Volvo is hoping to expand production into North America, and according to BusinessWeek, the Swedish automaker is currently on the search for a partnership here in the States. Ideally, this partnership would be with another manufacturer that Volvo would agree to share small car development costs with.

"In the medium term, five to six years, we need to find a proper solution in North America," Volvo CEO Stefan Jacoby said in an interview with BusinessWeek. "Building a plant in ourselves is maybe more unlikely. I'm looking for a partner that could help us utilize a North American plant."

Volvo has reportedly been in talks with a "couple" of manufacturers and is "open to everybody," Jacoby stated, later specifically cited Fiat as a possible solution, since the Italian carmaker is already active in the United States through the Chrysler Group.

In the meantime, Volvo – like many automakers – is expanding its production in China. BusinessWeek reports that Volvo's first factory in Chengdu is "on track," and will start producing cars in the second half of 2013.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 29 Comments
      kevsflanagan
      • 2 Years Ago
      Pst Volvo... talk to your one time cousin by marriage if you will Mazda. Perhaps you two could work something out and open a plant together? Volvo will bring the safety and Mazda will bring its Zoom-Zoom! Everyone wins.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Tweaker
      • 2 Years Ago
      Notice how the media studiously avoids mentioning that Volvo is now a Chinese company with a manufacturing plant in Sweden.
        Hazdaz
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Tweaker
        Yeah no kidding. Looks like EVERY article about Chrysler always brings up the fact that they are partly owned by Fiat almost as if its a bad thing (which its not, really). Yet whenever Volvo is brought up, rarely is it mentioned that they are entirely owned by the Chinese Geely car company. If Volvo is to partner with anyone, its for the main purpose of Geely getting access to 1st world engineering/manufacturing technologies which they would then implement into their Chinese factories. Whatever company eventually partners with them should be extremely leery. Ford pretty much screwed us all over by selling them 1st world car engineering for a nominal price... it would be kind of ridiculous (and scary) if now Geely gets access to 1st world manufacturing tech as well.
      NightFlight
      • 2 Years Ago
      Mazda. Both parties win.
      ROLO
      • 2 Years Ago
      how about you friend Polestar first then decide what u need to do in North America... Priority is important.
      Ben Hayat
      • 2 Years Ago
      May I suggest "Ford"? :-)
      Nowuries
      • 2 Years Ago
      BOOOO, stay away Volvo!! If car companies can learn anything from the GM--SAAB debacle, keep money-******* companies like Volvo out of your portfolio. Ford learned their lesson with Volvo already, so hopefully they won't repeat their mistake.
        Alex740
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Nowuries
        Actually Volvo was the only company in the PAG that was profitable for Ford (except for the last year), not to mention the great deal of engineering know how that Ford gained from Volvo. It's no coincidence that all of Ford's new products shot up to 5 star safety ratings after acquiring Volvo.
      BG
      • 2 Years Ago
      How about Ford? Sometimes the second time around works out.
      mattkpsu
      • 2 Years Ago
      Does anyone at Volvo corporate speak Korean? They need smaller, fuel efficient cars, better reliability, and reasonable labor costs. Hyundai needs to improve their handling and refinement, as well as convince buyers they are ready for legitimate luxury offerings.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        • 2 Years Ago
        [blocked]
        Jesus!
        • 2 Years Ago
        Actually both are doing better. Ford just did not have the money to fix Jaguar and the resty, although, some of the current Jags were created under Fords ownership.
      Scr
      • 2 Years Ago
      Remember that Volvo is Chinese owned now. Any development or technology you may have will be lifted and used against you in competition for sales. There is a damned good reason why GM would not approve the sale of SAAB when it was being bid on by Chinese companies, as all of the current models were using shared GM platforms. Ford should have never sold them, even if it meant shutting them down for a while.
        Hazdaz
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Scr
        Exactly. Partnering with Volvo is partnering with the Chinese automaker Geely and they are itching to get as much access to 1st world manufacturing technology and expertise as they possibly get their hands on. When Ford sold Volvo to the Chinese, it could have very well done more harm to the 1st world car makers than any amount of Chinese spying ever could have given them. With one fell swoop, they had access to modern Ford technology for the pittance of ~$1.5Billion.
      carcrazed4life
      • 2 Years Ago
      Subaru and Mazda come to mind (and if still alive by then, Mitsubishi, Isuzu, and Suzuki...)
        Synthono
        • 2 Years Ago
        @carcrazed4life
        Does Mitsubishi still own the DSM plant? I wonder if Volvo could get that on the cheap.
        Hazdaz
        • 2 Years Ago
        @carcrazed4life
        Subaru? Why them? They are already partly owned by Toyota and should have no good reason to link up with Volvo/Geely. Mazda probably isn't big enough. They are kind of in a similar too-small-to-move-forward position that Volvo/Geely is in.
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