There's an old problem on the law book that has hindered plug-in vehicle adoption in the U.S.: figuring out who has the rights to sell electricity. Traditionally, in many areas, only utilities have that right because of, we've heard, unscrupulous landlords who overcharged their tenants. Of course, if you're a landlord today who wants to install an electric vehicle charging station, how do you legally sell your tenants the juice? Colorado has an answer.

A new state law will take effect in August whereby, for $5,000, you can get a permit to sell electricity at a vehicle recharging station. Given that around 1,200 EVs are registered in the state, Governor John Hickenlooper says the new law will encourage more businesses to install vehicle chargers. The Denver Post reports that there are around 60 charging stations in the state ("most" of them currently free), including 40 at various Walgreens. Dave Altman, regional development and government sales chief for Eaton, told the paper that he expects $1-an-hour battery charging to become a reality soon.

Earlier this month, Audi released a video about the e-tron pilot project featuring the plug-in A3 hatchback in Colorado. There's also a federal program, Fostering Electric Vehicle Expansion in the Rockies (FEVER) that, well, the name describes what it's about.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 9 Comments
      russellbgeister
      • 3 Years Ago
      i can see it now spend x number of dollars and get a free charge
      PR
      • 3 Years Ago
      Per hour charging is a pretty interesting prospect. Because some cars can draw way more power than other cars in an hour. So how much you are paying per unit of electricity would change drastically depending upon your car's charge rate. It will be interesting to see how this all plays out, because right now I'm not sure why someone would pay to charge considering all the places that offer charging for free as a way to attract customers as an advertising expense.
      Penn State EcoCAR 2
      • 3 Years Ago
      In PA one of the biggest complaints we hear is that there's not enough charging stations in the first place - regardless whether or not they cost money. I've heard people who have long commutes say they'd buy a plug in if there were charging stations at their offices. Since there aren't, they would be forced to drive home using gas everyday and they don't think they'd save a lot.
      Mart
      • 3 Years Ago
      "A new state law will take effect in August whereby, for $5,000, you can get a permit to sell electricity at a vehicle recharging station. Given that around 1,200 EVs are registered in the state, Governor John Hickenlooper says the new law will encourage more businesses to install vehicle chargers." It's hard to see how a $5,000 fee will "encourage" business--especially if the permit must be renewed.
        DarylMc
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Mart
        It sound like a bit of a joke really. $5000 permit cost to the reseller is hardly in the interest of keeping users costs down. Perhaps they could have a $5000 permit for solar panels to encourage widespread adoption and lower costs as well.
      Nick
      • 3 Years Ago
      $1 / hour sounds like it would be cheaper than the cost of the electricity, no?
        mustang_sallad
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Nick
        depends. At 3.3kW, not at all, 0.33$/kWh is about as high as it gets. At 6.7kW, like the Focus Electric, more like $0.16/kWh, much more reasonable, but definitely not the cheapest on the continent. Most stations I've seen cap out around 30A/240V, so that's about as good as it gets, although J1772 allows up to 80A.
          Dave
          • 3 Years Ago
          @mustang_sallad
          From what I've googled, it seems that Colorado electricity costs about 8 cents per kwh. If the charger costs $13,500 installed (taking the average from a recent ABG article) 6.7 kw: $13,500 / $.08 = 168,750 kwh to pay for the charger, or 25,186 hours of charge time. 3.3 kw: $13,500 / $.25 = 54,000 kwh to pay for the charger or 16,363 hours of charge time. Its probably not going to be a moneymaker.
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