Car and Driver Tested continues with an episode comparing the night vision systems from the Big Three German luxury makers. While the testing involves a remote-controlled turkey and a deer crossbred with a construction cone, the most interesting thing the guys from C/D do is to cover the windshields of the cars to try and drive through an autocross course relying on technology alone. Hence the conversation through the sunroofs you see pictured above.

And the results? While we wouldn't call it an epic fail, it is an entertaining one. Night vision is one of the bells and whistles that's probably not destined to trickle down from the Audi A8, BMW 7 Series and Mercedes-Benz CL-Class anytime soon, but like most luxury features it's an impressive display of engineering.

Scroll down to watch the full episode.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 16 Comments
      Randy
      • 2 Years Ago
      SAVE YOUR TIME Recap and Quotes from End of Video "None of them are accurate" and "We don't have a winner"
      turbomonkey2k
      • 2 Years Ago
      Cadillac gave up on night vision something like 10 years ago. They even had a heads up system. It was pointless then and it's pointless now. Seriously, no one wants to see the deer before they hit it. That will only give you the false impression that you could have missed it. Sorry, you will NEVER miss the deer. You will ALWAYS hit it- even if you have night vision and those stupid little whistles on your bumper.
      Hazdaz
      • 2 Years Ago
      All these systems are fail because ultimately you have to look down into the screen to see anything, then typically you'd look back up out your windshield to see if that blob on the LCD screen was visible in real life. Also consider that if you were trying to navigate with just the LCD screen, like they were doing in the video, you are trying to maneuver a car in 3 dimensional space while looking at a 2D image on screen. No depth means no way of really knowing how far something is from the car. These systems will remain useless until their nighttime image is projected directly onto the windscreen, and the image is adjusted for the driver's stereoscopic vision by taking into account for parallax. In other words, 2 images would have to be projected onto the screen - one for the driver's left eye, and one for his right so he sees a stereo image of the road ahead.
        RocketRed
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Hazdaz
        Or the driver could wear night-vision goggles. Same thing. Not sexy? Then BMW would commission some very stylish ones and make them part of a 6K, Commando-Line package. bundled with the bespoke BMW toe-nail clippers and decoder-ring. And if you don't get the package, no leather. You get specially-engineered paper bag material seats instead. And people would still be saying, "but you can get a BMW for 35K and it has night-vision!"
      zizixx89
      • 2 Years Ago
      ohhhh just like the movie daybreakers
      LoneWolf
      • 2 Years Ago
      Well, it was available since 2000 n a Caddy Deville...so you'd think that after 12yrs, it would be refined and more widespread.
      NamorF-Pro
      • 2 Years Ago
      Why are they all German? No LS? Really? It has some of the best tech and night vision is included.
      desinerd1
      • 2 Years Ago
      It's amazing how much these companies charge for such a simple technology. I had a rearview camera in my old SUV that had infrared LEDs and sensor and could see up to 5-10'. I paid ~$150 for the whole thing, including the wireless display. I've also seen a few camcorders that can "see" infrared and they too cost $200-400.
        icerabbit
        • 2 Years Ago
        @desinerd1
        So just put a QVGA webcam on your car and see how effective a system you can make? Maybe you'll see 15ft out ahead. As opposed to these professional systems designed by teams of engineers that are analyzing viewed data from 300-500 ft away, to better camera optics, lens, sensor, ... The hardware and software will get better and come down in price. First to market systems are always expensive.
      miketim1
      • 2 Years Ago
      The new Lexus GS with the worlds biggest Nav screen Also has this system. how could it be left out.
      Dan
      • 9 Months Ago
      My issue with my a8L system is that in fog or rain the system is not effective.
      Shahul X
      • 2 Years Ago
      Not true, most Audis with night vision also have heads up display and the HUD works with the night vision and gives you warnings you can see on the hud.. As well as nav and other data..
        Dennis Kfc
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Shahul X
        if only they will have the missile launcher option with the HUD, then i would buy it
      Mike Wilkerson
      • 2 Years Ago
      A great showcase, for systems that I have to admit - I'm completely unfamiliar with. What I did note is that you're all looking at this (with the exception of the fun, electronic, rear-end-gutted pseudo-Turkey) from an aspect of nothing moving except your vehicle at a very slow rate of speed. While I can understand that the manufacturer of the vehicle wants to have the car remain completely unscathed, the fact is that the systems need to be tested for moving objects, and preferably at a high rate of speed. Having some data that projects how these things are going to work in a real-world scenario, while not nearly as entertaining as your fun here, is vital not only to the want to purchase, but potential life-saving ability of the units. Will be sure to return for more! Thanks for your information!
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