At the big launch event Friday for the Tesla Model S, invited journalists were able to get just a few precious moments behind the wheel. The drives were far too short, everyone agreed (most were just 10 minutes long), but people made the best of it, including our companions over at Engadget, where Myriam Joire says, "you don't have to be a car nut to appreciate all the innovation and technology that's gone into Tesla's sophomore vehicle." She continues, "So what's it like to drive the Model S? In a word: amazing. ... The Model S is surprisingly nimble for such a large and heavy automobile, and it doesn't sacrifice ride quality for the sake of dynamics – it handled rough roads with composure and just the right amount of stiffness." Our favorite bit is this one: "Acceleration is where the Model S shines. The electric motor dishes out gobs of linear, head-snapping torque, quickly propelling you past the speed limit – you've been warned."

We're working on getting some real Autoblog seat time, but for now we look at other first impressions from around the internet, which are universally positive, something that's darn hard to come by in this day and age:
  • Motor Trend calls it, "an out-of-this-world sedan that happens to be electric" and adds that, "after a walk through the factory, a visit to a dealer showroom, and an hour-and-a-half spent driving the car on a mix of roads, my eyes are wide and my jaw has dropped."
  • CNet says that upon, "seeing a straight road ahead I ... let the pedal meet the floor. The Model S felt like a freight train, with inexorable acceleration pushing forward without a break. There were no power peaks – it was all torque all the time."
  • GigaOm says, "The low center of gravity, smooth ride, and lack of vibration were pretty amazing."
  • Yahoo! News reports that, "the Tesla Model S successfully challenges a century of assumptions about what a great car can be" and that, "from behind the wheel of the Tesla Model S, you feel you're driving the future, instead of burning increasingly limited gallons of the past."
  • Our old friend Damon Lavrinc, now at Wired, says, "if our brief seat time is any indication, Tesla hasn't just delivered a functional, all-electric sedan – it's made a luxury EV that can outpace and outclass the stalwarts of the premium sports sedan segment, while changing the perceptions of electric mobility. It's also a complete hoot to drive."
  • USA Today makes it simple: "There's no other way to put it: Tesla's Model S luxury sedan is spectacular."
What you read there, in other words, is a paradigm being shifted. We've got some video reviews below.







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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 183 Comments
      Kurt
      • 2 Years Ago
      What will happen to all the car mechanics in the future? This thing has an all aluminum chassis-it will never rust. No engine, driveshaft, or multi-gear transmission-less moving parts. Even the brakes and pads are going to take very little wear because of the heavy brake regen that will almost take you to a stop. Damn I love the future.
        Rotation
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Kurt
        Aluminum does corrode, and chassis rust isn't really the primary thing mechanics work on. Driveshafts really aren't either. This 4700lb car, regardless of regen, will need brake pads regularly.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Kurt
        They'll have to evolve. Cars still get in accidents. AC systems break down, cooling systems need maintenance, tires wear out, and most importantly batteries don't last forever. The future is even more uncertain than it was 5 years ago simply due to the success of EVs and PHEVs. The mechanics of the future will not only need standard ICE training, but they'll need to be well versed in EV & PHEV technology. This will likely result in specialization, much the same way heavy duty vehicles (dump trucks, earthmovers, etc.) have specialized mechanics to service them.
        Ford Future
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Kurt
        They don't do tuneup's now. - Exhaust systems last at least 10 years. - Tires are still there. - State Inspections. - You can hand wind an electric motor to improve it, but TESLA has already done so. As cars get old, things are going to break, they always do, after 5 years or more.
        Chris M
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Kurt
        Remember the "Lonely Maytag Repairman" ads? Well, maybe we'll see some "Lonely Tesla Mechanic" ads...
        Spec
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Kurt
        Well . . . they'll need to replace battery cells now & then. Various moving parts will need replacement (tires, springs, shocks, brakes, etc.). But yeah, maintenance should be easier.
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Kurt
        Those mechanics will have to learn a bit about electronics or die out as a species :P There will definitely be a lot less to fix!
        Ryan
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Kurt
        Yup. We are at a crossroads in society. One path leads us to less work, but lets the machines improve everyone's lives. The other path leads to 50%-90% unemployment and unless you run a large company you won't be able to survive. You don't need oil workers, coal miners or the EPA if people installed fairly large solar arrays. People and politicians don't want to talk about it, but we need to come up with a real plan for how society can be better with most people not working. Rightfully, there is a big problem with workers feeling that 'slackers' are getting the good life for nothing. It will have to be dealt with fairly.
          Kurt
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Ryan
          Politicians or their financially connected institutions cannot fix this problem because urgent assertive action needs to be taken. That would require what the citizens of this country refer to as "authoritarian government" and that is un-american. The only thing that will end this current socioeconomic environment is mass extinctions (hopefully not) or some private sector social engineering. Social engineering is actually a good thing because real engineers recognize that their solutions cannot solve every problem in every situation.
          super390
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Ryan
          Life's not been that good for a long time now. Inflation-adjusted wages are no better now than they were in 1980. At that time household consumption continued to rise as if nothing had changed, keeping the economy growing by wiping out household savings. We now have smaller families, but far more 2-earner families, and even 2-job heads of households, which create the illusion of a higher standard of living. Science fiction writers were warning in the 1950s and '60s that automation would create a social crisis; they could hardly even imagine offshoring. The corporate response to that warning is the nighmare we've been living in, designed to boil us slowly, like frogs. True fact: in the 1960s a government-funded think tank produced a study claiming that society could continue to function with unemployment rates of up to 90%. The unemployment rate was about 5% then. Why was this study commissioned?
      Dave D
      • 2 Years Ago
      Freakin Awesome! I can't wait to see what the nay-sayers come up with on this one LOL
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dave D
        Oh god. I remember when me and Dan F. were the only electric car supporting commenters, 4-5 years ago. Oh, and Neil Blanchard, but he didn't post much. I remember hearing that an electric car would never work out sooooo many times.. Those people are eating their hats now. And we are handing out condiments to assist that process.
          2 Wheeled Menace
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          Hah.. just been trying to combat ignorance for a long time, is all.
          Joeviocoe
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          What is this? A reunion?
          Grendal
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          You're an early EV blog commenting adopter. Thanks for your contribution. :-)
          PR
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          Yea, I was posting 5 years ago as Nixon back on the comments system, and remember all the brainless "vaporware" posts like it was yesterday. Now all the "vaporware" idiots have morphed from claiming that since there aren't any for sale today (2007) that EV's would never be for sale. Now they've morphed into saying that since there are only limited numbers for sale today, that there will never be mass production. Same trolls, same tactic, different words.
          Ar-Rafio Khan
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          Dan F. as in Dan Frederiksen? Wow...he seems to be anti-EV to me....he gets down-voted on every comment he makes...and the comments aren't EV-friendly(usually)
          2 Wheeled Menace
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          Ahhhhh evsuperhero, you are still around here.. awesome! Maybe it is time to sell that corvette.. ;D
          EVSUPERHERO
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          You are a superhero! ; 0 With Tesla, the EV has arrived! It will make believers of the nonbelievers. How long can I go before braking down and ordering the cheapest S? The range ain't much more than what I have now, but oh the ride, the acceleration, the prestige, the power... They say it pulls pretty hard. I read, if I ordered now, it would not get here till May of 2013.
          Dave D
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          LOL I started commenting in late 2008 when you were still Neptronix! I remember that. I didn't comment as much back then, but I was an EV advocate as soon as I joined. :-)
          Dave D
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          Hey PR, I didn't know you were "Nixon". I've seen you posting on here for years too. I guess some folks changed their monikers when they brought on the new commenting system.
        Electron
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dave D
        Wait until Top Gear's dumb&dumber (Clarkson and May) get their hands on one of these and do their obligatory shot of EVs being pushed in a scene where they stage being out of juice. Today is for the fans, tomorrow the haters will start their attack on Tesla's success.
        Anne
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dave D
        Go over to Jalopnik and see them squirm and writhe.
      Mr. Sunshine
      • 2 Years Ago
      Until Tesla's $40k battery pack drops to $10k, I think all car makers should avoid the low end EV market. It's just more cost effective to make a luxury EV. The markup from all luxury components can greatly offset the price of the battery. I wished GM took this route to begin with. If it had developed Volt as a Cadillac from the start, it would have been better received. It probably would have sold the same amount of ELRs as Volts with the same level of economy of scale. The benefits of a mass market Chevy Volt would be realized after the initial Cadillac launch smoothed out.
        Anne
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Mr. Sunshine
        Thanks a lot, dude. And I was so looking forward to driving my ZOE a year from now! But now they will listen to your advise and cancel it. Why do you have to take away the pleasure from the people with the shallow pockets? Thanks again very much.
          Timo
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Anne
          @Anne, you will get one which is much better in just couple of years. Low end approach is wrong only now when battery prices are still high, but critical price/capacity is very very close for making that approach useful too. I think 2015 you can get good 300+ mile range car in less than $50k. Leaf-like city car for $15k. @DaveMart, I thought they canceled Zoe. If they didn't the delay might be deliberate. I kind of liked Zoe concept, only the price-tag was too high for a small city car like that. Bottom line: I believe low-end approach is wrong *now*, but it will not be for long. Tesla has timed their master plan perfectly. Low-volume high-end sport car, then a bit more affordable high-volume premium car and then the very high volume affordable car for everybody.
          Marcopolo
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Anne
          @ Anne, Buy your Zoe, and drive it in good health with pleasure! I congratulate you on your choice of personal transport. At least you are proving your principles as you drive. The best advertisement for EV's are EV owners. Well done!
          Anne
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Anne
          @Timo, I want electric car! Even if it sucks ;) Who cares if you don't like the current offering of cheap EV's? Then don't buy one. There were 28,000 people that thought the LEAF was worth its money. Aren't consumers allowed to make up their own minds?
          Timo
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Anne
          I agree with Mr. Sunshine. The low-end approach only produces expensive golf carts and very limited city cars at current battery prices. You cannot get cheap, useful BEV with reasonable price unless it is high-end car, but at there this is what you get. Bigger battery means more power, more range, more everything. All those tiny Think City -golf cart -like cars just hurt BEV reputation and slow down the revolution. It's good they canceled Zoe. Wait three years and Tesla makes you a car that blows that concept away. Then they are forced to rethink it and re-introduce it (maybe with different name).
          DaveMart
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Anne
          @Timo: 'It's good they canceled Zoe' e-mail Renault with this news, as they don't know they cancelled it. You have big Golf carts around your way, if they can hold 5 people. Extensive golf links, too, if you need to travel 125 miles to get around them.
        Mart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Mr. Sunshine
        Good reason to believe they're able to get $400-$500 per kWh now. http://wheels.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/06/25/tesla-model-s-offers-a-lesson-in-electric-vehicle-economics/ A $10k/20kWh pack would be fine in a two-seat urban commuter around 2000 lbs or (preferably) less.
      Scambuster
      • 2 Years Ago
      Finally, quality, innovation and leadership from an American car company! The Old-Farts from Detroit could never have produce such a spectacular car despite deep pockets, established design studio and engineering. Tesla has proved that the Old Farts at GM, Ford, and former Chrysler are brain-dead. Too bad nobody burnt or buried them decades ago.
        Grendal
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Scambuster
        Tesla is fresh and innovative. Detroit has come up with plenty of new ideas and concepts. But they're big massive corporation steeped in lots of bureaucracy that aren't about to suddenly switch from what works. Tesla is paving the way for EV's and GM has already credited them with inspiring the Volt. The Volt was GM's brainchild and it is an excellent car in its own right. So not brain dead, but usually unwilling to take extreme risks.
          theflew
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Grendal
          @Nick, The difference is no one expects Tesla to be making a profit, giving dividends, increasing marketshare, etc... as they expect a mature automotive company. Tesla is playing a make it or break it game that BMW, GM, Ford, Audi even Nissan aren't willing to go all in on. Also building an electric car isn't really rocket science and all the manufactures could easily do it, but the market is still unknown even to Tesla.
          Nick
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Grendal
          Grendal That's correct, but: Sometimes taking half-hearted risks is more risky than going all the way like Tesla. The Volt is an exceptional car, but it isn't an icon strong enough to give a high-tech image to GM. Tesla on the other hand is now on top of the world in terms of brand image.
          Anne
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Grendal
          @theflew "one expects Tesla to be [...]increasing marketshare," I beg to differ. They got 0.001% marketshare in June. :)
        goodoldgorr
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Scambuster
        I prefer the volt from gm then the tesla model s, even the 77 000$ model with the 265 miles range. Probably the battery from the volt will last longer been back-up from an electrical generator before it goes empty and goes brick. Also the volt now is proven reliable and not yet the tesla. The volt is the only green car of all the new tech green car because green mean also been able to move forward at any given time like a green traffic light and not the tesla, the tesla is green for a limited time then it goes red or brick. Remember it's basically the same battery as the roadster that bricked 5 times.
          Spec
          • 2 Months Ago
          @goodoldgorr
          Hey, gorr said something reasonable!
          Anne
          • 2 Months Ago
          @goodoldgorr
          @Spec, Reasonable? Your words, not mine. @gorr, Model S has different cells than the Roadster. And it has better protection against 'bricking'. If it is left unplugged for a long period (which the manual CLEARLY states you should NOT do), this will happen: "For example, a Model S battery parked with 50 percent charge would approach full discharge only after about 12 months. Model S batteries also have the ability to protect themselves as they approach very low charge levels by going into a “deep sleep” mode that lowers the loss even further. A Model S will not allow its battery to fall below about 5 percent charge. At that point the car can still sit for many months. Of course you can drive a Model S to 0 percent charge, but even in that circumstance, if you plug it in within 30 days, the battery will recover normally." These two batteries are very different beasts.
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 2 Months Ago
      it's possible but that would not be my guess. you see they had something like 2000 preorders for the roadster as well. which turned into around 500 sales the first year. granted a big recession hit but I still would expect some cold feet. it's one thing to get excited, another to spend 70k$ from a car maker that may not be here next year. so you are guessing near 15k for the first year. care to guess about second year?
      Actionable Mango
      • 2 Months Ago
      So tired of your crap. Make me a 600kg Tesla Model S for pennies and I'll buy one, or else STFU.
      noevfud
      • 2 Years Ago
      Anne, you are wrong again on this topic. Do you own a medium range EV in an area with hills?. It's all about weight and Aero and Dan is usually right about most of his EV comments it's just that people don't like his delivery at times. The truth hurts Anne. I have owned factory and EV conversations for more than ten years, and you? The answer is it depends!
      Marcopolo
      • 2 Years Ago
      @Anne " Who cares about weight? Can you stop it please?" Oh, Anne, you are just the latest in a long line who have pleaded with DF, only to realize he is a very persistent little troll. It sad to watch you trying the same rational approach taken by,..Oh, so many others, alas without success.
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 2 Months Ago
      I just don't think that's true. VW doesn't start with one golf per day production and slowly ramp up over 3 months do they? ever seen GM launch a malibu with 10 cars worldwide? and 1 per day production. and the press driving the CEO's car. the only other time I've seen such sluggishness is GM on the Volt
      Rotation
      • 2 Years Ago
      Dave R: Yes, it is. I didn't say it was a conversion. But it is a modified gas car platform. The chassis (cradle) in a FWD car doesn't extend rearward enough to get to the battery. You're thinking of the unibody. The LEAF platform is not completely custom, it is the same platform slightly altered that is in other Nissans. It dictated the basic shape amongst other things. It's not a crime, my Audi A6 was on the same platform as an A4 and a VW Passt.
      Nick
      • 2 Years Ago
      Now all the anti-ev automakers are shivering with fear. They just realized that they're about a decade behind and will have a hard time catching up. Tesla really showed the world how amazing EVs can be. We owe Elon Musk for this.
        Marco Polo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Nick
        @Nick, "Now all the anti-ev automakers are shivering with fear" Not really Nick ! firstly there are no 'anti-EV automakers. There are Automakers who either don't have the resources or the interest to build EV's but that doesn't make them anti-EV. The world auto-market is 70 million plus per year. Tesla is a small EV maker selling a luxury product with a hopeful production run of 10,000 per year. 10,000 is so tiny, it doesn't register. Even in the US with sales of 10 million, its still only 0.01 ! But, it's still a great achievement !
          Grendal
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Marco Polo
          "10,000 per year" The Model S production capacity is 20,000 per year and the Model X is estimated at 15,000. All the S lines are there and ready for the 20K capacity. I haven't heard if the Model X will need a seperate line or that it will be an expansion of the Model S line. I'd guess they will need to buy more stamping machines and more robots at the very least. I understand the point you were making. It's similar to the point I posted at the top of this thread that the major auto makers aren't inept either. As long as Tesla isn't cutting into their markets in a major threatening way they aren't going to be "shivering in fear." I'm sure they're curious how this, as they view them, little company pans out. If Tesla succeeds big (150-200K sales) with the Mass Market/BlueStar/Gen III car, then you will see a big reaction from them. Still probably not animosity and fear but creating something of their own to grab some of that market back from Tesla. At that point, the world will take notice of what an upstart little EV company has achieved.
          Marcopolo
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Marco Polo
          @ PR, It's sad when ego's need to resort to puerile name calling, to bolster a proposition they evidently know very little about. (Compare your reply, with Grendal). There is a huge difference in taking 8 years and nearly 3 billion dollars, to produce expensive, low volume, specialist luxury EV, and trying to mass-produce hundreds of thousands of vehicles, in different models! (although, Tesla could JV with an OEM ). The business logistics are very different. A JVC, is a different story, Tesla brings the product, the OEM, provideds the industrial infrastructure and shares the capital cost. Waffling on with jargon and impressive sounding argot, may fool the rubes and evangelical EV fans, but it's just meaningless word salad ! Once Tesla commits to producing an economy priced vehicle, with low profit margins, that's when Elon Musk will discover the downside of Auto-manufacture. Volume automobile production, is a high risk, low profit, high overhead, very capital intensive business. I' m really impressed by Elon Musk's self taught industrial knowledge. He's a truly remarkable businessman. But the major auto-builders also know a little about building vehicles. Tesla has two great weaknesses, that are also it's strengths. One is Elon Musk. He is Tesla ! That's a great asset, but a single heart beat could change everything! The other is the ability to raise capital on a declining market. Again, only the magic of Elon Musk's reputation underwrites Tesla capital raising capacity. A down turn in the PRC, (predicted) and a slow European recovery would dry up investment capital, while driving down oil prices. The Model S sells to people who are wealthy enough to not care about the economy, but the middle and lower classes, will not be in the market for an EV ! The choice for most people between a Tesla SUV, EV and a cheaper Mitsubishi, etc SUV EREV, with the same basic EV capacity, but added EREV capacity, will curtail Tesla's sales. The OEM's must be very grateful to Elon Musk, he's carrying all the risk, spending considerable amount of capital to create an EV market. Brand loyalty is a thing of the past (except on these pages) Joe Public will buy his next car based on his personal motives and whims at the time of purchase. Of course I also haven't mentioned the possible competition to EV's from FCV's or even bio-fuel ! For most major automakers, the jury's still out as to which technology is more viable. But, in the end, it's all about money ! Before Tesla can grow to be threat to the OEM's, Elon will need to raise $50-100 billion of investment capital, not loans! He's a remarkable man, and just might do it ! But, it's far from certain that Elon Musk will take that route, it would make more sense to JVC. 20,000 even 50,000 thousand Tesla's a year, is of no concern to the OEM's, but a Toyota Tesla, that's a whole different ball game !
          PR
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Marco Polo
          Right Marco, because Tesla will only ever build 1 model of car, and will never have other lines of cars, so they will never sell more than the 10K projected Model S sales, right? Unlike you, the car makers who are used to multi-year model planning can see farther than just what is in front of their faces. Tesla has a number of future models planned for release that will just keep adding to that 10K per year number you are stuck on. With a new model scheduled pretty much every year for the next few years, auto makes know when the gauntlet has been thrown down. They know what the value of Market Sector Leadership is to future sales numbers, and that it can take a decade or more to turn something like that around. Yes, the folks in charge who plan out vehicle model lines measured by the decade certainly are standing up and taking notice. Because it isn't just a question of the 10K Model S sales, it is a question of branding for the future and competing over the long term that is at stake. The silly thing is that you know all this. You know each and every Tesla release that they have made public. But since I've just told you stuff that you already know, you will certainly respond with some completely dumb-@ass response just because it is me who posts it. Poor knee-jerk Marco.
          Grendal
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Marco Polo
          And that's not to say they aren't noticing what Tesla has done now with the Model S. I just don't see them changing any of the things they are already doing now. Which is, I think, the point you trying to make as well.
        Anne
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Nick
        He could even launch a Model S into space if he wanted to!
          goodoldgorr
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Anne
          He can't launch the model s in space right now because the electricity in space come from a fuelcell and the tesla is just powered by a battery that fear cold.
          Chris M
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Anne
          Yeah, but that would be silly. There are no roads to drive on up there. However, for a real BIG publicity stunt, he could launch one into orbit, bring it back down, and sell it as as the first car in space! That would really be a one-of-a-kind collectible.
          Anne
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Anne
          @theflew, It's actually not the size, that can be fixed by a large enough nosecone. It is mass that is important. Dragon's dry mass is 4200 kg. Musk could actually launch 2 Model S'es in one go.
          theflew
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Anne
          Actually SpaceX doesn't have a rocket large enough to hold a car yet :-)
      Rotation
      • 2 Years Ago
      At this price, I don't see paradigms shifting just yet. You are talking about a $100K car they're driving. I'm sure those who buy it will be impressed though.
        Dave R
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Rotation
        While most of the cars that are being tested are optioned out to $90-100k, you can get the same basic car for a fraction of that cost under $60k before rebates. It will have half the range and won't accelerate quite as quickly, but aside from that you're getting the same basic vehicle that is getting rave reviews. The Model S is laying the ground work for their true mass production EV which Tesla is already hard at work creating. The fact that Tesla appears to have built a car with no glaring faults and on schedule in their first real mass production EV at a price point that is competitive with it's gas-powered counterparts is amazing.
          Rotation
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dave R
          thomas: There's more to performance than just 0-60. The performance ratings on the 40kWh and 60kWh models are not the same as the 85kWh non-performance model. There are no non-air suspension Teslas right now. They won't deliver any without that option until 2013. So that's a mandatory $1500 option right now.
          thomas
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dave R
          actually it will accelerate as quickly: only car there that was the performance edition was elon's car which endgaget and some other dude on youtube got to drive :) The car (asside from the air suspension that is) is just the same; it's like a macbook pro: everyone has the same unibody (also alluminium mind you :p) but the inside varies with price; i like that a lot! Go tesla.
          Ford Future
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dave R
          Exactly. The Mid-Level Model is a REAL Bargain.
          Rotation
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dave R
          All the cars being tested are $90K+. At $50K (after rebate) you do get the same basic vehicle, but it's a lot more basic. Especially when compared to its competition. Obviously though, even at $100K these vehicles are a big step. They just aren't the one that's going to turn the corner.
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Rotation
        $100k car? i think you're talking about the Karma. This car starts at $50k after "incentives". http://www.teslamotors.com/models/options No, it won't be making a paradigm shift any time soon, BUT go compare it to an internal combustion car in it's class. It is a totally killer value compared to similarly sized luxury cars. I predict that BMW, Audi, Infiniti, Acura, Cadillac etc. are gonna feel a sting in the sales of their larger cars soon.
          Rotation
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          PR: The slowest one isn't 5.9. You're telling me there's no noticeable difference between 5.6s 0-60 and 6.5s 0-60. You're nuts. Yes, agree all 3 of those are Mustangs. But no one drives the Mustang GT500 and then writes up their results as a review of the V6 model.
          Rotation
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          2WM: I'm quoting the price of the models actually reviewed here. That's why I said 'You are talking about a $100K car they're driving.' Stop trying to twist my words to make me wrong. When a Civic is reviewed, no one reviews the high performance model and then states that this is representative of the base model. And no 40kWh model will have the same performance as these 85kWh models, even the non-performance ones. Tesla even acknowledges this on their site.
          PR
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          Rotation -- Ooopps! I misread your earlier post, and got the numbers wrong! My mistake. You are right that 5.6 and 6.5 are different enough to feel in every day driving, where 5.6 vs 5.9 would be a lot tougher to distinguish.
          thomas
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          @Rotation: it is the same car dude; the difference lies in battery pack and options that's all: the drive is going to feel just the same; and yes the performance edition is faster but the majority of those test car's where not performance editions; check the reviews. And in what why is a signiture version of this car better than the rest? No other than having the words founder on them and having them early. What you are saying is not correct; for 50k you get this car add anther 4k for the air suspension and some options and you have an excellent car...
          Rotation
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          None of these they are driving/reviewing are anywhere near $50K. They are $100K cars. Go check the pricing. 10,000 cars per year worldwide in lost sales is not going to sting BMW, Audi or Cadillac.
          2 Wheeled Menace
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          *looking at pricing* "The base Model S with a 40 kW·h battery pack starts at US$57,400 up to US$77,400 depending on battery size and before any government subsidies." You're quoting the price based off of a limited edition top end model that is like approx. $30k more. That is like saying that the Honda Civic will never succeed at a cost of $29k.. and carefully leaving out the fact that said Civic had every single option checked.. ( carefully leaving out the fact that the base car only costs about $16k )
          PR
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          Rotation -- I dare you to take a normal test drive on city streets, and compare the 60 and the 85 back-to-back while blindfolded, and be able to feel the difference between 5.6 and 5.9 second 0-60 performance. You will be hard pressed to figure out which car is which. And if you just drive 40 miles in each car, you will have no idea which has the longer range battery. The performance difference exists, but I think it is exaggerated. It isn't any different than Ford offering a Mustang with a strong V6, a slightly stronger V8, and a performance V8. It's still a Mustang.... PS -- watch out for the telephone poles while driving blindfolded....
          Rotation
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          thomas: No, it is not the same car. 40 kWh model: 6.5 seconds to 60, 1/4 mile unspecified, HP unspecified, top speed 110mph. 60 kWh model: 5.9 seconds to 60, 1/4 mile unspecified, HP unspecified, top speed 120mph. 85 kWh model: 5.6 seconds to 60, 1/4 mile 13.7secs, HP 362, top speed 125mph. 85 kWh perf model: 4.4 seconds to 60, 1/4 mile 12.6 secs, HP 416, top speed 130mph. So no, the performance isn't the same if you only spend $50K. It'd be like reviewing a Civic Si and then saying that means the HF model drives the same.
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