Back in the late 1970s, several Formula One teams were experimenting with six-wheeled F1 cars. The idea was to reduce drag and increase downforce while improving traction – they did, after all, manage to increase the contact surface of rubber to road while decreasing the height of the individual wheels. They showed considerable promise, but as with many developments in F1, they were quickly banned.

Tyrrell, March and Williams all toyed with the formula, and the results varied. But not since they raced have they all been in one place at the same time. And now they will as the organizers of the Goodwood Festival of Speed are bringing them together for this year's drive up the hill.

Spectators will be able to see the the Tyrrell P34 (pictured above), the Williams FW08B and the March 2-4-0. While the former two have been at Goodwood in previous years, this will mark the first time that the March will be there for the event – fitting since Goodwood is the seat of the Earl of March, patron of the event. Check out the official announcement below.
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THE WORLD'S FIRST EVER GATHERING OF ALL THREE SIX-WHEELER FORMULA 1 CARS TO TAKE PLACE AT THE GOODWOOD FESTIVAL OF SPEED

Next week's Festival of Speed (28 June -1 July) will see a unique gathering of unusual British Formula 1 machines, as for the first time ever, anywhere in the world, three infamous cars with 18 wheels between them come together at Goodwood.

The six-wheeled Tyrrell P34, March 2-4-0 and Williams FW08B have never been gathered together before, so the chance to see all three six-wheelers line-up in the paddocks at the Festival of Speed will be an exceptional one, not to be missed by any motor racing enthusiast.

Tyrrell raced the celebrated P34 six-wheeler in 1976 and 1977, with four wheels at the front. Fellow British Formula 1 teams March and Williams also built experimental six-wheeled cars, but with four wheels at the rear for increased traction. The March 2-4-0 - of similar vintage to the Tyrrell - will be making its Goodwood debut.

Like the March 2-4-0, the 1982 Williams FW08B had four rear wheels. It was designed for reduced drag, increased grip and improved ground effects, and was based on the conventional four-wheeled FW08. It was tested once and set lap records, with its unusual set-up providing huge grip and acceleration. In 1983 new F1 regulations banned six-wheeled cars, as well as four-wheel-drive, putting an end to the development of the six-wheeled experiments such as the Williams and March.

The six-wheeled F1 cars will be joined by more than 300 other vehicles at Goodwood.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 19 Comments
      Myself
      • 2 Years Ago
      There was also a six-wheeled Ferrari, only it had 4 big rear wheels - on a single axle. Go figure... http://www.auto123.com/en/racing-news/the-curious-6-wheel-ferrari-formula-1-car?artid=113405 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qy8gcTNP8Q0 (skip first few seconds to watch track photos)
      gtv4rudy
      • 2 Years Ago
      Is that 'Too Tall' Jones driving the this car?
      zizixx89
      • 2 Years Ago
      sooo all the power goes to the those front 4 wheels? or all six wheels lol if thats the case it would be F-AWD
      Boris Goltsman
      • 2 Years Ago
      Awesome !!!!
      dtrump_21
      • 2 Years Ago
      F**k me that looks soooooo awesome!!
      JR
      • 2 Years Ago
      This was F1 at it's best as far as innovation goes. Six wheels, fan cars, ground effects, 1.4k hp turbo 4's. Cut the engineers loose again.
      john m
      • 2 Years Ago
      LOL... Look at how high that drivers head sticks up. That driver looks like he's 8 feet tall:)
        Drakkon
        • 2 Years Ago
        @john m
        They were just in the dawn of driver safety.
        gtv4rudy
        • 2 Years Ago
        @john m
        No, it's just that the driver of this old F1 Tyrrell is way too tall. In it's original days of competition a driver was always properly seated lower in the cockpit.
      Fixitfixitstop
      • 2 Years Ago
      I read that the small tire radius caused faster tire wear and more frequent pit stops, negating a lot of the aerodynamic advantage.
      Brex
      • 2 Years Ago
      That thing looks like a rolling guillotine.
      ranks88
      • 2 Years Ago
      I think there was a Williams with six wheels, for in the back, I dont think it got to the track, was used for testing only.
      racingmaniac
      • 2 Years Ago
      I am pretty sure the notion of them increasing the contact patch is wrong. They were able to let the 6 wheel design race due to the fact that the car maintained the size of the contact patch, but with smaller tires. Their goal was to gain cleaner aero.
      DrifterZ
      • 2 Years Ago
      Wish the Ferrari could have been a part of this as well. Think they destroyed it though.
        creamwobbly
        • 2 Years Ago
        @DrifterZ
        "During a test at Fiorano, Reutemann crashed the only T6, and suffered a rear upright failure on another occasion." From this two-page article: http://www.auto123.com/en/racing-news/the-curious-6-wheel-ferrari-formula-1-car?artid=113405&pg=2
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