The Big Apple is about to get a little greener.

New York State and the federal government will invest $4.4 million building out 325 electric-vehicle charging stations across the state, many of which are expected to be in the largest U.S. city.

The state's Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and the U.S. Department of Energy are teaming up on the project, which will provide funding to 10 companies and municipalities. Among the recipients of the funding will by Coulomb Technologies, which will receive $1 million to deploy 81 stations; the New York Power Authority, which will get almost $1 million to install 124 stations at bus and train depots; and the New York Port Authority, which will get $720,000 to install EV charging stations for fleet vehicles.

"Creating an infrastructure to accommodate electric vehicles will create jobs and new economic development across the state, while reducing our carbon footprint and helping protect the environment," New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said in a statement earlier this month.

NYSERDA will also oversee a $10 million fund that offers vouchers – for as much as $20,000 per vehicle – to companies that buy plug-in commercial trucks. About three-quarters of the state's oil use stems from transportation, according to the NYSERDA.

New York State currently accounts for 428 of the more than 10,000 electric-vehicle charging stations across the country, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. California has almost 2,400 stations, while Texas and Washington State each have more than 800.
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Governor Cuomo Announces Deployment of 325 Electric Vehicle Charging Stations Across New York State
$4.4 Million Investment Creates New Jobs, Lowers Fossil Fuels, and Cuts Toxic Emissions

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced that $4.4 million has been awarded to ten companies, municipalities and other entities to enable more than 325 new electric-vehicle (EV) charging stations to be installed across New York State.

New York State's electric-vehicle charging stations are supported by a joint effort by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA)'s Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Demonstration Program and the U.S. Department of Energy.

With high gas prices, EVs provide a fuel-efficient alternative to gas- and diesel-powered vehicles while helping reduce the nation and state's dependence on fossil fuels. A diverse infrastructure of EV charging stations will create new jobs and business opportunities across the state, as well as helping promote the sale of electric cars, trucks and other vehicles.

"With New Yorkers facing higher prices at the pump, the state is stepping up to make owning an electric vehicle an affordable and convenient option," Governor Cuomo said. "Creating an infrastructure to accommodate electric vehicles will create jobs and new economic development across the state, while reducing our carbon footprint and helping protect the environment."

New York's transportation sector has considerable potential for energy efficiency. Transportation makes up about three-fourths of the state's oil consumption, and nearly 40 percent of the state's greenhouse gas emissions.

Francis J. Murray Jr., President and CEO of NYSERDA, said, "Electric vehicles offer a cleaner alternative to combustion engines, helping reduce the consumption of fossil fuels and the emission of greenhouse gases. NYSERDA supports the Governor's continued leadership in creating an electric-vehicle future in New York State, and advancing technology that will not only stimulate the economy but lessen our impact on the environment."

Last year, NYSERDA received a $1 million U.S. Department of Energy grant on behalf of the Transportation and Climate Initiative, a collaboration of the transportation, energy, and environment agencies of 11 Northeast states and Washington, DC to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. The goal of the initiative is to accelerate the introduction of EV charging stations throughout the Northeast making the region a hub for electric vehicles through public and private partnerships. President Barack Obama has called for 1 million plug-in vehicles to be on the street nationwide by 2015.

U.S. Senator Charles Schumer said, "Sky-high gas prices and tight budgets have left many New Yorkers struggling at the pump, but there is hope in new technology, like electric cars, that can free us from our dependence on foreign oil. By finally making electric cars more accessible to the general public, we are taking a huge step towards giving consumers another viable and affordable transportation option, and I'm proud to have fought for money for this program from the U.S. Department of Energy."

U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand said, "In this tough economy we need a do-it-all approach that expands our energy portfolio to provide middle class New Yorkers with relief at the pump. By creating an infrastructure for electric vehicles, we can cut energy costs, cut pollution to protect the air we breathe, and reduce our dependence on foreign oil which strengthens our national security."

U.S. Representative Eliot Engel, a senior member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, said, "America needs to end our dependence on foreign oil, and our reliance on such hostile nations as Iran and Venezuela to power our cars and homes. Alternative technologies exist, such as electric cars, and their widespread use will go a long way towards ending this reliance. I am the author of the Open Fuel Standard Act, (along with Rep. John Shimkus, R-IL) that would require 50 percent of new automobiles in 2014, 80 percent in 2016, and 95 percent in 2017, to operate on nonpetroleum fuels in addition to or instead of petroleum based fuels. Between electric cars and alternative fuels, we can eventually reach a point where we no longer have to put money in the coffers of our enemies."

U.S. Representative Paul Tonko, who is also the former President and CEO of NYSERDA, said, "Drivers across New York, and indeed the nation, are sick and tired of giving tax breaks to Big Oil companies while at the same time paying record prices at the pump. One competitive alternative is electric vehicles. I applaud Governor Cuomo for installing these new charging stations and for partnering with the federal government to advance clean energy technology, create jobs and provide drivers options they so urgently deserve."

NYSERDA will also be managing a $10 million fund that offers vouchers of up to $20,000 per vehicle for the purchase of EV commercial trucks weighing more than 10,000 pounds.

EV charging station projects announced today include:

Access Technology Integration Inc. – Plans to install charging stations with innovative reservation and payment systems at seven locations around the Albany area, including St. Peter's Hospital, Albany-Rensselaer Train Station, Times Union Center, universities, supermarkets, and other locations. NYSERDA funding: $244,000.

Beam Charging LLC – Company will install a total of 28 charging stations, each one in a separate public parking garage around Manhattan, for the purpose of gathering data to determine how well such charging stations are used. $400,000.

Car Charging Group Inc. – Plans to install charging stations at up to 15 high-traffic locations in New York City, directed toward apartment dwellers who do not have parking at home. Sites would go in parking garages that are used primarily for monthly parking. NYSERDA funding: $200,000.

City of Rochester – Plans to install 24 charging stations at seven highly-visible and busy locations around the city, including municipal parking garages, City Hall, the Port of Rochester and the Rochester Public Market. NYSERDA funding: $228,000.

Coulomb Technologies Inc. – Partnering with National Grid, Coulomb will deploy 81 dual charging stations with Coulomb's ChargePoint software. The technology will demonstrate a web-based demand response program, a new low-cost installation method and a customized reservation system. NYSERDA funding: $1 million.

EV Connect Inc. – Plans to install EV charging stations at five Marriott hotels around New York State that make use of a unique reservation and payment system. Project would make it possible for overnight visitors to charge their vehicles while staying at a hotel. NYSERDA funding: $250,000.

Golub Corp. (Price Chopper Supermarkets) -- Plans to install 12 charging stations at four locations, each equipped with a weather canopy and lighting to make them visible. This is the first phase of an intended statewide rollout. NYSERDA funding: $325,000.

New York Port Authority – Plans to install seven experimental charging stations for fleet vehicles and public use that practice demand-response (aligning charging times with times of low power demands, reducing charging cost and impact during peak demand to the grid). NYSERDA funding: $720,000.

New York Power Authority –Plans to install 124 charging stations at train and bus stations, airports and municipal parking lots. Three sites would be powered in part through on-site solar power. NYSERDA funding: $989,000.

Plugin Stations Online – Plans to install charging stations at three apartment complexes in Albany, Rochester and Buffalo, as well as one at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. NYSERDA funding: $64,000.

Another round of the program is currently underway with proposals due July 25, 2012. Visit PON 2301 - Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (ESVE) Demonstration and Support Program for more information.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 62 Comments
      goodoldgorr
      • 3 Years Ago
      This will be a mismatch of level 2 and level 3 charging with innadapted standards, nobody will use them and in 2 to 3 years they will get dismantle.
        Anne
        • 6 Months Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        +1 Thanks for the good laugh, I needed that!
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 3 Years Ago
      I assume those are level 2. also known as a glorified extension cords. 13k$ a pop. good work if you can get it. should be fast chargers at that price
      Bill Fracalossi
      • 3 Years Ago
      How about a solution in valet-type parking garages where attendants move your cars to and from charging stations as completed throughout the day, opening them up for new folks needing a charge. A new profit center for garages (as if they need one) and multiple charges per unit per day.
        Marco Polo
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Bill Fracalossi
        Bill Fracalossi Sounds good Bill, but in reality, such an idea would be totally uneconomic.
      Joeviocoe
      • 6 Months Ago
      LTAW, there is a BIG difference between "gasoline infrastructure in the early 1900's", "today's EVs and their public charging infrastructure".... and Hydrogen Fueling infrastructure. In the early 1900's, cars were new things. Not many had them and most transportation was by horse. All roads, paths, and expectation of travel was by horse. So a car was MUCH more functional than any horse. So demand for gasoline could grow slowly, and at pace with the adoption of automobiles. Today, the majority of travel is by car. And expectation for travel is by car. Any new car tech, such as BEV or FCV would not be more functional than what is currently available. So it's adoption is not based on new or higher function, but only on demand for cheaper, cleaner operation. Much slower adoption rate than the early 1900's. In contrast to both early gas cars and FCVs, because neither gasoline or hydrogen can be made at home, BEVs don't require any public infrastructure to get adoption started. So BEV numbers can grow at a slow but steady pace, and the public infrastructure can grow along at a slow pace as well. Today, most people won't buy a single FCV unless the fueling stations are already build and operational. At least enough stations spread out over their commuting area to make sure that one can be reached in 5 or 10 minutes when they get the low fuel warning. This is in stark contrast to the early days of automobiles... since their function already far exceeded a horse, drivers were more than happy to purchase gasoline in small quantities at a pharmacy and only drive short distances.
      Dave
      • 6 Months Ago
      And, in truth, level 3 charger installations should be avoided. If they become commonplace, they will be a serious strain on the grid since they are likely to be used during daytime / peak hours rather than at night when BEV charging should happen.
      JakeY
      • 6 Months Ago
      @Letstakeawalk @Elmo Biggins @Joeviocoe Let's try to keep the hydrogen talk back in the hydrogen articles. We don't need every single article to be a 100+ comment argument about hydrogen (which really goes nowhere until 2015, when the first hydrogen cars would presumably hit the market).
      Elmo Biggins
      • 6 Months Ago
      I doubt a level 3 charger will use more power than a typical business at any given hour.
      Joeviocoe
      • 6 Months Ago
      " In many ways, it's far more economic and feasible to install such infrastructure, than Public Charging points for EV's." No, since there is no NEED for public EV charging. That is only a convenience. Right now, people are buying EVs without a single nearby public charger. For those parking on the street, hybrids are a good solution. "Hydrogen can be installed using existing gas station outlets. It needs no commitment of public funds, and the difficulties of access etc, are already worked out.' No, hydrogen requires separate LARGE tanks, under lots of pressure.. compressors too. They COULD be placed with gasoline stations, but to serve an equivalent number of FCVs, it would take up twice as much room anyway. So it is like just building a new station. Sure, you can save space by keeping the convenience store. :) Public chargers won't become as dangerous as h2 stations. And can still be maintained by the the entity selling the power or facility renting the space. Yeah, I'm not happy about public money being used either.... unless it were only for NYC fleet use. In that case, it would be an internal expenditure and could at least guarantee proper utilization.
      mapoftazifosho
      • 3 Years Ago
      Could $4.4 million buy me 325 gas pumps with associated tanks etc?
        Dave
        • 6 Months Ago
        @mapoftazifosho
        A single gas pump could easily serve 325 cars. Each car only fuels up about once a week. So thats only 46 fills a day. Most probably, for $4.4 million dollars, you could build two gas stations and serve a fleet of 5000+ cars.
          Dave
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Dave
          "your assumptions don't help your case..." 12,000 miles / 52 weeks = 230 miles. So, the AVERAGE CAR fills up about once a week or less. Some more often, some less offten. So a gas station can support at least as many cars as I've stated. My assumption is very reasonable.
          Marcopolo
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Dave
          @ Dave Game,set and match to Dave ! Well, done !
          SNP
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Dave
          LoL, in response to my previous statement. I forgot that EVs need to be recharged almost everyday too. So you'd be charging the same couple of vehicles on the public charging unit every day. LoL, thousands of dollars in subsidized charging units, and it's only meant to benefit a few people every day and typically the same group of people. What a way to spend taxpayer money. Is this an example to redistribute everybody's money to the well off and/or stupid? I'd rather have my money go into R&D for the next wave of vehicle fuel source. BEVs are not the solution.
          Dave
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Dave
          Joe, you are wrong as always. Gas cars fill up about once a week. Assuming you are correct on the size of a tanker: 625 fillups per day x 7 days a week = 4375 cars supported by a gas station. And, in fact, there are about 150,000 gas stations in the USA, some tiny, some large. There are 250,000,000 vehicles operating in the country from Priuses to 18 wheelers. Thats an average of 1666 vehicles per station, not 625. So, obviously, you are wrong in practice as well as in theory. Stop your lies. And stop pretending that you know anything.
          mapoftazifosho
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Dave
          Dave, your assumption that every car fills up once a week is silly. And that all 250 million cars are regularly driven and fill up once a week. I own three cars and 2 of the 3 are not regularly driven, but are registered...With that said I fill up about once every 3 weeks. I'm def not the norm, but your assumptions don't help your case...
          Joeviocoe
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Dave
          In what world do BEVs need to be charged every day on a public charger? Narnia?
          SNP
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Dave
          But dave, all the greenies want charging stations. So lets do that math instead. If each car can get a full charge in 4hrs, and each gas station is open 24hrs a day, and electricity is charged at $2/hr of charging, that means each charging unit can charge about 6 cars a day. But if you have 12 charging units per station, by golly you can charge a whole 72 cars each day. That leaves a whopping $288/day of pure revenue coming in. I cant wait to blow an assload of money of retrofits for this booming business. But I'm not stupid, since i need workers there 24/7, I'll jack up the electricity rates to 6$/hr.
          Dave
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Dave
          In fact, if a gas station operates from 6am to 10pm, and a gas fillup takes 5 minutes, thats 192 fillups a day. If cars fill up once a week, thats a fleet of up to 1,344 cars supported by each gas pump.
          Joeviocoe
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Dave
          Dave, the pump could support it... but the tank could not. The logistics to get fueling trucks would prohibit such volume. The big fuel trucks can carry 10,000 gallons each. And usually visit the large gas stations once a day. That is 10,000/ 16 gallons (the average fill-up) = 625 cars supported by an entire gas station. No matter how many pumps.
          Joeviocoe
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Dave
          Yeah Dave, I thought you were talking about cars supported by day. Not, cars supported overall.. as in a car is 'supported' by a station even on days it doesn't refuel. In that case, my number does not even apply.
      Nick
      • 3 Years Ago
      325 is good, but it needs 3000.
        Marcopolo
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Nick
        Nick I admire your enthusiasm, but New York doesn't have 3000 EV's in need of recharging !
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 6 Months Ago
      hm.. why downrate Anne for stating the truth? we didn't have a gasoline infrastructure in the early 1900's either. As with all things, it got built in response to demand. Those level 3 chargers will come down in price.
      Elmo Biggins
      • 6 Months Ago
      "As will the hydrogen infrastructure. Where there is a demand and a profit motive - there is a way." There is a demand for clean, limitless energy, so maybe you should build an elevator to the moon to mine helium 3. Imagine all the profits. If only it was cost feasible to build. Same with hydrogen infrastructure, hence why it does not exist..
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