costs associated with exporting the vehicles.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 15 Comments
      paulwesterberg
      • 2 Years Ago
      But, but, but,... the french they are socialists! Their nation is run on tax and spend socialism! They didn't create a business friendly environment by handing out big tax breaks to the wealthy! How can they have more jobs without any job creators!? *** Head Asplodes ***
      William Flesher
      • 2 Years Ago
      I've often longed for the day that French production cars would again be sold in the US. The smart fortwo and Toyota Yaris aren't what I had in mind.
      American Refugee
      • 2 Years Ago
      And a big thank you to the Greeks, for bringing the euro back to earth and allowing the EU to be competitive again:)
        SNP
        • 2 Years Ago
        @American Refugee
        Well, this only hurts US long term. I kinda liked the idea of EU protecting their rich by keeping the euro value so high. The greek govt is screwing themselves over with this excess. I dont even know what they make. You cant run a nation whose population is dropping 5-10% annually, with very high interest rates, high standard of living, no monetary control, and have no export other than Tourism and small boats. Greek yogurt does not count, that's culture they're pushing not an actual export.
          mapoftazifosho
          • 2 Years Ago
          @SNP
          And yet, this tiny nation that creates nothing can sink the global economy...something doesn't add up. Now, I realize that this is a very uninformed opinion, but still it doesn't add up... I realize the threat of contagion (Spain), but this focus on Greece seems so overblown...
      Letstakeawalk
      • 2 Years Ago
      Not only is the high yen an issue - Toyota also has to deal with escalating energy prices (almost 17% on corporate rates) in Japan, and with more expensive port fees (and blockades and shutdowns) on the West coast of the US. By moving more production to France, they will take advantage of cheaper energy, and have access to a wider variety of East coast ports.
        1guyin10
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Letstakeawalk
        ..and France, due to its abundant nuclear power, has the lowest power rates in Europe - comparable to rates in the US. Of course it also adds volume to a plant that needs volume since European sales are in the tank and they have to pay the workers anyway.
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Letstakeawalk
        Mexico would be an entirely new production line. This just combines production for the US with the existing production for Europe. That is usually cheaper, especially since the dire state of the European car market likely means they have spare capacity.
        SNP
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Letstakeawalk
        I think it would've been smarter to move Yaris production to Mexico. Labor/energy costs are even lower, and they can sell their excess to mexico and the rest of south america. The only way it would be smart is if France had an idle plant they could not use for anything else. Makes little sense to change from shipping it across the largest ocean in the world to shipping it across the second largest ocean. ....unless....they expect the euro to go bust in the longer term....wow...that would be incredible for the US. No more reserve currency challenger...
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Letstakeawalk
        If they don't restart their nuclear power, a lot of their industry is going to be wiped out. That is quite aside from the several dozen people who have died so far from heat exhaustion, or the thousands hospitalised. Radiation - 0, Power shortages - 26 when I checked last summer.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          They're getting some reactors back online. "Kansai Electric Power Co. has begun work to restart reactors 3 and 4 at the Ohi nuclear energy facility in Fukui prefecture. Reactor 3 reactor is scheduled to start up July 1 and reactor 4 July 17. Full power operations are expected to take a week after initial start." ...and here's something for you to chew on - your favorite: subsidizing solar and wind generation. "Reuters reports that the Japanese government’s push to subsidize new solar and wind generation will be much more costly to consumers than renewable subsidies in Germany or China. An article in Power Engineering notes a Japanese government estimate of a combined loss to the country’s utilities of $55 billion (4.4 trillion yen) if the country were to decommission all 50 of its operational nuclear reactors." http://www.enewspf.com/latest-news/latest-national/34557-nuclear-energy-institute-report-on-japans-nuclear-reactors-june-25-2012.html
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          They need their reactors up and running, but solar is not the raving insanity in Japan that it is in Germany, mainly because the bits where most people live are a long way south of Germany. That means that in Germany the difference in solar incidence winter to summer, is ten times! And that in a place where demand is very low in summer, and peaks heavily in winter! In Japan In Tokyo winter to summer the difference is more like two to one, and what is more demand in the hot weather in summer peaks much more than in winter. They could install about 20GW of solar without messing up the grid, which is about all solar achieves in Germany. That is not to say it would be cheap though, and another fact that renewables everywhere people can't get their heads around, aside from the fact that you need sunshine at about the right time of year for solar, which always amazes them, is that the sun does not shine day and night, and so this is NOT the equivalent of 20 nuclear reactors, but less than 4, albeit with a lot of power coming in very conveniently. If they want to stay solvent and stop killing people from heat prostration, they had better get their reactors back on fast though. Perhaps Germany could strip their solar from their roofs, where they have a negative net worth to the grid, and send them to Japan, where they would actually do some good. It always helps to have sunshine if you have a solar panel.
      goodoldgorr
      • 2 Years Ago
      They have a different spec ice gasoline engine because the gasoline in france and europe is not the same as the gasoline in north-america. The regular grade in na is 87 octan and the regular grade in europe is 91 octan. This is because they have different crude oil to refine.
        Vlad
        • 2 Years Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        These suckers have everything better, even crude oil!
        Mike Dimmick
        • 2 Years Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        It's nothing to do with the crude oil standard, it's just that we'd roughly standardised on the old 'four star' leaded petrol, which had a rating of 98 RON. When unleaded was introduced, to prevent the poisoning of the catalyst material in catalytic converters, compatible octane improvers hadn't reached that level, so cars were detuned slightly to run on 95 RON premium unleaded. 'Regular' unleaded petrol at 91 RON is available in some areas but it's really uncommon in the UK. The Research Octane Number is different from the method used to rate gasoline in North America, the Anti-Knock Index or Road Octane Number. 95 RON is approximately 90-91 AKI. Higher octane-rating fuel contains no more octane. It just contains more octane-rating-improvers. These actually contain *less* energy than the fuel itself. High-octane fuel can just withstand more compression without self-igniting ('knocking'). Compressing the fuel more allows you to get more energy out of the fuel, the thermal efficiency is improved. However, this has diminishing returns. Crude oil is rated as 'light' versus 'heavy' - the mix of different density hydrocarbon molecules - and 'sweet' versus 'sour' - the amount of sulphur, with less being 'sweet' and more being 'sour'. The Brent and West Texas Intermediate benchmarks are both light sweet oils, with WTI being lighter and sweeter. Petrol is made of light hydrocarbons, so the lighter the crude, the less reforming needs to be done to make it. Low sulphur content at source produces lower-sulphur output with less effort. That makes WTI a better oil for petrol than Brent. However, both benchmark oils themselves are now very rare as supplies have been used up; actual crude oil is sold at a discount to the benchmark price, because it's heavier and has more sulphur. The futures markets that trade nominal future deliveries of these benchmarks are completely fictional (actual delivery is not a requirement), but they are supposed to represent interest in supplying and receiving oil in their respective continents so the prices achieved on the futures markets are used to price over-the-counter trades.
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