Geneva 2012: Renault Zoe
  • Geneva 2012: Renault Zoe
  • Geneva 2012: Renault Zoe

  • Geneva 2012: Renault Zoe

  • Geneva 2012: Renault Zoe
  • Geneva 2012: Renault Zoe

  • Geneva 2012: Renault Zoe
  • Geneva 2012: Renault Zoe

  • Geneva 2012: Renault Zoe
  • Geneva 2012: Renault Zoe

  • Geneva 2012: Renault Zoe
  • Geneva 2012: Renault Zoe

The 24 Hours of...Le Zoe?

Renault has put a new spin on the classic car race by seeing how far its Zoe electric vehicle could go in 24 hours. With a little bit of effort, the company managed to get oh-so-close to the 1,000-mile threshold, according to the French publication France Mobilite Electrique (kudos to TreeHugger for the translation).

The Zoe, which goes on sale this fall and has an estimated single-charge range of about 130 miles, went 994 miles during the cycle. The car, which TreeHugger says achieved a new 24-hour, electric vehicle distance record (Elon Musk, take note) sucked down nine fast charges during the effort.

Renault, which along with sister company Nissan has invested more than $5 billion in battery-electric vehicle technology, is trying to generate advance buzz for the Zoe. The French automaker debuted a production version of the Zoe at this March's Geneva Auto Show. Renault said the car would sell for the equivalent of just over $20,000 U.S. (after government incentives kick in) in both the UK and France. If that sounds low, keep the battery lease program of around $110 a month in mind.

Renault started taking pre-orders for the Zoe in Europe in March. Last month, Renault executives said the Zoe would likely outsell the Nissan Leaf in Europe because of the lower price.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 17 Comments
      Spec
      • 3 Years Ago
      I assume it was charged at the start so that is close to 100 miles per charge. Pretty good. If we assume they used about 4 hours for recharging that is 994/5 = ~50mph . . . a decent speed too. Is this car basically a rebadged Nissan Leaf or is it much different?
        Anne
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        Exact calculation: 4.5 hours charging, average speed = 1600 / 19.5 = 82 km/h = 51 mph. However they also lost some time decelerating and accelerating, so cruising speed might have been around the 85 km/h mark. I can add my calculation in response to Dave Mart on another thread: If they did 9 fast charges to 80% and started with a full battery, that works out to a range of 195 km for a full battery. (195 + 195 * .8 * 9) = 1599).
          DaveMart
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Anne
          Anne: That's cool. The stuff I had seen was a bit vague on the percentage charge in 30 minutes. BTW Yanks: 195km = 120 miles! ;-)
        Spec
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        994 miles / 20 hours = ~50mph.
        throwback
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        It's smaller than the Leaf. The Zoe is a B segment car. My question is what happens if you default on your battery lease payment? Do they take the whole car, take out the battery and return the battery free car to you?
          Spec
          • 3 Years Ago
          @throwback
          Maybe they have a remote kill switch that just makes the battery not function? I'm still unclear on how these leases work as well. And reading DaveMart and marco polo have made things even less clear. ;-)
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @throwback
          @Spec, MP, nods at Dave smugly, and comments, " our work here is done......!" :)
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @throwback
          The Zoe is conformant with Better Place specifications. That means the battery can be easily removed, and so in the event of default that is what they would have claim to, although they could charge you a fee for the two minute job of removal. What I took the trouble to establish about their battery lease terms is that, contrary to the unfounded assumptions being peddled here, the battery is indeed easily removable, and that although they very much want you to continue on a perpetual lease, they have no way of enforcing that, and when the lease expires you can have the battery removed and return it. The BMS etc will deal with any conformant battery. I have never at any stage, contrary to the ludicrous assertions made, said that leasing is in some way a free ride, simply that it was good to see an EV which could be got for the same initial purchase price as a diesel, and where the monthly battery lease could largely be offset against fuel savings. Whether is is better to lease or buy depends on the exact circumstances. Some seem to think that leasing, and only leasing, is a peculiarly nasty capitalist trick If you want further information on the exact terms of the battery lease, Renault have a service line which deals with enquiries as you type them in on the web.
      Marco Polo
      • 2 Years Ago
      Renault have built an excellent little EV, and should do well in the urban commuter market sector. If the ZOE fails to ignite sales, (forgetting the battery lease confusion) then low range commuter EV's are in real trouble ! The ZOE needs to sell in volume to recover it's considerable development cost. Even amortised across an extensive range of Renault product's including the brilliant Kangoo EV, the ZOE must sell at least 5-10,000 per month . Every auto-maker is watching the success or failure of Carlos Ghosn's ZOE. Should the ZOE succeed, Toyota GM, VW etc will rush competitors into the market. If Zoe fails, the Auto-maker will concentrate on more upmarket EREV's and Tesla rivals. The sales results for Mitsubishi iMev have been disappointing despite the economy of sharing an existing platform. A lot rides on the little ZOE. I wish the Zoe the very best of luck and success.
        Spec
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Marco Polo
        Well . .. they are going to need to be patient. With the current economic chaos in Europe and the recent drop in oil prices, the ability to sell EVs has gone down. Without higher oil prices & people being gainfully employed, such EVs are a very tough sell. :-/
      Ugo Sugo
      • 2 Years Ago
      Dividing 994 miles by 9 you get a bit more than 110 miles per charge at a respectable almost-highway average speed of 52 mph (considering half an hour stop per charge) . Now, assuming the zoe has the same powertrain as the leaf, it should have achieved about 73 miles per charge according to EPA. Either the numbers do not add up or the EPA is playing oil companies' game.
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ugo Sugo
        The EPA range of 73 miles for the Leaf is not based on running in reasonable temperatures at a constant speed, but a much more demanding mix. The Zoe is lighter and has been further optimised since the Leaf, and so it's 22kwh battery gets a bit longer range. The Leaf is rated at 109 miles on the NEDC cycle, as against the 125 miles of the Zoe on the only cycle it has been tested on, which would put the likely EPA figure for the Zoe at perhaps 83 miles, as against 73 miles for the Leaf. BTW, the NEDC cycle sounds very optimistic, as I can't see much more favourable conditions than running around an oval track at a constant speed of around 50 mph, and it actually got about 120 miles of range, as against the 125 figure the NEDC says. Not too bad though.
          Anne
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          The NEDC cycle contains city driving at even lower speeds than 80 km/h. That's where EV's shine, and supposedly the ZOE even more (due to better regenerative braking according to Renault). My guess is that the ZOE derives its good NEDC rating mostly from city driving. It is lighter too than the LEAF.
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ugo Sugo
        That is not the way it works as the Zoe would have started with a full charge. However, Anne correctly pointed out that the recharges would have been to 80% instead of messing around waiting tor the last bit of charge, and would take 30 minutes. That works out to around 120 miles per full charge. (100%, plus 9 charges at 80%, total 8.2 full charges, 994/8.2 = 121 miles/charge)
      Kei Jidosha
      • 2 Years Ago
      Renault has touted ZOE’s on-board 43kW Chameleon charger. Twice as fast as Tesla’s optional, extra cost 20kW on board unit. Notable if Renault confirms Chameleon’s use for this distance record, no external QC (supercharger network) needed. The benefit in utility, cost, and flexibility is clearly demonstrated.
      • 3 Years Ago
      It's nice looking than the Leaf.
    • Load More Comments